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  1. Raimond Gaita (2013). Professor R. F. Holland, 1923–2013. Philosophical Investigations 36 (3):195-200.
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  2. Raimond Gaita (2012). R. F. Holland. Philosophical Investigations 35 (3-4):260-276.
    My tribute to R. F. Holland focuses on what he calls “absolute goodness.” I try to explain what he means by it and how it connects with the common belief that moral absolutism entails that some acts must not be done “whatever the consequences.” I argue that Holland believes that this sense of absolute value should be understood in the light of a conception of the kind he develops of absolute goodness; that he is right to believe that “absolute ethics” (...)
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  3. Christopher Cordner & Raimond Gaita (eds.) (2011). Philosophy, Ethics, and a Common Humanity: Essays in Honour of Raimond Gaita. Routledge.
    The work of Raimond Gaita, in books such as Good and Evil: An Absolute Conception, A Common Humanity and The Philosopher's Dog, has made an outstanding and controversial contribution to philosophy and to the wider culture.
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  4. Raimond Gaita (2011). Literature, Genocide, and the Philosophy of International Law. In Rowan Cruft, Matthew H. Kramer & Mark R. Reiff (eds.), Crime, Punishment, and Responsibility: The Jurisprudence of Antony Duff. Oup Oxford.
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  5. Raimond Gaita (2011). Morality, Metaphysics and Religion. In Joseph Carlisle, James Carter & Daniel Whistler (eds.), Moral Powers, Fragile Beliefs: Essays in Moral and Religious Philosophy. Continuum International Publishing Group. 1.
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  6. Raimond Gaita (2007). Friendship and My Father. The Philosophers' Magazine 38 (38):46-48.
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  7. Raimond Gaita (2006). Torture: The Lesser Evil? Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 68 (2):251 - 278.
    Although torture is prohibited in international law, a consequentialist justification of it has occasionally been professed on the belief that torture is indispensable andeven morally obligatory as an information-gathering device in so-called 'ticking bomb' situations. The author adheres to the conviction that torture is an evil that could never justifiably be done. Objecting to the moral stand of consequentialism, he emphasizesthe distinctive terribleness of torture, drawing attention to the victim's infinite preciousness or 'sacredness', which even the concept of autonomy, or (...)
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  8. Raimond Gaita (2003). Novel Thinking. The Philosophers' Magazine 23:32-34.
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  9. Raimond Gaita (2003). The Philosopher's Dog. Routledge.
    In this lyrical and beautifully written book, Raimond Gaita tells inspirational, poignant, sometimes funny but never sentimental stories of the dogs, cats and cockatoos that lived and died within his own family. The Philosopher's Dog is above all a book about our creatureliness and its place in the understanding of our humanity.
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  10. Raimond Gaita (2003). Narrative, Identity and Moral Philosophy. Philosophical Papers 32 (3):261-277.
    I distinguish what I call ?minimal narrative? from narrative of the kind that might disclose a person's identity in biography or autobiography. The latter exists in what I call ?the realm of meaning?; a realm in which, in ways I try to make clear, form and content cannot be separated. The realm of meaning is also the realm in which we develop an understanding of what it means to lead a human life lucidly responsive to the defining facts of the (...)
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  11. David Parker & Raimond Gaita (2001). Multiculturalism and Universalism in Romulus, My Father [Review Article Plus Reply by Raimond Gaita.]. Critical Review 41:44.
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  12. Raimond Gaita (2000). A Common Humanity: Thinking About Love & Truth & Justice. Text Pub..
     
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  13. Raimond Gaita (1999/2000). A Common Humanity: Thinking About Love and Truth and Justice. Routledge.
    Powerful and timely, A Common Humanity asks why the language of morality has failed us. Drawing on examples of the Holocaust, the David Irving affair, the case of Mary Bell and the treatment of the Aborigines in Australia, Raimond Gaita challenges our received thinking about evil in this provocative exploration of what makes an ethical society.
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  14. Raimond Gaita (1992). Animal Thoughts. Philosophical Investigations 15 (3):227-44.
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  15. Raimond Gaita (1992). Goodness and Truth. Philosophy 67 (262):507 - 521.
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  16. Raimond Gaita (1991). Good and Evil: An Absolute Conception. St. Martin's Press.
    Raimond Gaita's Good and Evil is one of the most important, original and provocative books on the nature of morality to have been published in recent years. It is essential reading for anyone interested in what it means to talk about good and evil. Gaita argues that questions about morality are inseparable from the preciousness of each human being, an issue we can only address if we place the idea of remorse at the centre of moral life. Drawing on an (...)
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  17. Raimond Gaita (1991). Radical Critique, Scepticism and Commonsense. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 29:157-171.
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  18. Raimond Gaita (1990). Language and Conversation: Wittgenstein's Builders. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 28:101-115.
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  19. Peter Winch & Raimond Gaita (eds.) (1990). Value and Understanding: Essays for Peter Winch. Routledge.
    Written by eminent philosophers from Britain, Europe, America, and Australia, the essays of this collection are a tribute to Peter Winch, whose work is marked by his deep appreciation of the most fundamental aspect of Wittgenstein's legacy: that we cannot detach our concepts from their roots in human life. The voices in this volume unite in different tones of sympathy and criticism by discussing the theme of human conditioning: the human conditioning of what we can find intelligible, possible and impossible, (...)
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  20. Raimond Gaita (1989). The Personal in Ethics. In Dayton Z. Phillips & Peter G. Winch (eds.), Wittgenstein. 124--150.
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  21. Raimond Gaita (1983). Ii. Virtues, Human Good, and the Unity of a Life. Inquiry 26 (4):407 – 424.
    Maclntyre's ?disquieting suggestion? concerning the apparently irretrievably anarchic state of contemporary moral discourse begs the crucial questions in any argument over the notion of ?incoherence? in moral thought and practice. Thus his attempt to establish the canonical authority of Aristotelianism fails. Nonetheless, the attempt to reconstruct a plausible Aristotelianism is of independent interest. Maclntyre introduces the quasi?technical notion of a ?practice? to locate a non?reductive teleology of the virtues. Though certain teleological expressions come naturally in a deepened understanding of the (...)
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  22. Raimond Gaita (1983). Review: Moral Luck. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 33 (132):288 - 296.
    This work contains essays about moral philosophy and the theory of rational choice. themes include moral and philosophical limitations of utilitarianism, notions of integrity, relativism, and problems of moral conflict and rational choice. other concepts discussed are idealism, ought, moral obligation, internal and external reasons, justice, character, self-indulgence, practical necessity and pascal's wager.
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  23. Raimond Gaita (1983). Critical Notice. Philosophical Investigations 6 (3):214-228.
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  24. Raimond Gaita (1982). Better One Than Ten. Philosophical Investigations 5 (2):87-105.
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  25. Raimond Gaita (1981). Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature By Richard Rorty Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1980, 401 Pp., £12.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 56 (217):427-.
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  26. Gabriele Taylor & Raimond Gaita (1981). Integrity. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 55:143 - 176.
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