14 found
Sort by:
  1. Chai-Youn Kim & Randolph Blake (2013). Revisiting the Perceptual Reality of Synesthetic Color. In Julia Simner & Edward Hubbard (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Synesthesia. Oxford University Press 283.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Suhkyung Kim, Randolph Blake & Chai-Youn Kim (2013). Is “Σ” Purple or Green? Bistable Grapheme-Color Synesthesia Induced by Ambiguous Characters. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):955-964.
    People with grapheme-color synesthesia perceive specific colors when viewing different letters or numbers. Previous studies have suggested that synesthetic color experience can be bistable when induced by an ambiguous character. However, the exact relationship between processes underlying the identity of an alphanumeric character and the experience of the induced synesthetic color has not been examined. In the present study, we explored this by focusing on the temporal relation of inducer identification and color emergence using inducers whose identity could be rendered (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Randolph Blake (2012). Binocular Rivalry and Stereopsis Revisited. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press
  4. Pierre Pica, Stuart Jackson, Randolph Blake & Nikolaus Troje (2011). Comparing Biological Motion in Two Distinct Human Societies. PLoS ONE 6 (12):e28391.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Randolph Blake, Duje Tadin, Kenith V. Sobel, Tony A. Raissian & Sang Chul Chong (2006). Strength of Early Visual Adaptation Depends on Visual Awareness. Pnas Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 103 (12):4783-4788.
  6. Frank Tong, Ming Meng & Randolph Blake (2006). Neural Bases of Binocular Rivalry. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (11):502-511.
  7. Randolph Blake & Chai-Youn Kim (2005). Psychophysical Strategies for Rendering the Normally Visible Invisible. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (8):381-388.
    What are the neural correlates of conscious visual awareness? Tackling this question requires contrasting neural correlates of stimulus processing culminating in visual awareness with neural correlates of stimulus processing unaccompanied by awareness. To contrast these two neural states, one must be able to erase an otherwise visible stimulus from awareness. This paper describes and critiques visual phenomena involving dissociation of physical stimulation and conscious awareness: degraded stimulation, visual masking, visual crowding, bistable figures, binocular rivalry, motion-induced blindness, inattentional blindness, change blindness (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Randolph Blake, Thomas J. Palmeri, Rene Marois & Chai-Youn Kim (2005). On the Perceptual Reality of Synesthetic Color. In Robertson, C. L. & N. Sagiv (eds.), Synesthesia: Perspectives From Cognitive Neuroscience. Oxford University Press
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Chai-Youn Kim & Randolph Blake (2005). Measuring Visual Awareness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (8):381-388.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Chai-Youn Kim & Randolph Blake (2005). Psychophysical Magic: Rendering the Visible 'Invisible'. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (8):381-388.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. David Alais & Randolph Blake (2002). Minimizing Rivalry in San Miniato. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (10):407-408.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Robert Sekuler, Scott Nj Watamaniuk & Randolph Blake (2002). Motion Perception. In J. Wixted & H. Pashler (eds.), Stevens' Handbook of Experimental Psychology. Wiley
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Robert Sekuler, Scott Nj Watamaniuk & Randolph Blake (2002). Perception of Visual Motion. Stevens Handbook of Experimental Psychology 1.
  14. G. Keith Humphrey & Randolph Blake (2001). Introduction. Brain and Mind 2 (1):1-4.