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  1. Ralph H. Johnson (forthcoming). The Place of Argumentation in the Theory of Reasoning. Communication and Cognition.
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  2. Ralph H. Johnson & J. Anthony Blair (forthcoming). The Recent Development of Informal Logic. Informal Logic: The First International Symposium.
     
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  3. Ralph H. Johnson & Benjamin Hamby (forthcoming). A Meta-Level Approach to the Problem of Defining ‘Critical Thinking. Argumentation:1-14.
    The problem of defining ‘critical thinking’ needs a fresh approach. When one takes into consideration the sheer quantity of definitions and their obvious differences, an onlooker might be tempted to conclude that there is no inherent meaning to the term: that each author seems to consider that he or she is free to offer a definition that suits them. And, with a few exceptions, there has not been much discussion among proposers about the strength and weaknesses of the attempted definitions. (...)
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  4. Ralph H. Johnson, The Rise of Informal Logic: Essays on Argumentation, Critical Thinking, Reasoning and Politics.
    We are pleased to release this edition of Ralph Johnson’s The Rise of Informal Logic as Volume 2 in the series Windsor Studies in Argumentation. This edition is a reprint of the previous Vale Press edition with some typographical errors and other minor mistakes corrected. The prime motive for gathering Ralph H. Johnson’s essays under one cover is their clear articulation of the goals, concerns and problems of the discipline of informal logic. To my knowledge all of the published articles, (...)
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  5. J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson (2013). A List of Trudy Govier's Publications. Informal Logic 33 (2):332-341.
    The Editors thank Ken Peacock for his assistance.
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  6. J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson (2013). Preface. Informal Logic 33 (2):81-82.
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  7. Ralph H. Johnson, Commentary On: Adam Auch's "Virtuous Argumentation and the Challenges of Hype.
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  8. Ralph H. Johnson, Defeasibility From the Perspective of Informal Logic.
    The notions of defeasibility and defeasible reasoning have generated a great deal of interest in various research communities. Here I want to focus on their use in logic and argumentation studies. I will approach these topics from the perspective of an informal logician who finds himself struggling with some issues that surround the idea of and the deployment of the concept of defeasibility. My intention is to make those struggles as clear as I can.
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  9. Ralph H. Johnson (2013). Govier's "Invention" of the Theory of Argument. Informal Logic 33 (2):98-115.
    In this paper, I propose that the inquiry known as a/the theory of argument is the “invention” of Trudy Govier, using that term in its rhetorical sense, viz., the process of choosing ideas appropriate to the subject. In her paper, “Is a Theory of Argument Possible?” Govier used the idea of theory of argument to focus her discussion on problems in argument analysis and evaluation that came to light in the 1970s and 1980s. The idea of a theory of argument (...)
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  10. Ralph H. Johnson (2013). The Role of Audience in Argumentation From the Perspective of Informal Logic. Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (4):533-549.
    One of the distinctive features of rhetorical approaches to the study of argumentation is the emphasis placed on the role of the audience. Here one thinks immediately of the influence of Chaïm Perelman and of his and Lucie Olbrechts-Tyteca’s The New Rhetoric. There is something importantly right about an audience-centered approach to argumentation. Clearly if you wish to persuade an audience of your position (or gain the acceptance of your thesis), you must engage that audience and in some sense carry (...)
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  11. Ralph H. Johnson & Christopher W. Tindale (2013). Introduction. Philosophy and Rhetoric 46 (4):379-391.
    When considering the interactions between rhetoric and argumentation, readers of this journal will no doubt be reminded of the seminal work of Henry W. Johnstone Jr. (1959; 1978) who gathered both concerns together in ways that were designed to engage philosophers and persuade them of the intellectual seriousness of both enterprises. He was, of course, a principal force among those who brought Chaïm Perelman’s work to the attention of audiences in North America, and he himself entered into deep and fruitful (...)
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  12. J. Anthony Blair, Ralph H. Johnson, Hans V. Hansen & Christopher W. Tindale (2012). In Memoriam: Jonathan Adler 1949 – 2012. Informal Logic 32 (2):160.
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  13. Ralph H. Johnson (2012). When Informal Logic Met Critical Thinking. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 27 (3):5-14.
    In this reflection piece, Ralph Johnson provides an account of the development of informal logic and how it intersected with the Critical Thinking Movement. Section I is an account of the origins of what Johnson calls the “Informal Logic Initiative.” Section II discusses how the Informal Logic Initiative connected with the Critical Thinking Movement at the Sonoma State University Conferences starting in 1981. Section III discusses the relationship between logic and critical thinking. Section IV describes “The Network Problem,” which emerged (...)
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  14. Ralph H. Johnson, Revisiting the Logical/Dialectical/Rhetorical Triumvirate.
    Many argumentation theorists have adopted the view that argumentation may be approached from three different perspectives: the logical, the dialectical and the rhetorical—which I refer to as the Triumvirate.). According to Wenzel , the conceptual foundation for this Triumvirate is the distinction between argumentation as product, as process and as procedure . In this paper, I want to raise questions about the Triumvirate View and the Tripartite Distinction on which it is based.
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  15. Ralph H. Johnson (2007). Anticipating Objections as a Way of Coping with Dissensus. In Christopher W. Tindale Hans V. Hansen (ed.), Dissensus and the Search for Common Ground. Ossa.
    One of the traditional ways in which we manage dissensus is by argumentation, which may be construed as the attempt of the proponent to persuade rationally the other party of the truth of some thesis. To achieve this, the arguer will often anticipate a possible objection. In this paper, I attempt to shed light on the normative aspect of the task of anticipating objections. I deal with such questions as: How is the arguer to anticipate objections? Which of the anticipated (...)
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  16. Ralph H. Johnson, Commentary on Kvernbekk.
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  17. Ralph H. Johnson (2006). Making Sense of “Informal Logic”. Informal Logic 26 (3):231-258.
    This paper is an exercise in intellectual history, an attempt to understand how a specific term—”informal logic”— came to be interpreted in so many different ways. I trace the emergence and development of “informal logic” to help explain the many different meanings, how they emerged and how they are related. This paper is also, to some degree, an account of a movement that developed outside the mainstream of philosophy, whose origins lie in a desire to make logic useful (echoing Dewey).
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  18. Ralph H. Johnson (2006). The Ambiguous Relationship Between Pragma-Dialectics and Logic. In F. H. van Eemeren, Peter Houtlosser, Haft-van Rees & A. M. (eds.), Considering Pragma-Dialectics: A Festschrift for Frans H. L. Erlbaum Associates. 127.
     
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  19. Ralph H. Johnson, Theory and Practice Again: Challenges From Pinto and Toulmin.
    In Argument, Inference and Dialectic Pinto argues that critical practice can furnish us with the necessary guidance to answer our questions about argument and inference; we do not need to develop a theory of argument/inference. Pinto’s provocative remarks raise questions about the appeal to practice, and recall problems that Toulmin encounters in development of his innovative theory in The Uses of Argument . In this paper, I juxtapose and reflect on these developments.
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  20. Ralph H. Johnson, Commentary on Tindale.
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  21. Ralph H. Johnson, Why “Visual Arguments” Aren’T Arguments.
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  22. Hans V. Hansen, Christopher W. Tindale, J. Anthony Blair, Ralph H. Johnson & Robert C. Pinto (eds.) (2002). Argumentation and its Applications, CD-ROM. Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation.
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  23. Ralph H. Johnson (2002). Manifest Rationality Reconsidered: Reply to My Fellow Symposiasts. [REVIEW] Argumentation 16 (3):311-331.
    In this paper, I respond to papers on my Manifest Rationality (2000) by Leo Groarke, Hans Hansen, David Hitchcock, and Christopher Tindale presented at the meetings of the Ontario Philosophical Society, October 2000. From the many useful challenges they have directed at my position, I have chosen to focus on two. The dominant issue raised by their papers concerns my definition of argument, and particularly problems with the idea of a dialectical tier. I have selected that as the first strand. (...)
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  24. Ralph H. Johnson, Commentary on Kauffeld.
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  25. Ralph H. Johnson (2001). Interpreting Shell's 'Clear Thinking in Troubled Times'. Informal Logic 21 (3).
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  26. J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson (2000). Informal Logic: An Overview. Informal Logic 20 (2).
    In this overview article, we first explain what we take informal logic to be, discussing misconceptions and distinguishing our conception of it from competing ones; second, we briefly catalogue recent informal logic research, under 14 headings; third, we suggest four broad areas of problems and questions for future research; fourth, we describe current scholarly resources for informal logic; fifth, we discuss three implications of informal logic for philosophy in particular, and take note ofpractical consequences of a more general sort.
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  27. Ralph H. Johnson, More on Arguers and Their Dialectical Obligations.
    In her 1997 OSSA paper, Trudy Govier discusses in detail my thesis that arguers have dialectical obligations. In a 1998 paper she further examines this thesis to see whether it is viable and concludes that it faces serious problems. In this paper, I assess the state of the thesis in light of Govier's discussion of it. I urge that we have something to gain from the empirical turn--from investigating best practices. At the end, I take a step back to ask (...)
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  28. Ralph H. Johnson (1999). The Relation Between Formal and Informal Logic. Argumentation 13 (3):265-274.
    The issue of the relationship between formal and informal logic depends strongly on how one understands these two designations. While there is very little disagreement about the nature of formal logic, the same is not true regarding informal logic, which is understood in various (often incompatible) ways by various thinkers. After reviewing some of the more prominent conceptions of informal logic, I will present my own, defend it and then show how informal logic, so understood, is complementary to formal logic.
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  29. Ralph H. Johnson (1998). Argumentative Space: Logical and Rhetorical Approaches. In H. V. Hansen, C. W. Tindale & A. V. Colman (eds.), Argumentation and Rhetoric. Vale.
     
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  30. Ralph H. Johnson (1998). Douglas N. Walton, A Pragmatic Theory of Fallacy. Argumentation 12 (1):115-123.
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  31. Ralph H. Johnson & J. Anthony Blair (1998). New Essays in Informal Logic. Philosophy and Rhetoric 31 (2):164-167.
     
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  32. Ralph H. Johnson, Commentary on Allen.
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  33. Ralph H. Johnson (1996). CriticaI Thinking and Command of Language. Inquiry 16 (2):78-92.
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  34. Ralph H. Johnson (1995). The Principle of Vulnerability. Informal Logic 17 (2).
    This paper seeks to articulate and defend the principle that every argument is susceptible to criticism and hence the arguer must not seek to immunize the argument from criticism. Considerations both in support of, and opposed to, the principle are considered.
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  35. Ralph H. Johnson (1994). Argumentation: A Pragmatic Perspective. Inquiry 13 (3-4):3-8.
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  36. J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson (1992). Introduction. Informal Logic 14 (1).
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  37. Ralph H. Johnson (1991). In Response to Walton. Philosophy and Rhetoric 24 (4):362 - 366.
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  38. Ralph H. Johnson (1991). Misconceptions of Informal Logic. Teaching Philosophy 14 (1):35-52.
  39. Ralph H. Johnson (1990). Acceptance Is Not Enough: A Critique of Hamblin. Philosophy and Rhetoric 23 (4):271 - 287.
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  40. Ralph H. Johnson (1990). Hamblin on the Standard Treatment. Philosophy and Rhetoric 23 (3):153 - 167.
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  41. Ralph H. Johnson (1989). Massey on Fallacy and Informal Logic: A Reply. Synthese 80 (3):407 - 426.
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  42. Ralph H. Johnson (1988). Change in View. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 18 (1):163-178.
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  43. J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson (1987). Argumentation as Dialectical. Argumentation 1 (1):41-56.
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  44. J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson (1987). The Current State of Informal Logic. Informal Logic 9 (2).
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  45. Ralph H. Johnson (1987). The Blaze of Her Splendors: Suggestions About Revitalizing Fallacy Theory. [REVIEW] Argumentation 1 (3):239-253.
    Criticisms of fallacy theory have been lodged from many different directions. In this paper, I consider the classic criticism of incompleteness by DeMorgan, Finocchiaro's claim that fallacies probably exist only in the mind of the interpreter, McPeck's claim that fallacies are at best context-dependent and Paul's complaints about the teaching of fallacies. I seek not merely to defend fallacy theory against unfair criticisms but also to learn from the criticisms what can be done in order to make fallacy theory a (...)
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  46. Ralph H. Johnson & J. Anthony Blair (1985). Informal Logic: The Past Five Years 1978-1983. American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (3):181 - 196.
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  47. Ralph H. Johnson (1984). Charity Begins at Home. Informal Logic 3 (3).
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  48. Ralph H. Johnson (1984). Dwight Bolinger, Language: The Loaded Weapon Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 4 (6):233-235.
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  49. J. Anthony Blair & Ralph H. Johnson (1981). Informal Logic: The First International Symposium. Philosophy and Rhetoric 14 (4):251-253.
     
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