Search results for 'Ralph H. Moon' (try it on Scholar)

21 found
Sort by:
  1. Ralph H. Moon (1983). Correction of the Semantics for ${\Rm S}4.03$ and a Note on Literal Disjunctive Symmetry. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 24 (3):337-345.score: 870.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. F. H. Stubbings & B. E. Moon (1958). Mycenaean Civilization, Publications Since 1935. Journal of Hellenic Studies 78:151.score: 280.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. F. H. Stubbings & B. E. Moon (1963). Mycenaean Civilization, Publications 1956-60: A Second Bibliography. Journal of Hellenic Studies 83:200.score: 280.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. M. Ponder, H. Statham, N. Hallowell, J. A. Moon, M. Richards & F. L. Raymond (2008). Genetic Research on Rare Familial Disorders: Consent and the Blurred Boundaries Between Clinical Service and Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):690-694.score: 240.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Bill E. Lawson, Peter H. Hare, James Moor, Leslie Francis, Andrew Reck, Jaakko Hintikka, Stefan Bernard Baumrin, Leonard M. Fleck, Louisa Moon & Betsy Newell Decyk (forthcoming). Reports of APA Committees. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association.score: 240.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Clifford Allbutt (1924). Hippocrates Hippocrates. With English Translation by W. H. S. Jones, St. Catherine's College, Cambridge (Loeb Classical Library.) Vol. II. Pp. Lvi+336: London: Heinemann; New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1923. Hippocrates and His Successors in Relation to the Philosophy of Their Time. By R. O. Moon, M.D., F.R.C.P. The Fitzpatrick Lectures, R.C.P., 1921–22. London: Longmans, 1923. 6s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (7-8):175-177.score: 72.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. W. Schröder & H.-J. Treder (2002). Post-Newtonian Corrections in the Dynamics in the Earth–Moon System and Their Importance for the Relativistic Theories of Gravitation: A Historical Case Study. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 32 (1):177-186.score: 30.0
    As an example of a historical case study, some aspects of the post-Newtonian corrections in the Earth–Moon dynamics are described and discussed.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. W. Schröder & H. -J. Treder (2006). Aspects of the Mach–Einstein Doctrine and Geophysical Application (A Historical Review). Foundations of Physics 36 (6):883-901.score: 30.0
    The present authors have given a mathematical model of Mach's principle and of the Mach–Einstein doctrine about the complete induction of the inertial masses by the gravitation of the universe. The analytical formulation of the Mach–Einstein doctrine is based on Riemann's generalization of the Lagrangian analytical mechanics (with a generalization of the Galilean transformation) on Mach's definition of the inertial mass and on Einstein's principle of equivalence. All local and cosmological effects—which are postulated as consequences of Mach's principle by C. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. James H. Brown (2013). The Moon in the Nautilus Shell: Discordant Harmonies Reconsidered. [REVIEW] Bioscience 63 (8):686-687.score: 30.0
    Daniel B. Botkin, a professor emeritus of environmental studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a well-known global ecologist, has written a personal account of the current environmental issues of climate change, population dynamics, species extinction, and natural resource management. The Moon in the Nautilus Shell: Discordant Harmonies Reconsidered is a follow-up to his pivotal publication Discordant Harmonies: A New Ecology for the Twenty-First ways: rationally and spiritually. Botkin suggests that we confuse the two and hopes that (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Graham Harman (2011). The Road to Objects. Continent 3 (1):171-179.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. John G. Cramer, Anti-Gravity and Anti-Mass.score: 24.0
    One of the great and persistent technological dreams of science fiction has been the invention which would nullify or reverse the force of gravity. H. G. Wells in The First Men in the Moon did it in 1901 with Cavorite, a substance which shields objects behind it from gravitational lines of force. James Blish in the Cities in Flight series used the Spindizzy, a device which converts rotation and magnetism into gravity fields and forces. And, of course, "floaters", "null-g (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Daniel Graham (2007). The Sun's Light in Early Greek Thought. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 10:45-50.score: 24.0
    In the sixth century BCE Ionian philosophers explained the sun as a mass of fire, sometimes as floating like a leaf or a cloud above the earth. It was thought to be fueled by moist vapors from the earth. In the f i f t h century philosophers typically envisaged the sun as a red-hot stone or a molten mass carried around by the force of a cosmic vortex. The decisive shift in explanations seems to result from the cosmology of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Herbert H. Finch (1951). Book Review:Voyages to the Moon Marjorie Hope Nicolson. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 18 (2):172-.score: 24.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. David Prater (2013). Drift: A Way. Continent 3 (2):31-33.score: 24.0
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Stephen G. Brush & H. G. Van Bueren (1997). III, Fruitful Encounters: The Origin of the Solar System and the Moon From Chamberlin to Apollo. Annals of Science 54 (3):322-324.score: 24.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Eric H. Chudler (2007). The Power of the Full Moon. Running on Empty? In Sergio Della Sala (ed.), Tall Tales About the Mind and Brain: Separating Fact From Fiction. Oup Oxford. 401.score: 24.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Samantha Mei-che Pang, Aiko Sawada, Emiko Konishi, Douglas P. Olsen, L. H. Philip, Moon-fai Chan & Naoya Mayumi (2003). A Comparative Study of Chinese, American and Japanese Nurses' Perceptions of Ethical Role Responsibilities. Nursing Ethics 10 (3):295-311.score: 24.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Michelene T. H. Chi, Rod D. Roscoe, James D. Slotta, Marguerite Roy & Catherine C. Chase (2012). Misconceived Causal Explanations for Emergent Processes. Cognitive Science 36 (1):1-61.score: 12.0
    Studies exploring how students learn and understand science processes such as diffusion and natural selection typically find that students provide misconceived explanations of how the patterns of such processes arise (such as why giraffes’ necks get longer over generations, or how ink dropped into water appears to “flow”). Instead of explaining the patterns of these processes as emerging from the collective interactions of all the agents (e.g., both the water and the ink molecules), students often explain the pattern as being (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Mark H. Bickhard, Why Children Don't Have to Solve the Frame Problems.score: 12.0
    We all believe an unbounded number of things about the way the world is and about the way the world works. For example, I believe that if I move this book into the other room, it will not change color -- unless there is a paint shower on the way, unless I carry an umbrella through that shower, and so on; I believe that large red trucks at high speeds can hurt me, that trucks with polka dots can hurt me, (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Nathalie I. H. Wellens, Koen Milisen, Johan Flamaing & Philip Moons (2012). Methods to Assess the Reliability of the interRAI Acute Care: A Framework to Guide Clinimetric Testing. Part II. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (4):822-827.score: 8.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation