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  1. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2013). Verses Attributed to Bṛhaspati in the Sarvadarśanasaṃgraha: A Critical Appraisal. Journal of Indian Philosophy 41 (6):615-630.
    Sāyaṇa-Mādhava closed his exposition of the Cārvāka philosophy in his Sarva-darśana-saṃgraha, Chap. 1 by quoting 11 and a half verses, the authorship of all of which was attributed to Bṛhaspati, the eponymous founder of materialism in India. One of these verses is presumably taken from the Viṣṇupurāṇa. However, it is not Bṛhaspati but some demons, deluded by a Jain and a Buddhist monk, who say this. Bṛhaspati does not appear at all in this Purāṇa. Variant versions of the same story (...)
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  2. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2012). Svabhāvavāda and the Cārvāka/Lokāyata: A Historical Overview. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (6):593-614.
    svabhāva (own being) and yadṛchhā (chance, accident) are named as two different claimants among others as the first cause (jagatkāraṇa) in the ŚvUp. But in later works, such as Aśvaghoṣa’s poems, svabhāva is synonymous with yadṛchhā and entails a passive attitude to life. Later still, svabhāva is said to be inhering in the Lokāyata materialist system, although in which sense—cosmic order or accident—is not always clearly mentioned. Svabhāva is also a part of the Sāṃkhya doctrine and is mentioned in the (...)
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  3. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2011). Two Obscure Sanskrit Words Related to the Cārvāka: Pañcagupta and Kuṇḍakīṭa. Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (2):167-171.
    Two words, pañcagupta and kuṇḍakīṭa, are found in modern Sanskrit lexicons such as the Śabdakalpadruma, the Vācaspatya, the Sanskrit-Wörterbuch, and A Sanskrit English Dictionary. They are said to signify the Cārvāka philosophy and an expert in the Cārvāka philosophy respectively. Both the words have been taken from some twelfth-century Sanskrit kośas but no example of actual use is available. Nor do they occur in any earlier Sanskrit kośa, such as the Amarakośa and the Halāyudhakośa. The inference is that the words (...)
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  4. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2010). Commentators on the Cārvākasūtra: A Critical Survey. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (4):419-430.
    In spite of the fact that the mūla-text of the Cārvākasūtra is lost, we have some 30 fragments of the commentaries written by no fewer than four commentators, namely, Kambalāśvatara, Purandara, Aviddhakarṇa, and Udbhaṭa. The existence of other commentators too has been suggested, of whom only one name is mentioned: Bhāvivikta. Unfortunately no extract from his work is quoted anywhere. The position of the Cārvākas was nearer the Buddhists (who admitted both perception and inference) than any other philosophical system. But (...)
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  5. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2010). What the Cārvākas Originally Meant. Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (6):529-542.
    This essay proposes to review the problems of reconstructing and interpreting ancient texts, particularly philosophical commentaries, in the context of the Cārvāka/Lokāyata system of India. Following an overview of the Indian philosophical text tradition and the ontological and epistemological positions of the Cārvākas, three cases are discussed: (1) when there is no invariance in the text and the commentary, (2) when commentators differ among themselves in their interpretations, and (3) when contradictory interpretations are offered. The paper further discusses why certain (...)
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  6. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2002). Cārvāka Fragments: A New Collection. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 30 (6):597-640.
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  7. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (2002). CārvāKa Fragments: A New Collection. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 30 (6):597-640.
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  8. Ramkrishna Bhattacharya (1999). Paurandarasūtra Revisited. Journal of Indian Philosophy 27 (5):485-497.
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