Search results for 'Ralph Marcus' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ralph Marcus (1945). Book Review:Early Pythagorean Politics in Practice and Theory. Edwin L. Minar, Jr. [REVIEW] Ethics 55 (3):232-.score: 240.0
  2. Ruth Barcan Marcus, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Diana Raffman & Nicholas Asher (eds.) (1995). Modality, Morality, and Belief: Essays in Honor of Ruth Barcan Marcus. Cambridge University Press.score: 210.0
    Modality, morality and belief are among the most controversial topics in philosophy today, and few philosophers have shaped these debates as deeply as Ruth Barcan Marcus. Inspired by her work, a distinguished group of philosophers explore these issues, refine and sharpen arguments and develop new positions on such topics as possible worlds, moral dilemmas, essentialism, and the explanation of actions by beliefs. This 'state of the art' collection honours one of the most rigorous and iconoclastic of philosophical pioneers.
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  3. Ruth B. Marcus (1962). On the Paper of Ruth B. Marcus. Synthese 14 (2/3):132 - 143.score: 180.0
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  4. E. Mary Smallwood (1964). Ralph Marcus, Allen Wikgren: Josephus: Jewish Antiquities. With an English Translation. Vol. Viii (Books Xv–Xvii). (Loeb Classical Library.) Pp. X+589. London: Heinemann, 1963. Cloth, 18s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 14 (02):215-.score: 150.0
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  5. W. W. Tarn (1944). The Loeb Josephus Josephus. With an English Translation by Ralph Marcus. Vol. VII: Jewish Antiquities, Books XII-XIV. (Loeb Classical Library.) Pp. Viii + 788. London: Heinemann, 1943. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 58 (01):22-23.score: 150.0
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  6. W. W. Tarn (1935). Josephus: Jewish Antiquities. Books V-VIII. With an English Translation by the Late H. St. J. Thackeray and Ralph Marcus. Pp. Ix+811. (Loeb Classical Library.) London: Heinemann (Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press), 1934. Cloth, 10s. (Leather, 12s. 6d.). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 49 (01):39-.score: 150.0
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  7. W. W. Tarn (1938). Josephus: Jewish Antiquities. Books IX–XI. With an English Translation by Ralph Marcus. Pp. Xi + 532. (Loeb Classical Library.) London: Heinemann, 1937. Cloth, 10s. (Leather, 12s. 6d.). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (02):84-.score: 150.0
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  8. Arthur Darby Nock (1955). Philo, Supplement: I. Questions and Answers on Genesis; II. Questions and Answers on Exodus. Translated From the Ancient Armenian Version of the Original Greek by Ralph Marcus. 2 Vols. Pp. Xx+551; Viii+307. London: Heinemann, 1953. Cloth, 15s. Net. Each. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 5 (01):107-108.score: 150.0
  9. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1980). Moral Dilemmas and Consistency. Journal of Philosophy 77 (3):121-136.score: 60.0
    Marcus argues that moral dilemmas are real, but that they are not the result of inconsistent moral principles. Moral principles are consistent just in case there is some world where all principles are 'obeyable.' They are inconsistent just in case there is no world where all are 'obeyable.' What this logical point is meant to show is that moral dilemmas do not make moral codes inconsistent. She also discusses guilt, and argues that guilt is still appropriate even in cases (...)
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  10. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1961/1993). Modalities: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Based on her earlier ground-breaking axiomatization of quantified modal logic, the papers collected here by the distinguished philosopher Ruth Barcan Marcus cover much ground in the development of her thought, spanning from 1961 to 1990. The first essay here introduces themes initially viewed as iconoclastic, such as the necessity of identity, the directly referential role of proper names as "tags", the Barcan Formula about the interplay of possibility and existence, and alternative interpretations of quantification. Marcus also addresses the (...)
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  11. Alan Ross Anderson, Ruth Barcan Marcus, R. M. Martin & Frederic B. Fitch (eds.) (1975). The Logical Enterprise. Yale University Press.score: 60.0
    Metaphysics and language: Quine, W. V. O. On the individuation of attributes. Körner, S. On some relations between logic and metaphysics. Marcus, R. B. Does the principle of substitutivity rest on a mistake? Van Fraassen, B. C. Platonism's pyrrhic victory. Martin, R. M. On some prepositional relations. Kearns, J. T. Sentences and propositions.--Basic and combinatorial logic: Orgass, R. J. Extended basic logic and ordinal numbers. Curry, H. B. Representation of Markov algorithms by combinators.--Implication and consistency: Anderson, A. R. Fitch (...)
     
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  12. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1998). Quentin Smith. In J. H. Fetzer & P. Humphreys (eds.), The New Theory of Reference: Kripke, Marcus, and its Origins. Kluwer. 3.score: 60.0
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  13. Eric Marcus (2004). Why Zombies Are Inconceivable. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (3):477-90.score: 30.0
    I argue that zombies are inconceivable. More precisely, I argue that the conceivability-intuition that is used to demonstrate their possibility has been misconstrued. Thought experiments alleged to feature zombies founder on the fact that, on the one hand, they _must_ involve first-person imagining, and yet, on the other hand, _cannot_. Philosophers who take themselves to have imagined zombies have unwittingly conflated imagining a creature who lacks consciousness with imagining a creature without also imagining the consciousness it may or may not (...)
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  14. Russell Goodman, Ralph Waldo Emerson. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 24.0
    An American essayist, poet, and popular philosopher, Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–82) began his career as a Unitarian minister in Boston, but achieved worldwide fame as a lecturer and the author of such essays as “Self-Reliance,” “History,” “The Over-Soul,” and “Fate.” Drawing on English and German Romanticism, Neoplatonism, Kantianism, and Hinduism, Emerson developed a metaphysics of process, an epistemology of moods, and an “existentialist” ethics of self-improvement. He influenced generations of Americans, from his friend Henry David Thoreau to John Dewey, (...)
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  15. Catherine Osborne (2011). Ralph Cudworth's The True Intellectual System of the Universe and the Presocratic Philosophers. In Oliver Primavesi & Katharina Luchner (eds.), The Presocratics from the Latin Middle Ages to Hermann Diels. Steiner Verlag.score: 24.0
    Ralph Cudworth (1617-88) was one of the Cambridge Platonists. His major work, The True Intellectual System of the Universe, was completed in 1671, a year after Spinoza published (anonymously) the Tractatus Logico-philosophicus. It was published a few years later, in 1678. Cudworth offers a spirited attack against the materialism and mechanism of Thomas Hobbes. His work is couched as a search for truth among the ancient philosophers, and this paper examines his use of the Presocratics as a tool for (...)
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  16. Eva-Maria Engelen (1996). Review On: Ruth Barcan Marcus, Modalities. Philosophical Essays, New York/Oxford (Oxford University Press) 1993. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 44 (1):125-128.score: 24.0
    The great contribution Marcus has made to several of intensely discussed topics in philosophy might not have been noticed fully without this collection of some of her most important articles that makes it evident that her achievement is not limited to inventing the famous Barcan formula.
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  17. Christopher W. Tindale (2002). A Concept Divided: Ralph Johnson's Definition of Argument. [REVIEW] Argumentation 16 (3):299-309.score: 24.0
    Ralph Johnson's Manifest Rationality (2000) is a major contribution to the field of informal logic, but the concept of argument that is central to its project suffers from a tension between the components that comprise it. This paper explores and addresses that tension by examining the implications of each of five aspects of the definition of ‘argument’.
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  18. Philip Hefner (2014). Ralph Burhoe: Reconsidering the Man and His Vision of Yoking Religion and Science. Zygon 49 (3):629-641.score: 24.0
    Ralph Wendell Burhoe was a leading figure in relating religion and science in the second half of the twentieth century. His autodidactic style and character as a public intellectual resulted in a vision that is comprehensive in its concern for the salvation of society. He does not fit easily into academic frameworks, even though he has been influential upon scholars who work in academia. This article discusses some conundrums posed by his work. There are also brief presentations of the (...)
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  19. Author unknown, Ralph Cudworth. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
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  20. Katri Käsper (2008). Ralph Wedgwood, The Nature of Normativity. [REVIEW] Studia Philosophica Estonica 1 (1):118-121.score: 21.0
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  21. Anna Zhyrkova (2012). Book Review: Marcus Plested. Orthodox Readings of Aquinas. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2012. [REVIEW] Forum Philosophicum 17 (2):273-278.score: 21.0
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  22. Marcus Aurelius (1989/2008). The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    This new edition brings Farquharson's authoritative 1944 translation up to date and includes a helpful introduction and notes for the student and general reader. Rutherford includes a selection of letters from Marcus to his tutor Fronto--most of which date from his earlier years--that offer personal detail and help to fill out the somber portrait of the emperor that is found in the Meditations.
     
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  23. Eric Marcus (2006). Intentionalism and the Imaginability of the Inverted Spectrum. Philosophical Quarterly 56 (224):321-339.score: 20.0
    There has been much written in recent years about whether a pair of subjects could have visual experiences that represented the colors of objects in their environment in precisely the same way, despite differing significantly in what it was like to undergo them, differing that is, in their qualitative character. The possibility of spectrum inversion has been so much debated1 in large part because of the threat that it would pose to the more general doctrine of Intentionalism, according to which (...)
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  24. Rutharcan B. Marcus (1990). Some Revisionary Proposals About Belief and Believing. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:133-153.score: 20.0
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  25. Ruth Barcan Marcus (1995). The Anti-Naturalism of Some Language-Centered Accounts of Beliefs. Dialectica 49 (2-4):113-30.score: 20.0
     
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  26. John Schwenkler (forthcoming). Rational Causation, by Eric Marcus. [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy.score: 18.0
    This is an excellent book that deserves careful attention from anyone whose work touches on issues in the philosophy of mind and action. In it, Marcus challenges the dominant philosophical conception of the mind’s place in nature, according to which mentalistic explanations hold true only when mental states or events cause things to happen in the same way as physical states and events do. Against this conception, Marcus argues that mental causation is utterly dissimilar to most of the (...)
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  27. Anderson Weekes (2006). The Many Streams in Ralph Pred’s Onflow: A Review Essay. Chromatikon II. Annuaire de la Philosophie En Procès - Yearbook of Philosophy in Process 2:229-246.score: 18.0
    This study of Ralph Pred’s Onflow (MIT Press, 2005) expands on Pred’s arguments and raises doubts about the viability of phenomenology. Showing that Pred’s method is indeed phenomenological, I validate his interpretations of William James as phenomenologist and his critique of John Searle in light of James, which documents the extent to which the role of habit in the constitution of experience is neglected by philosophers. In explaining habit, however, Pred himself reverts to non-phenomenological models drawn from James’ postulate (...)
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  28. Matteo Mameli & David Papineau (2006). The New Nativism: A Commentary on Gary Marcus's The Birth of the Mind. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 21 (4):559-573.score: 18.0
    Gary Marcus has written a very interesting book about mental development from a nativist perspective. For the general readership at which the book is largely aimed, it will be interesting because of its many informative examples of the development of cognitive structures and because of its illuminating explanations of ways in which genes can contribute to these developmental processes. However, the book is also interesting from a theoretical point of view. Marcus tries to make nativism compatible with the (...)
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  29. Quentin Smith (1995). Marcus, Kripke, and the Origin of the New Theory of Reference. Synthese 104 (2):179 - 189.score: 18.0
    In this paper, presented at an APA colloquium in Boston on December 28, 1994, it is argued that Ruth Barcan Marcus' 1961 article on Modalities and Intensional Languages originated many of the key ideas of the New Theory of Reference that have often been attributed to Saul Kripke and others. For example, Marcus argued that names are directly referential and are not equivalent to contingent descriptions, that names are rigid designators, and that identity sentences with co-referring names are (...)
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  30. Jc Beall (2001). The New Theory of Reference: Kripke, Marcus, and its Origins. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (2):308 – 309.score: 18.0
    Book Information The New Theory of Reference: Kripke, Marcus, and Its Origins. Edited by Paul Humphreys and James Fetzer. Kluwer Academic Publishers. Boston. Pp. xiii + 290. Hardback, US$105.
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  31. Harold B. Jones (2010). Marcus Aurelius, the Stoic Ethic, and Adam Smith. Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):89 - 96.score: 18.0
    In The Theory of Moral Sentiments (TMS) Adam Smith draws on the Stoic idea of a Providence that uses everything for the good of the whole. The process is often painful, so the Stoic ethic insisted on conscious cooperation. Stoic ideas contributed to the rise of science and enjoyed wide popularity in Smith's England. Smith was more influenced by the Stoicism of his professors than by the Epicureanism of Hume. In TMS, Marcus Aurelius's "helmsman" becomes the "impartial spectator," who (...)
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  32. Ralph Waldo Emerson (1884). The Correspondence of Thomas Carlyle and Ralph Waldo Emerson, 1834-1872, Vol. I. unknown.score: 18.0
    This is an important book historically, documenting the long friendship and correspondence of Emerson and Carlyle. It should be noted that there is a more up-to-date edition, done in the 20th century (edited by Joseph Slater, Columbia U.P. 1964). Many of the common themes and interests of the two thinkers are indicated in the correspondence, and often enough, one can also see evidence of the differences and how they approached them.
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  33. Catarina Dutilh Novaes (2006). Ralph Strode's Obligationes: The Return of Consistency and the Epistemic Turn. Vivarium 44 (s 2-3):338-374.score: 18.0
    In what follows, I analyze Ralph Strode's treatise on obligations. I have used a hitherto unpublished edition of the text (based on 14 manuscripts) made by Prof. E.J. Ashworth. I first give a brief description of Strode's text, which is all the more necessary given that it is not available to the average reader; I also offer a reconstruction of the rules proposed by Strode, following the style of reconstruction used in my analysis of Burley's and Swyneshed's rules elsewhere—that (...)
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  34. Quentin Smith (1995). Marcus and the New Theory of Reference: A Reply to Scott Soames. Synthese 104 (2):217 - 244.score: 18.0
    This paper is a reply to some of Scott Soames' comments on my colloquium paper Marcus, Kripke, and the Origin of the New Theory of Reference. Except for the indicated parts added in May, 1995, this paper was written on December 16th–25th, 1994 as my reply to Soames for the APA colloquium in Boston, December 28, 1994. In this paper, I argue that Soames' contention that Marcus is not one of the primary founders of contemporary (...)
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  35. Marcus Giaquinto & Jeremy Avigad, By Marcus Giaquinto.score: 18.0
    Published in 1891, Edmund Husserl’s first book, Philosophie der Arithmetik, aimed to “prepare the scientific foundations for a future construction of that discipline.” His goals should seem reasonable to contemporary philosophers of mathematics: . . . through patient investigation of details, to seek foundations, and to test noteworthy theories through painstaking criticism, separating the correct from the erroneous, in order, thus informed, to set in their place new ones which are, if possible, more adequately secured. [7, p. 5]2 But the (...)
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  36. Mark P. O. Morford (2002). The Roman Philosophers: From the Time of Cato the Censor to the Death of Marcus Aurelius. Routledge.score: 18.0
    Mark Morford provides a lively, succinct, and comprehensive survey of the philosophers of the Roman World, from Cato the Censor in 155 BCE to the death of Marcus Aurelius in 180 CE. These men were asking philosophical questions whose answers had practical effects on people's lives in antiquity--and still do today--yet this is an era of philosophy somewhat neglected in recent decades. Morford puts this right by discussing the writings and ideas of numerous famous and lesser-known figures. Using extensive (...)
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  37. Vince Brewton, Ralph Waldo Emerson. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 18.0
    In his lifetime, Ralph Waldo Emerson became the most widely known man of letters in America, establishing himself as a prolific poet, essayist, popular lecturer, and an advocate of social reforms who was nevertheless suspicious of reform and reformers. Emerson achieved some reputation with his verse, corresponded with many of the leading intellectual and artistic figures of his day, and during an off and on again career as a Unitarian minister, delivered and later published a number of controversial sermons. (...)
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  38. Marcus Aurelius, Thoughts of Marcus Aurelius.score: 18.0
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  39. Benjamin Carter (2010). Ralph Cudworth and the Theological Origins of Consciousness. History of the Human Sciences 23 (3):29-47.score: 18.0
    The English Neoplatonic philosopher Ralph Cudworth introduced the term ‘consciousness’ into the English philosophical lexicon. Cudworth uses the term to define the form and structure of cognitive acts, including acts of freewill. In this article I highlight the important role of theological disputes over the place and extent of human freewill within an overarching system of providence. Cudworth’s intellectual development can be understood in the main as an increasingly detailed and nuanced reaction to the strict voluntarist Calvinism that is (...)
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  40. Nigel J. T. Thomas (1997). A Stimulus to the Imagination: A Review of Questioning Consciousness: The Interplay of Imagery, Cognition and Emotion in the Human Brain by Ralph D. Ellis. [REVIEW] Psyche 3 (4).score: 18.0
    Twentieth century philosophy and psychology have been peculiarly averse to mental images. Throughout nearly two and a half millennia of philosophical wrangling, from Aristotle to Hume to Bergson, images (perceptual and quasi-perceptual experiences), sometimes under the alias of "ideas", were almost universally considered to be both the prime contents of consciousness, and the vehicles of cognition. The founding fathers of experimental psychology saw no reason to dissent from this view, it was commonsensical, and true to the lived experience of conscious (...)
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  41. Tristram McPherson (2009). Unnatural Normativity? Critical Notice of Ralph Wedgwood's Nature of Normativity. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 50 (2):63-82.score: 18.0
    Ralph Wedgwood’s The Nature of Normativity significantly advances our understanding of metaethical realism. After briefly reviewing the overall structure of Wedgwood’s argument for a Platonist realism about normativity, this critical notice focuses on three of the central metaphysical and epistemological claims that he defends. I first explain and raise difficulties for Wedgwood’s core claim that the intentional is normative. I then argue that his innovative attempt to finesse the supervenience problem that faces metaethical Platonists fails. Finally, I critically examine (...)
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  42. Christoph Schuringa (2013). Nihilistisches Geschichtsdenken: Nietzsches Perspektivische Genealogie by Marcus Andreas Born. [REVIEW] Journal of Nietzsche Studies 44 (1):126-128.score: 18.0
    As early as 1941, George Allen Morgan wrote that Nietzsche’s thought is “saturated with the historical point of view.” It is breathtaking how long it has taken scholarly writing on Nietzsche to catch up with Morgan and pay this aspect of Nietzsche’s thought the serious attention it deserves. Marcus Andreas Born’s study is therefore a very welcome development as a serious and engaged examination of Nietzsche’s “historical thought.” As his subtitle indicates, Born’s approach focuses on Nietzsche’s concept of genealogy. (...)
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  43. Marcus Aurelius (1993). The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius. Shambhala.score: 18.0
    All the notes to the Farquharson translation, amplifying the twelve books of the "Meditations," are included in this volume.
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  44. Helen Harte & Mariann Jelinek (1999). Reviews: Managing the Unknowable: Strategic Boundaries Between Order and Chaos in Organizations, Ralph D. Stacey; Complexity and Creativity in Organizations, Ralph D. Stacey. [REVIEW] Emergence 1 (2):129-138.score: 18.0
    (1999). Reviews: Managing the Unknowable: Strategic Boundaries Between Order and Chaos in Organizations, Ralph D. Stacey; Complexity and Creativity in Organizations, Ralph D. Stacey. Emergence: Vol. 1, No. 2, pp. 129-138.
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  45. Eduardo R. Cruz (1995). Ralph Wendell Burhoe and the Two Cultures. Zygon 30 (4):591-612.score: 18.0
    Ralph Burhoe developed his proposals for a social reformation at a time when the “two cultures” debate was still active. It is suggested here that Burhoe, sharing with his contemporaries an understanding of culture that was Western and normative in character, overlooked the distinction between the culture of the elites and popular culture, and consequently between religion as presented by theologians and church officials and popular religion. Therefore, his proposals for the revitalization of traditional religions, even if implemented, would (...)
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  46. Graeme Forbes (2013). Marcus and Substitutivity. Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 28 (78):359-374.score: 18.0
    El artículo discute la formulación de Marcus del principio de sustituibilidad. Se apoyó en una noción de forma lógica en la que el análisis elimina algunos tipos problemáticos de contexto. Defiendo una formulación variante del principio en la cual los contextos problemáticos se acomodan por derecho propio.
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  47. Marcus Pound (2007). Leo Strauss and the Theologico-Political Problem. By Heinrich Meier, Translated by Marcus Brainard. Heythrop Journal 48 (4):662–664.score: 18.0
  48. Ralph E. Stedman (1939). The Meaning of the Humanities: Five Essays by Ralph Barton Perry and Others. Edited with an Introduction by Theodore Meyer Greene . (Princeton: Princeton University Press; London: Humphrey Milford. 1938. Pp. Vii + 178. Price $2.50; 11s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 14 (56):503-.score: 18.0
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  49. John Sellars, Marcus Aurelius in Contemporary Philosophy.score: 18.0
    Chapter synopsis: This chapter contains sections titled: Modern Readers of the Meditations The 19th Century The 20th Century Rehabilitating Marcus Further Reading References.
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  50. Geoff W. Adams (2012). Marcus Aurelius in the Historia Augusta and Beyond. Lexington Books.score: 18.0
    "This book examines the biography of the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius.
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