39 found
Order:
See also:
Profile: Wilder Ramsey (University of California, Berkeley)
  1. Michael R. DePaul & William Ramsey (eds.) (1998). Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and its Role in Philosophical Inquiry. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Ancients and moderns alike have constructed arguments and assessed theories on the basis of common sense and intuitive judgments. Yet, despite the important role intuitions play in philosophy, there has been little reflection on fundamental questions concerning the sort of data intuitions provide, how they are supposed to lead us to the truth, and why we should treat them as important. In addition, recent psychological research seems to pose serious challenges to traditional intuition-driven philosophical inquiry. Rethinking Intuition brings together a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   131 citations  
  2. Michael DePaul & William Ramsey (eds.) (1998). Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and its Role in Philosophical Inquiry. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Ancients and moderns alike have constructed arguments and assessed theories on the basis of common sense and intuitive judgments. Yet, despite the important role intuitions play in philosophy, there has been little reflection on fundamental questions concerning the sort of data intuitions provide, how they are supposed to lead us to the truth, and why we should treat them as important. In addition, recent psychological research seems to pose serious challenges to traditional intuition-driven philosophical inquiry. Rethinking Intuition brings together a (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   78 citations  
  3.  96
    William Ramsey (2007). Representation Reconsidered. Cambridge University Press.
    This book critically examines the ways in which philosophers and cognitive scientists appeal to representations in their theories, and argues that there is...
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   34 citations  
  4. William Ramsey, Stephen P. Stich & David E. Rumelhart (1991). Philosophy and Connectionist Theory. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   48 citations  
  5.  53
    William Ramsey (forthcoming). Must Cognition Be Representational? Synthese:1-18.
    In various contexts and for various reasons, writers often define cognitive processes and architectures as those involving representational states and structures. Similarly, cognitive theories are also often delineated as those that invoke representations. In this paper, I present several reasons for rejecting this way of demarcating the cognitive. Some of the reasons against defining cognition in representational terms are that doing so needlessly restricts our theorizing, it undermines the empirical status of the representational theory of mind, and it encourages wildly (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  6. William Ramsey, Stephen P. Stich & J. Garon (1991). Connectionism, Eliminativism, and the Future of Folk Psychology. In William Ramsey, Stephen P. Stich & D. Rumelhart (eds.), Philosophical Perspectives. Lawrence Erlbaum 499-533.
  7.  40
    William Ramsey, Stephen P. Stich & D. M. Rumelhart (eds.) (1991). Philosophy and Connectionist Theory. Lawrence Erlbaum.
    The philosophy of cognitive science has recently become one of the most exciting and fastest growing domains of philosophical inquiry and analysis. Until the early 1980s, nearly all of the models developed treated cognitive processes -- like problem solving, language comprehension, memory, and higher visual processing -- as rule-governed symbol manipulation. However, this situation has changed dramatically over the last half dozen years. In that period there has been an enormous shift of attention toward connectionist models of cognition that are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   27 citations  
  8. Michael R. DePaul & William Ramsey (eds.) (1998). Rethinking Intuition: The Psychology of Intuition and Its Role in Philosophical Inquiry. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Students and scholars in both fields will find this book to be of great value.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  9. William Ramsey (1992). Prototypes and Conceptual Analysis. Topoi 11 (1):59-70.
    In this paper, I explore the implications of recent empirical research on concept representation for the philosophical enterprise of conceptual analysis. I argue that conceptual analysis, as it is commonly practiced, is committed to certain assumptions about the nature of our intuitive categorization judgments. I then try to show how these assumptions clash with contemporary accounts of concept representation in cognitive psychology. After entertaining an objection to my argument, I close by considering ways in which conceptual analysis might be altered (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  10. M. R. DePaul & William Ramsey (eds.) (1998). Rethinking Intuition. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield.
    Students and scholars in both fields will find this book to be of great value.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  11. William Ramsey (1997). Do Connectionist Representations Earn Their Explanatory Keep? Mind and Language 12 (1):34-66.
  12.  57
    William Ramsey, Stephen Stich & Joseph Garon (1990). Connectionism, Eliminativism and the Future of Folk Psychology. Philosophical Perspectives 4:499-533.
  13.  36
    William Ramsey (2010). How Not to Build a Hybrid: Simulation Vs. Fact-Finding. Philosophical Psychology 23 (6):775-795.
    In accounting for the way we explain and predict behavior, two major positions are the theory-theory and the simulation theory. Recently, several authors have advocated a hybrid position, where elements of both theory and simulation are part of the account. One popular strategy for incorporating simulation is to note that we sometimes assign mental states to others by performing cognitive operations in ourselves that mirror what has occurred in the target. In this article, I argue that this way of thinking (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  14.  80
    William Ramsey, Perception.
    Philosophical work on perception traditionally concerns whether perceptual acquaintance with things in the world is compatible with the possibility of illusions and hallucinations. Given that you cannot tell definitively if you are hallucinating, how are you ever acquainted with things like tomatoes, barns, collisions, colors, sounds, and odors?
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  96
    William Ramsey, Eliminative Materialism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Eliminative materialism (or eliminativism) is the radical claim that our ordinary, common-sense understanding of the mind is deeply wrong and that some or all of the mental states posited by common-sense do not actually exist. Descartes famously challenged much of what we take for granted, but he insisted that, for the most part, we can be confident about the content of our own minds. Eliminative materialists go further than Descartes on this point, since they challenge of the existence of various (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  81
    William Ramsey (2006). Multiple Realizability Intuitions and the Functionalist Conception of the Mind. Metaphilosophy 37 (1):53-73.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Keith Frankish & William Ramsey (eds.) (2012). The Cambridge Handbook of Cognitive Science. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Foundations: 1. History and core themes; 2. The representational theory of mind; 3. Cognitive architectures; Part II. Aspects of Cognition: 4. Perception; 5. Action; 6. Human learning and memory; 7. Reasoning and decision making; 8. Concepts; 9. Language; 10. Emotion; 11. Consciousness; Part III. Research Programs: 12. Cognitive neuroscience; 13. Evolutionary psychology; 14. Embodied, embedded, and extended cognition; 15. Animal cognition; Glossary.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  66
    William Ramsey & Stephen P. Stich (1990). Connectionism and Three Levels of Nativism. Synthese 82 (2):177-205.
    Along with the increasing popularity of connectionist language models has come a number of provocative suggestions about the challenge these models present to Chomsky's arguments for nativism. The aim of this paper is to assess these claims. We begin by reconstructing Chomsky's argument from the poverty of the stimulus and arguing that it is best understood as three related arguments, with increasingly strong conclusions. Next, we provide a brief introduction to connectionism and give a quick survey of recent efforts to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  38
    William Ramsey (1990). Where Does the Self-Refutation Objection Take Us? Inquiry 33 (December):453-65.
    Eliminative materialism is the position that common?sense psychology is false and that beliefs and desires, like witches and demons, do not exist. One of the most popular criticisms of this view is that it is self?refuting or, in some sense, incoherent. Hence, it is often claimed that eliminativism is not only implausible, but necessarily false. Below, I assess the merits of this objection and find it seriously wanting. I argue that the self?refutation objection is (at best) a misleading reformulation of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20.  25
    William M. Ramsey (2013). Bigotry and Religious Belief. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 94 (2):125-151.
    Attacks on religious doctrines are often characterized as a form of bigotry and traditional analyses of the concept support this view. I argue that regarding such attacks as bigotry is inconsistent with a variety of contemporary moral attitudes and social goals. I offer an improved account of when we should ascribe bigotry – one that is more coherent with views on tolerance and the importance of open debate. This account focuses upon the justification for hostile attitudes and also limits the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  38
    William Ramsey (2010). Review of Richard Menary (Ed.), The Extended Mind. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (12).
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  7
    William M. Ramsey (1989). Parallelism and Functionalism. Cognitive Science 13 (1):139-144.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23.  11
    William Ramsey (1996). Conceptual Analysis and the Connectionist Account of Concepts. In J. Ezquerro A. Clark (ed.), Philosophy and Cognitive Science: Categories, Consciousness, and Reasoning. Kluwer 35--57.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  22
    William Ramsey (2011). Stich and His Critics – Ed. Dominic Murphy and Michael Bishop. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (244):650-653.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. M. DePaul & W. Ramsey (1998). Minimal Intuition. In M. R. DePaul & William Ramsey (eds.), Rethinking Intuition. Lanham: Rowman and Littlefield
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  26. William Ramsey (1995). Rethinking Distributed Representation. Acta Analytica 10 (14):9-25.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  27.  22
    1Imre Balogh, Brian Beakley, Paul Churchland, Michael Gorman, Stevan Harnad, David Mertz, H. H. Pattee, William Ramsey, John Ringen, Georg Schwarz, Brian Slator, Alan Strudler & Charles Wallis (1990). Responses to 'Computationalism'. Social Epistemology 4 (2):155 – 199.
  28.  14
    William Ramsey (1994). Distributed Representation and Causal Modularity: A Rejoinder to Forster and Saidel. Philosophical Psychology 7 (4):453-61.
    In “Connectionism and the fats of folk psychology”, Forster and Saidel argue that the central claim of Ramsey, Stich and Garon (1991)—that distributed connectionist models are incompatible with the causal discreteness of folk psychology—is mistaken. To establish their claim, they offer an intriguing model which allegedly shows how distributed representations can function in a causally discrete manner. They also challenge our position regarding projectibility of folk psychology. In this essay, I offer a response to their account and show how their (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  1
    William Ramsey (1997). Do Connectionist Representations Earn Their Explanatory Keep? Mind and Language 12 (1):34-66.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  12
    William Ramsey (1992). Belief and Cognitive Architecture. Dialogue 31 (1):115-120.
  31.  12
    William Ramsey (2009). The Harmonic Mind: From Neural Computation to Optimality-Theoretic Grammar-Volume 1: Cognitive Architecture and Volume 2: Linguistic and Philosophical Implications. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 50 (3):172-184.
  32. Keith Frankish & William M. Ramsey (eds.) (2014). The Cambridge Handbook of Artificial Intelligence. Cambridge University Press.
    Artificial intelligence, or AI, is a cross-disciplinary approach to understanding, modeling, and creating intelligence of various forms. It is a critical branch of cognitive science, and its influence is increasingly being felt in other areas, including the humanities. AI applications are transforming the way we interact with each other and with our environment, and work in artificially modeling intelligence is offering new insights into the human mind and revealing new forms mentality can take. This volume of original essays presents the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. William Ramsey & Stephen Stich (1995). And Joseph Garon. In Cynthia Macdonald & Graham Macdonald (eds.), Connectionism: Debates on Psychological Explanation. Blackwell 311.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Keith Frankish & William Ramsey (eds.) (2012). The Cambridge Handbook of Cognitive Science. Cambridge University Press.
    Cognitive science is a cross-disciplinary enterprise devoted to understanding the nature of the mind. In recent years, investigators in philosophy, psychology, the neurosciences, artificial intelligence, and a host of other disciplines have come to appreciate how much they can learn from one another about the various dimensions of cognition. The result has been the emergence of one of the most exciting and fruitful areas of inter-disciplinary research in the history of science. This volume of original essays surveys foundational, theoretical, and (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. William Ramsey (2010). Hold Manufacturing : Why You May Be Wrong About What's Right. In Stephen E. Schmid (ed.), Climbing - Philosophy for Everyone: Because It's There. Wiley-Blackwell
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. W. Ramsey (1996). Investigating Common Sense Psychology. Communication and Cognition: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly Journal 29:91-120.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. William M. Ramsey (2009). Representation Reconsidered. Cambridge University Press.
    Cognitive representation is the single most important explanatory notion in the sciences of the mind and has served as the cornerstone for the so-called 'cognitive revolution'. This book, originally published in 2007, critically examines the ways in which philosophers and cognitive scientists appeal to representations in their theories, and argues that there is considerable confusion about the nature of representational states. This has led to an excessive over-application of the notion – especially in many of the fresher theories in computational (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. William M. Ramsey (2011). Representation Reconsidered. Cambridge University Press.
    Cognitive representation is the single most important explanatory notion in the sciences of the mind and has served as the cornerstone for the so-called 'cognitive revolution'. This book, originally published in 2007, critically examines the ways in which philosophers and cognitive scientists appeal to representations in their theories, and argues that there is considerable confusion about the nature of representational states. This has led to an excessive over-application of the notion – especially in many of the fresher theories in computational (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. William M. Ramsey (2010). Representation Reconsidered. Cambridge University Press.
    Cognitive representation is the single most important explanatory notion in the sciences of the mind and has served as the cornerstone for the so-called 'cognitive revolution'. This book, originally published in 2007, critically examines the ways in which philosophers and cognitive scientists appeal to representations in their theories, and argues that there is considerable confusion about the nature of representational states. This has led to an excessive over-application of the notion – especially in many of the fresher theories in computational (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography