Search results for 'Rainer P. Born' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rainer P. Born (ed.) (1987). Artificial Intelligence: The Case Against. St Martin's Press.score: 870.0
  2. Rainer P. Born (1987). 8split Semantics: Provocations Concerning Theories of Meaning and Philosophy in General. In , Artificial Intelligence: The Case Against. St Martin's Press. 190.score: 870.0
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  3. E. W. Born, R. Dietz, M. P. Heide-Jørgensen & LØ Knutsen (1997). Historical and Present Status of the Atlantic Walrus (Odobenus Rosmarus Rosmarus) in Eastern Greenland. Meddelelser Om Grønland. BioScience 46:1-73.score: 240.0
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  4. Rainer Born (1977). Ludwig Boltzmann. Ort in einer Philosophie der Zeit in Osterreichische Philosophen und Ihr Einfluss auf die analytische Philosophie der Gegenwart. Band 1. [REVIEW] Conceptus. Zeitschrift Fur Philosophie Salzburg 11 (28-30):129-150.score: 240.0
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  5. Carlos Castro (2012). Born's Reciprocal Gravity in Curved Phase-Spaces and the Cosmological Constant. Foundations of Physics 42 (8):1031-1055.score: 66.0
    The main features of how to build a Born’s Reciprocal Gravitational theory in curved phase-spaces are developed. By recurring to the nonlinear connection formalism of Finsler geometry a generalized gravitational action in the 8D cotangent space (curved phase space) can be constructed involving sums of 5 distinct types of torsion squared terms and 2 distinct curvature scalars ${\mathcal{R}}, {\mathcal{S}}$ which are associated with the curvature in the horizontal and vertical spaces, respectively. A Kaluza-Klein-like approach to the construction of the (...)
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  6. R. Delbourgo & D. Lashmar (2008). Born Reciprocity and the 1/R Potential. Foundations of Physics 38 (11):995-1010.score: 66.0
    Many structures in nature are invariant under the transformation pair, (p,r)→(b r,−p/b), where b is some scale factor. Born’s reciprocity hypothesis affirms that this invariance extends to the entire Hamiltonian and equations of motion. We investigate this idea for atomic physics and galactic motion, where one is basically dealing with a 1/r potential and the observations are very accurate, so as to determine the scale b≡mΩ. We find that an Ω∼1.5×10−15 s−1 has essentially no effect on atomic physics but (...)
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  7. Františka + Tim Gilman (2011). Rainer Ganahl's S/L. Continent 1 (1):15-20.score: 54.0
    The greatest intensity of “live” life is captured from as close as possible in order to be borne as far as possible away. Jacques Derrida. Echographies of Television . Rainer Ganahl has made a study of studying. As part of his extensive autobiographical art practice, he documents and presents many of the ambitious educational activities he undertakes. For example, he has been videotaping hundreds of hours of solitary study that show him struggling to learn Chinese, Arabic and a host (...)
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  8. Nicolaas P. Landsman, Macroscopic Observables and the Born Rule. I. Long Run Frequencies.score: 42.0
    We clarify the role of the Born rule in the Copenhagen Interpretation of quantum mechanics by deriving it from Bohr's doctrine of classical concepts, translated into the following mathematical statement: a quantum system described by a noncommutative C*-algebra of observables is empirically accessible only through associated commutative C*-algebras. The Born probabilities emerge as the relative frequencies of outcomes in long runs of measurements on a quantum system; it is not necessary to adopt the frequency interpretation of single-case probabilities (...)
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  9. Martin D. Young (1970). Diseases The Biology of Mosquito-Borne Diseases P. F. Mattingly. BioScience 20 (21):1179-1179.score: 40.0
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  10. Stephen G. Low (2006). Reciprocal Relativity of Noninertial Frames and the Quaplectic Group. Foundations of Physics 36 (7):1036-1069.score: 36.0
    The frame associated with a classical point particle is generally noninertial. The point particle may have a nonzero velocity and force with respect to an absolute inertial rest frame. In time–position–energy–momentum-space {t, q, p, e}, the group of transformations between these frames leaves invariant the symplectic metric and the classical line element ds2 = d t2. Special relativity transforms between inertial frames for which the rate of change of momentum is negligible and eliminates the absolute rest frame by making velocities (...)
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  11. Augusto César Dias de Araujo (2010). Identidade e Fronteiras do espiritismo na obra de Allan Kardec (Identity and Boundaries of Spiritism in the Allan Kardec's works) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2010v8n16p117. [REVIEW] Horizonte 8 (16):117-135.score: 36.0
    Este artigo é uma reflexão sobre o processo de formação identitária do espiritismo a partir da análise de seu discurso fundador presente na obra de Allan Kardec (1804-1869). Para cumprir este objetivo, trabalhar-se-á com a hipótese de que tal processo acontece a partir de uma peculiar interação do espiritismo com três instâncias de conhecimento: a ciência, a filosofia e a religião. Através da análise do exemplo específico de como o espiritismo interpreta elementos da tradição cristã-católica, dando-lhes um significado renovado, pretende-se (...)
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  12. Joseph P. De Marco (1985). Philosophy Born of Struggle. Teaching Philosophy 8 (4):361-362.score: 36.0
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  13. Ildo Perondi, Fabrizio Zandonadi Catenassi & Gisele Soares Silva (2013). A centralidade da Palavra de Deus em Lucas 5,1-11 (The centrality of the Word od God in Luke 5,1-11) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2013v11n30p682. [REVIEW] Horizonte 11 (30):682-708.score: 36.0
    Pouca atenção foi dada pelos estudiosos para a função da Palavra de Deus no relato da pesca milagrosa em Lucas, tanto em nível literário, quanto teológico. Diante disso, o objetivo deste trabalho foi analisar a perícope de Lc 5,1-11, com enfoque na Palavra de Deus, proclamada em Jesus e por ele. A metodologia utilizada foi a análise e interpretação de textos, privilegiando o método histórico-crítico e os seus elementos essenciais, além do uso de outros métodos, baseados na ciência da linguagem. (...)
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  14. T. Mulder, J. Hochstenbach, P. Dijkstra & J. Geertzen (2008). Born to Adapt, but Not in Your Dreams. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1266-1271.score: 36.0
  15. J. G. Berry, P. Ryan, M. S. Gold, A. J. Braunack-Mayer & K. M. Duszynski (2012). A Randomised Controlled Trial to Compare Opt-in and Opt-Out Parental Consent for Childhood Vaccine Safety Surveillance Using Data Linkage. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (10):619-625.score: 30.0
    Introduction No consent for health and medical research is appropriate when the criteria for a waiver of consent are met, yet some ethics committees and data custodians still require informed consent. Methods A single-blind parallel-group randomised controlled trial: 1129 families of children born at a South Australian hospital were sent information explaining data linkage of childhood immunisation and hospital records for vaccine safety surveillance with 4 weeks to opt in or opt out by reply form, telephone or email. A (...)
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  16. Richard Arneson, Introduction to Rawls on Justice and Rawls on Utilitarianism.score: 24.0
    According to Rawls, the principles of justice are principles that determine a fair resolution of conflicts of interest among persons in a society. “A set of principles is required for choosing among the various social arrangements which determine this division of advantages and for underwriting an agreement on the proper distributive shares” (p. 4). Different interpretations or conceptions of justice fill out this core concept; a theory of justice seeks a best conception. Justice takes priority over other normative claims—as Rawls (...)
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  17. Paul Tappenden (2011). Evidence and Uncertainty in Everett's Multiverse. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 62 (1):99-123.score: 24.0
    How does it come about then, that great scientists such as Einstein, Schrödinger and De Broglie are nevertheless dissatisfied with the situation? Of course, all these objections are levelled not against the correctness of the formulae, but against their interpretation. [...] The lesson to be learned from what I have told of the origin of quantum mechanics is that probable refinements of mathematical methods will not suffice to produce a satisfactory theory, but that somewhere in our doctrine is hidden a (...)
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  18. John G. Cramer (1986). The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Reviews of Modern Physics 58 (3):647-687.score: 24.0
    Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics deals with these problems is reviewed. A new interpretation of the formalism of quantum mechanics, the transactional interpretation, is presented. The basic element of this interpretation is the transaction describing a quantum event as an exchange of advanced and retarded waves, as implied by the work of Wheeler and Feynman, Dirac, and others. The transactional interpretation is explicitly nonlocal and thereby consistent with recent tests of the Bell inequality, yet is relativistically invariant and fully causal. (...)
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  19. Ryan Wasserman (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Problem of Change. Philosophy Compass 5 (3):283-286.score: 24.0
    Our world is a world of change. Children are born and grow into adults. Material possessions rust and decay with age and ultimately perish. Yet scepticism about change is as old as philosophy itself. Heraclitus, for example, argued that nothing could survive the replacement of parts, so that it is impossible to step into the same river twice. Zeno argued that motion is paradoxical, so that nothing can alter its location. Parmenides and his followers went even further, arguing that (...)
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  20. Steven M. Rosen (2013). Bridging the “Two Cultures”: Merleau-Ponty and the Crisis in Modern Physics. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (2):1-12.score: 24.0
    This paper brings to light the significance of Merleau-Ponty’s thinking for contemporary physics. The point of departure is his 1956–57 Collège de France lectures on Nature, coupled with his reflections on the crisis in modern physics appearing in THE VISIBLE AND THE INVISIBLE. Developments in theoretical physics after his death are then explored and a deepening of the crisis is disclosed. The upshot is that physics’ intractable problems of uncertainty and subject-object interaction can only be addressed by shifting its philosophical (...)
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  21. Ernest Lepore, The Reality of Language.score: 24.0
    I conclude that there is no such thing as a language, not if a language is anything like what many philosophers and linguists have supposed. There is therefore no such thing to be learned, mastered or born with. (Davidson, 1986, p. 446).
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  22. Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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  23. Scott Soames (2011). What Vagueness and Inconsistency Tell Us About Interpretation. In Andrei Marmor & Scott Soames (eds.), Philosophical Foundations of Language in the Law. Oxford University Press, Usa. 31--57.score: 24.0
    Two Kinds of Vagueness When signing up for insurance benefits at my job, I was asked, “Do you have children, and if so are they young enough to be included on your policy?” I replied that I had two children, both of whom were over 21. The benefits officer responded, “That’s too vague. In some circumstances children of covered employees are eligible for benefits up to their 26th birthday. I need their ages to determine whether they can be included on (...)
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  24. Andre Ariew (2007). Under the Influence of Malthus's Law of Population Growth: Darwin Eschews the Statistical Techniques of Aldolphe Quetelet. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 38 (1):1-19.score: 24.0
    In the epigraph, Fisher is blaming two generations of theoretical biologists, from Darwin on, for ignoring Quetelet's statistical techniques and hence harboring confusions about evolution and natural selection. He is right to imply that Darwin and his contemporaries were aware of the core of Quetelet's work. Quetelet's seminal monograph, Sur L'homme, was widely discussed in Darwin's academic circles. We know that Darwin owned a copy (Schweber 1977). More importantly, we have in Darwin's notebooks two entries referring to Quetelet's work on (...)
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  25. Francis Hutcheson (1755/1968). A System of Moral Philosophy. New York, A.M. Kelley.score: 24.0
    THE P R E F A C E, Giving fome ACCOUNT of the LIFE, WRITINGS, and CHARACTER of the AUTHOR. T"\R. FRANCIS HUTCHESON was born on the 8th of ...
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  26. James Wilson, Health Inequities.score: 24.0
    The infant mortality rate in Liberia is 50 times higher than it is in Sweden, whilst a child born in Japan has a life expectancy at birth of more than double that of one born in Zambia. 1 And within countries, we see differences which are nearly as great. For example, if you were in the USA and travelled the short journey from the poorer parts of Washington to Montgomery County Maryland, you would find that ‘for each mile (...)
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  27. John Kilcullen, Adam Smith: The Moral Sentiments.score: 24.0
    Adam Smith was born in Kirkcaldy, Scotland, in 1723 (Source on Smith's life: E G West, Adam Smith ). He entered Glasgow University in 1737, aged 14. This university still followed some practices of the medieval universities, for example in admitting students at age 14. Its professors still took fees directly from students: that had been the original practice in medieval universities, but in more famous universities rich people had endowed colleges within the university, which paid lecturers' salaries. The (...)
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  28. Timothy Morton (2011). Objects as Temporary Autonomous Zones. Continent 1 (3):149-155.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 149-155. The world is teeming. Anything can happen. John Cage, “Silence” 1 Autonomy means that although something is part of something else, or related to it in some way, it has its own “law” or “tendency” (Greek, nomos ). In their book on life sciences, Medawar and Medawar state, “Organs and tissues…are composed of cells which…have a high measure of autonomy.”2 Autonomy also has ethical and political valences. De Grazia writes, “In Kant's enormously influential moral philosophy, autonomy (...)
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  29. Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). Cumposition: Theses on Philosophy's Etymology. Continent 2 (1).score: 24.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 44–55. Philosophers are sperm, poetry erupts sperm and dribbles, philosopher recodes term, to terminate, —A. Staley Groves 1 There is, in the relation of human languages to that of things, something that can be approximately described as “overnaming”—the deepest linguistic reason for all melancholy and (from the point of view of the thing) for all deliberate muteness. Overnaming as the linguistic being of melancholy points to another curious relation of language: the overprecision that obtains in the tragic (...)
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  30. Michael W. Small (1992). Attitudes Towards Business Ethics Held by Western Australian Students: A Comparative Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 11 (10):745 - 752.score: 24.0
    This paper is based on the findings of research into the attitudes towards business ethics of a group of business students in Western Australia. The questionnaire upon which the research was based was originally used by Preble and Reichel (1988) in an investigation they undertook into the attitudes towards business ethics held by two similar groups of United States and Israeli business students. The specific purpose of the current investigation was to administer the same questionnaire with one minor modification to: (...)
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  31. Eugene Thacker (2012). Cosmic Pessimism. Continent 2 (2):66-75.score: 24.0
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 66–75 ~*~ We’re Doomed. Pessimism is the night-side of thought, a melodrama of the futility of the brain, a poetry written in the graveyard of philosophy. Pessimism is a lyrical failure of philosophical thinking, each attempt at clear and coherent thought, sullen and submerged in the hidden joy of its own futility. The closest pessimism comes to philosophical argument is the droll and laconic “We’ll never make it,” or simply: “We’re doomed.” Every effort doomed to failure, every (...)
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  32. Manuel Bremer (2008). Kearns' Illocutionary Logic and the Liar. History and Philosophy of Logic 29 (3):223-225.score: 24.0
    In his recent paper in History and Philosophy of Logic, John Kearns argues for a solution of the Liar paradox using an illocutionary logic (Kearns 2007 ). Paraconsistent approaches, especially dialetheism, which accepts the Liar as being both true and false, are rejected by Kearns as making no ?clear sense? (p. 51). In this critical note, I want to highlight some shortcomings of Kearns' approach that concern a general difficulty for supposed solutions to (semantic) antinomies like the Liar. It is (...)
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  33. Christof Tannert (2010). The Autonomy Axiom and the Cloning of Humans. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 13 (1):4-7.score: 24.0
    Many people all over the world are convinced that cloning human beings is unethical and should be outlawed through prohibitions in criminal law. In spite of this, debate flares up repeatedly whenever experiments with human embryonic cells are carried out somewhere in the world. This will continue to happen as long as the conviction that cloning human beings is unethical lacks a logical philosophical-ethical foundation, which is still the case1,2. In addition, a foundation that could be more permanent against the (...)
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  34. Joseph Brent (1993). Charles Sanders Peirce: A Life. History and Philosophy of Logic 14 (2):531-538.score: 24.0
    Charles Sanders Peirce was born in September 1839 and died five months before the guns of August 1914. He is perhaps the most important mind the United States has ever produced. He made significant contributions throughout his life as a mathematician, astronomer, chemist, geodesist, surveyor, cartographer, metrologist, engineer, and inventor. He was a psychologist, a philologist, a lexicographer, a historian of science, a lifelong student of medicine, and, above all, a philosopher, whose special fields were logic and semiotics. He (...)
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  35. Nick Skiadopoulos & Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2011). Greek Returns: The Poetry of Nikos Karouzos. Continent 1 (3):201-207.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 201-207. “Poetry is experience, linked to a vital approach, to a movement which is accomplished in the serious, purposeful course of life. In order to write a single line, one must have exhausted life.” —Maurice Blanchot (1982, 89) Nikos Karouzos had a communist teacher for a father and an orthodox priest for a grandfather. From his four years up to his high school graduation he was incessantly educated, reading the entire private library of his granddad, comprising mainly (...)
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  36. B. Floyd (2005). Heights and Weights of da-an Boys: Did Sisters Really Make a Difference? Journal of Biosocial Science 37 (3):287-300.score: 24.0
    This study further examined the negative association between boys77, differences in height and log-transformed weight were judged using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with measurement age as a covariate, and parental education level (four levels), number of sisters (0, 1, 2 or 3+) and number of brothers (0, 1, 2+) as predictors. The relative importance of birth order and sibling sex was examined among the near majority of boys with one sibling (47%, 278/596). The sibling composition variable was defined using mutually (...)
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  37. Nick Skiadopoulos & Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2011). Greek Returns: The Poetry of Nikos Karouzos. Continent 1 (3):201-207.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 201-207. “Poetry is experience, linked to a vital approach, to a movement which is accomplished in the serious, purposeful course of life. In order to write a single line, one must have exhausted life.” —Maurice Blanchot (1982, 89) Nikos Karouzos had a communist teacher for a father and an orthodox priest for a grandfather. From his four years up to his high school graduation he was incessantly educated, reading the entire private library of his granddad, comprising mainly (...)
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  38. Stuart F. Spicker (1970). The Philosophy of the Body. Chicago,Quadrangle Books.score: 24.0
    Of the nature and origin of the mind, by B. de Spinoza.--Spinoza and the theory of organism, by H. Jonas.--Man a machine, and The natural history of the soul, by J. O. de la Mettrie.--On the first ground of the distinction of regions in space, and What is orientation in thinking? by I. Kant.--Soul and body, by J. Dewey.--The philosophical concept of a human body, by D. C. Long.--Are persons bodies? By B. A. O. Williams.--Lived body, environment, and ego, by (...)
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  39. Audrey A. Spindler & Janice D. Schultz (1996). Comparison of Dietary Variety and Ethnic Food Consumption Among Chinese, Chinese-American, and White American Women. Agriculture and Human Values 13 (3):64-73.score: 24.0
    The study's purpose was to estimate the variety of foods consumed within standard and ethnic food categories by three groups of women between 18 and 35 years of age. Foreign-born Chinese women [N = 21], Chinese-American women [N = 20] and white American women [N = 23] kept 4-day food records, after instruction. Analysis of variance showed that the mean number of different foods consumed by the foreign-born Chinese was significantly [p < 0.05] lower than those eaten by (...)
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  40. B. Floyd (2003). Patrilineal Family Values, Family Planning and Variation in Stature Among Taiwanese Six-Year-Olds. Journal of Biosocial Science 35 (3):369-384.score: 24.0
    It has been argued that patrilineal joint family systems tend to bias family planning decisions in favour of sons. A simple model suggests that in such societies, any given son will be more highly valued by his parents (1) the fewer his brothers and (2) the earlier his birth is in the brother series. A daughter's value will be greater (1) the fewer brothers she has and (2) the earlier her birth is relative to other sisters. This study first addresses (...)
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  41. J. Graaff (2001). South African Explanations of Political Violence 1980-1995. South African Journal of Philosophy 20 (2):102-123.score: 24.0
    During the 1980's and the early 1990's South Africa experienced disturbing political violence of an unprecedented scope, intensity and nature. It was disturbing because it entailed acts of horrifying brutality, notably the ‘necklace' and the massacre, all of this against the background of ‘civilized' and measured com promise and negotiation. It stubbornly continued despite the unbanning of the liberation political organisations, and the holding of ‘free and fair' elections in April 1994. And it was unprecedented in a whole range of (...)
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  42. Feliz Molina (2011). A Playful Reading of the Double Quotation in The Descent of Alette by Alice Notley. Continent 1 (4).score: 24.0
    continent. 1.4 (2011): 230—233. A word about the quotation marks. People ask about them, in the beginning; in the process of giving themselves up to reading the poem, they become comfortable with them, without necessarily thinking precisely about why they’re there. But they’re there, mostly to measure the poem. The phrases they enclose are poetic feet. If I had simply left white spaces between the phrases, the phrases would be read too fast for my musical intention. The quotation marks make (...)
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  43. Mikhail P. Moshkin, Eugene A. Novikov, Sergey E. Tkachev & Valentin V. Vlasov (2009). Epidemiology of a Tick‐Borne Viral Infection: Theoretical Insights and Practical Implications for Public Health. Bioessays 31 (6):620-628.score: 16.0
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  44. Thomas P. Flint (2001). The Possibilities of Incarnation: Some Radical Molinist Suggestions. Religious Studies 37 (3):307-320.score: 12.0
    The traditional doctrine of the Incarnation maintains that God became man. But was it necessary that God become the particular man He in fact became? Could some man or woman other than the man born in Bethlehem roughly two thousand years ago have been assumed by the Son to effect our salvation? This essay addresses such questions from the perspective of one embracing Molina's picture of divine providence. After showing how Molina thought his theory of middle knowledge helps alleviate (...)
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  45. P. Dimas (2003). Recollecting Forms in the "Phaedo". Phronesis 48 (3):175 - 214.score: 12.0
    According to an interpretation that has dominated the literature, the traditional interpretation as I call it, the recollection argument aims at establishing the thesis that our learning in this life consists in recollecting knowledge the soul acquired before being born into a body, or thesis R, by using the thesis that there exist forms, thesis F, as a premise. These entities, the forms, are incorporeal, immutable, and transcendent in the sense that they exist separately from material perceptibles, which in (...)
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  46. P. H. Brazier (2014). 'God … or a Bad, or Mad, Man': C.S. Lewis's Argument for Christ – A Systematic Theological, Historical and Philosophical Analysis of Aut Deus Aut Malus Homo. Heythrop Journal 55 (1):1-30.score: 12.0
    The proposition that Jesus was ‘Bad, Mad or God’ is central to C.S. Lewis's popular apologetics. It is fêted by American Evangelicals, cautiously endorsed by Roman Catholics and Protestants, but often scorned by philosophers of religion. Most, mistakenly, regard Lewis's trilemma as unique. This paper examines the roots of this proposition in a two thousand year old theological and philosophical tradition (that is, aut Deus aut malus homo), grounded in the Johannine trilemma (‘unbalanced liar’, or ‘demonically possessed’, or ‘the God (...)
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  47. Scott J. Reynolds, Bradley P. Owens & Alex L. Rubenstein (2012). Moral Stress: Considering the Nature and Effects of Managerial Moral Uncertainty. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):491-502.score: 12.0
    To better illuminate aspects of stress that are relevant to the moral domain, we present a definition and theoretical model of “moral stress.” Our definition posits that moral stress is a psychological state born of an individual’s uncertainty about his or her ability to fulfill relevant moral obligations. This definition assumes a self-and-others relational basis for moral stress. Accordingly, our model draws from a theory of the self (identity theory) and a theory of others (stakeholder theory) to suggest that (...)
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  48. Brian P. Bloomfield & Theo Vurdubakis (2003). Imitation Games: Turing, Menard, Van Meegeren. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 5 (1):27-38.score: 12.0
    For many, the very idea of an artificialintelligence has always been ethicallytroublesome. The putative ability of machinesto mimic human intelligence appears to callinto question the stability of taken forgranted boundaries between subject/object,identity/similarity, free will/determinism,reality/simulation, etc. The artificiallyintelligent object thus appears to threaten thehuman subject with displacement and redundancy.This article takes as its starting point AlanTuring''s famous ''imitation game,'' (the socalled ''Turing Test''), here treated as aparable of the encounter between human originaland machine copy – the born and the made. (...)
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  49. Frederick P. Van De Pitte (1985). Descartes' Innate Ideas. Kant-Studien 76 (1-4):363-384.score: 12.0
    A careful examination of descartes' works shows that innate ideas are not born with the mind, But are generated by (i.E., Born within) the mind. This is descartes' way of talking about empirical concept formation, As well as what the mind can infer from these concepts. Particular examples are examined to provide the material and formal conditions for identifying innate ideas. Descartes forces the transition from medieval to very modern epistemology.
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  50. P. Tappenden (2000). Identity and Probability in Everett's Multiverse. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (1):99-114.score: 12.0
    There are currently several versions of Everett's relative state interpretation of quantum mechanics, responding to a number of perceived problems for the original proposal. One of those problems is whether Everett's idea is in accord with the standard 'probabilistic' interpretation implicit in the Born rule. I argue in defence of what appears to be Everett's original view on this. The contribution I aim to make is a more complete discussion of the central issues of the identity of objects and (...)
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