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Ravi Gomatam [12]Ravi V. Gomatam [3]
  1. Ravi Gomatam, Against “Position”.
    Although quantum theory is presented as a radically non classical theory in physics, it is an open secret that our present understanding of it is based on a conceptual base borrowed from classical physics, leading to the situation that all of the radical implications of quantum theory are expressed using terminology that, in other circumstances would be considered blatantly self contradictory. To give but a few examples: wave particle duality (one and the same ontological entity can be ascribed two mutually (...)
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  2. Ravi Gomatam, Commentary on Hodgson's Paper on Plain Person's Free Will.
    Hodgson formulates nine propositions that elaborate this plain person’s view of free will. He also offers detailed justifications that he hopes are philosophically and scientifically respectable. While Hodgson doesn't state anywhere what would count as a "scientifically respectable" proposition, he seems to expect that any scientific theory of consciousness and free will must fully account for his nine propositions, not just explain them away. Or, alternatively, any scientific theory of free will that is incompatible with his nine propositions cannot serve (...)
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  3. Ravi Gomatam, Niels Bohr's Interpretation and the Copenhagen Interpretation.
    The Copenhagen interpretation, which informs the textbook presentation of quantum mechanics, depends fundamentally on the notion of ontological wave-particle duality and a viewpoint called “complementarity”. In this paper, Bohr’s own interpretation is traced in detail and is shown to be fundamentally different from and even opposed to the Copenhagen interpretation in virtually all its particulars. In particular, Bohr’s interpretation avoids the ad hoc postulate of wave function ‘collapse’ that is central to the Copenhagen interpretation. The strengths and weakness of both (...)
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  4. Ravi Gomatam, Quantum Realism and Haecceity.
    Non-relativistic quantum mechanics is incompatible with our everyday or ‘classical’ intuitions about realism, not only at the microscopic level but also at the macroscopic level. The latter point is highlighted by the ‘cat paradox’ presented by Schrödinger. Since our observations are always made at the macroscopic level — even when applying the formalism to the microscopic level — the failure of classical realism at the macroscopic level is actually more fundamental and crucial.
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  5. Ravi V. Gomatam, Popper's Propensity Interpretation and Heisenberg's Potentia Interpretation.
    In other words, classically, probabilities add; quantum mechanically, the probability amplitudes add, leading to the presence of the extra product terms in the quantum case. What this means is that in quantum theory, even though always only one of the various outcomes is obtained in any given observation, some aspect of the non -occurring events, represented by the corresponding complex-valued quantum amplitudes, plays a role in determining the overall probabilities. Indeed, the observed quantum interference effects are correctly captured by the (...)
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  6. Ravi V. Gomatam, Ravi V. Gomatam, Ph.D.
    The attitude that ordinary language description of experience is in fact a description of the world is called “naïve realism.” There is an entire branch of modern Western philosophy that is devoted to critically examining the assumptions behind the everyday language we use to describe the macroscopic world in which we live and the validity of naïve realism as an adequate description of the world. This branch of philosophy is called “ordinary language philosophy.” Surprisingly, it has something in common with (...)
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  7. Ravi Gomatam, Book Review. [REVIEW]
    In this book, Mara Beller, a historian and philosopher of science, undertakes to examine why and how the elusive Copenhagen interpretation came to acquire the status it has. The book appears under the series ‘Science and Its Conceptual Foundations’. The first part traces in seven chapters the early major developmental phases of QT such as matrix theory, Born’s probabilistic interpretation, Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle and Bohr’s complementarity framework. Although the historical and scientific details are authentic, the author’s presentation in this part (...)
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  8. Ravi Gomatam, Physics and Commonsense.
    Broadly stated, naïve realism is the attitude that the form of our outer experiences directly and literally correspond to the structure of the real world underlying these experiences. Naïve realism permeates our everyday thinking about, and ordinary language description of, the macroscopic world. It has undeniable pragmatic justification. However, as Descartes recognized centuries ago, philosophically speaking, naïve realism requires a justification. Physicists, nevertheless, simply assume naïve realism in interpreting the laboratory observations realistically. Thus, physicists do not find the philosophical issues (...)
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  9. Ravi Gomatam (2007). Niels Bohr's Interpretation and the Copenhagen Interpretation—Are the Two Incompatible? Philosophy of Science 74 (5):736-748.
    The Copenhagen interpretation, which informs the textbook presentation of quantum mechanics, depends fundamentally on the notion of ontological wave-particle duality and a viewpoint called “complementarity.” In this paper, Bohr's own interpretation is traced in detail and is shown to be fundamentally different from and even opposed to the Copenhagen interpretation in virtually all its particulars. In particular, Bohr's interpretation avoids the ad hoc postulate of wave function ‘collapse' that is central to the Copenhagen interpretation. The strengths and weakness of both (...)
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  10. Graham Cairns-Smith, Thomas W. Clark, Ravi Gomatam, Robert H. Kane, Nicholas Maxwell, J. J. C. Smart, Sean A. Spence & Henry P. Stapp (2005). Commentaries on David Hodgson's "a Plain Person's Free Will&Quot;. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (1):20-75.
    REMARKS ON EVOLUTION AND TIME-SCALES, Graham Cairns-Smith; HODGSON'S BLACK BOX, Thomas Clark; DO HODGSON'S PROPOSITIONS UNIQUELY CHARACTERIZE FREE WILL?, Ravi Gomatam; WHAT SHOULD WE RETAIN FROM A PLAIN PERSON'S CONCEPT OF FREE WILL?, Gilberto Gomes; ISOLATING DISPARATE CHALLENGES TO HODGSON'S ACCOUNT OF FREE WILL, Liberty Jaswal; FREE AGENCY AND LAWS OF NATURE, Robert Kane; SCIENCE VERSUS REALIZATION OF VALUE, NOT DETERMINISM VERSUS CHOICE, Nicholas Maxwell; COMMENTS ON HODGSON, J.J.C. Smart; THE VIEW FROM WITHIN, Sean Spence; COMMENTARY ON HODGSON, Henry Stapp.
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  11. Ravi Gomatam (2005). Do Hodgson's Propositions Uniquely Characterize Free Will? Commentary on Hodgson's Paper on Plain Person's Free Will. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12:32-40.
    s view of free will. He also offers detailed justifications that he hopes are philosophically and scientifically respectable. While Hodgson doesn't state anywhere what would count as a "scientifically respectable" proposition, he seems to expect that any scientific theory of consciousness and free will must fully account for his nine propositions, not just explain them away. Or, alternatively, any scientific theory of free will that is incompatible with his nine propositions cannot serve as a possible framework for developing a scientific (...)
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  12. Ravi Gomatam (2005). Do Hodgson's Propositions Uniquely Characterize Free Will? Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (1):32-40.
     
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  13. Ravi Gomatam (2000). Mara Beller, Quantum Dialogue-The Making of a Revolution Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (6):390-392.
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  14. Ravi V. Gomatam (1999). Quantum Theory and the Observation Problem. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (11-12):11-12.
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  15. Ravi Gomatam, Complementarity — Did Bohr Miss the Boat?
    In part-1, I shall outline the principle details of Bohr’s interpretation. Bohr’s basic interpretive insight is ‘ quantum inseparability’ . Complementarity of phenomena and a “revision to our attitude towards physical explanation” then follow. Together , these can be said to constitute Bohr’s general viewpoint of ‘complementarity’. Bohr does not quite clearly spell out the content of these three ideas; I do.
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