Search results for 'Rawdon Waller' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christopher Mole, Corey Kubatzky, Jan Plate, Rawdon Waller, Marilee Dobbs & Marc Nardone (2007). Faces and Brains: The Limitations of Brain Scanning in Cognitive Science. Philosophical Psychology 20 (2):197 – 207.score: 240.0
    The use of brain scanning now dominates the cognitive sciences, but important questions remain to be answered about what, exactly, scanning can tell us. One corner of cognitive science that has been transformed by the use of neuroimaging, and that a scanning enthusiast might point to as proof of scanning's importance, is the study of face perception. Against this view, we argue that the use of scanning has, in fact, told us rather little about the information processing underlying face perception (...)
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  2. Sara Waller (ed.) (2010). Serial Killers: Philosophy for Everyone – Killing and Being, Ed. Sara Waller (Wiley-Blackwell: 2010), 129-140. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 180.0
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  3. Bruce N. Waller (2011). Against Moral Responsibility. MIT Press.score: 60.0
    In Against Moral Responsibility, Bruce Waller launches a spirited attack on a system that is profoundly entrenched in our society and its institutions, deeply rooted in our emotions, and vigorously defended by philosophers from ancient times to the present. Waller argues that, despite the creative defenses of it by contemporary thinkers, moral responsibility cannot survive in our naturalistic-scientific system. The scientific understanding of human behavior and the causes that shape human character, he contends, leaves no room for moral (...)
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  4. Randolph Clarke, Joshua Shepherd, John Stigall, Robyn Repko Waller & Chris Zarpentine (forthcoming). Causation, Norms, and Omissions: A Study of Causal Judgments. Philosophical Psychology:1-15.score: 30.0
    Many philosophical theories of causation are egalitarian, rejecting a distinction between causes and mere causal conditions. We sought to determine the extent to which people's causal judgments discriminate, selecting as causes counternormal events—those that violate norms of some kind—while rejecting non-violators. We found significant selectivity of this sort. Moreover, priming that encouraged more egalitarian judgments had little effect on subjects. We also found that omissions are as likely as actions to be judged as causes, and that counternormative selectivity appears to (...)
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  5. Robyn Repko Waller (2012). Beyond Button Presses: The Neuroscience of Free and Morally Appraisable Actions. The Monist 95 (3):441-462.score: 30.0
    What are the types of action at issue in the free will and moral responsibility debate? Are the neuroscientists who make claims about free will and moral responsibility studying those types of action? If not, can the existing paradigm in the field be modified to study those types of action? This paper outlines some claims made by neuroscientists about the inefficacy of conscious intentions and the implications of this inefficacy for the existence of free will. It argues that, typically, the (...)
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  6. C. D. Meyers & Sara Waller (2009). Psychological Investigations: The Private Language Argument and Inferences in Contemporary Cognitive Science. Synthese 171 (1):135-156.score: 30.0
    Some of the methods for data collection in experimental psychology, as well as many of the inferences from observed behavior or image scanning, are based on the implicit premise that language use can be linked, via the meaning of words, to specific subjective states. Wittgenstein’s well known private language argument (PLA), however, calls into question the legitimacy of such inferences. According to a strong interpretation of PLA, all of the elements of a language must be publicly available. Thus the meaning (...)
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  7. Bruce N. Waller (2003). A Metacompatibilist Account of Free Will: Making Compatibilists and Incompatibilist More Compatible. Philosophical Studies 112 (3):209-224.score: 30.0
    The debate over free will has pittedlibertarian insistence on open alternativesagainst the compatibilist view that authenticcommitments can preserve free will in adetermined world. A second schism in the freewill debate sets rationalist belief in thecentrality of reason against nonrationalistswho regard reason as inessential or even animpediment to free will. By looking deeperinto what motivates each of these perspectivesit is possible to find common ground thataccommodates insights from all those competingviews. The resulting metacompatibilist view offree will bridges some of the differencesbetween (...)
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  8. Bruce N. Waller (1978). Carnap and Quine on the Distinction Between External and Internal Questions. Philosophical Studies 33 (3):301 - 312.score: 30.0
  9. Bruce N. Waller (2003). Empirical Free Will and the Ethics of Moral Responsibility. Journal of Value Inquiry 37 (4):533-542.score: 30.0
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  10. Bruce N. Waller (2004). Neglected Psychological Elements of Free Will. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (2):111-118.score: 30.0
  11. Bruce N. Waller (2003). The Sad Truth: Optimism, Pessimism, and Pragmatism. Ratio 16 (2):189–197.score: 30.0
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  12. David S. Waller (2012). “Truth in Advertising”: The Beginning of Advertising Ethics in Australia. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (1):46-56.score: 30.0
    In Australia, as in many countries, the early advertising industry had a poor reputation for honesty. However, in 1920 ?truth in advertising? and raising ethical behavior became the focus of the Second Convention of Advertising Men of Australasia, held in Sydney. This was a major event in Australia's advertising history and was seen as a way to legitimize the industry in the eyes of those who doubted advertising's honesty. This paper will look at the Sydney Advertising Convention, with particular reference (...)
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  13. Bruce N. Waller (2004). Virtue Unrewarded: Morality Without Moral Responsibility. Philosophia 31 (3-4):427-447.score: 30.0
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  14. Kim Shyan Fam & David S. Waller (2003). Advertising Controversial Products in the Asia Pacific: What Makes Them Offensive? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 48 (3):237-250.score: 30.0
    The advertising of controversial products/services and the use of controversial images to "cut through the clutter" in the marketplace appears to be increasing around the world. However, apart from the general ethical issue regarding the deliberate use of controversial/offensive images for public viewing that may offend some people, it is important to determine what makes a controversial advertisement offensive? A questionnaire was distributed to 1014 students across four different countries in the Asia Pacific region to determine what type of products (...)
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  15. Lee F. Kerckhove & Sara Waller (1998). Fetal Personhood and the Sorites Paradox. Journal of Value Inquiry 32 (2):175-189.score: 30.0
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  16. Bruce N. Waller (2006). Denying Responsibility Without Making Excuses. American Philosophical Quarterly 43 (1):81 - 90.score: 30.0
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  17. David S. Waller (2002). Advertising Agency-Client Attitudes Towards Ethical Issues in Political Advertising. Journal of Business Ethics 36 (4):347 - 354.score: 30.0
    Political advertising has long been a target for criticism regarding unethical behaviour. This study looks at the attitudes of Australian advertising agency executives and politicians towards ethical issues relating to political advertising. A sample of 101 advertising agency executives and 46 federal politicians were compared and some attitudinal differences were found, which could be areas of tension in the agency-client relationship.
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  18. Jason Waller (2009). Leibniz on the Trinity and the Incarnation: Reason and Revelation in the Seventeenth Century (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (1):pp. 145-146.score: 30.0
  19. Bruce N. Waller (1997). What Rationality Adds to Animal Morality. Biology and Philosophy 12 (3):341-356.score: 30.0
    Philosophical tradition demands rational reflection as a condition for genuine moral acts. But the grounds for that requirement are untenable, and when the requirement is dropped morality comes into clearer view as a naturally developing phenomenon that is not confined to human beings and does not require higher-level rational reflective processes. Rational consideration of rules and duties can enhance and extend moral behavior, but rationality is not necessary for morality and (contrary to the Kantian tradition represented by Thomas Nagel) morality (...)
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  20. Kim-Shyan Fam, David S. Waller & Zhilin Yang (2009). Addressing the Advertising of Controversial Products in China: An Empirical Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (1):43 - 58.score: 30.0
    China is a country that has undertaken a great transformation since the late 1970' s, and among these changes, has seen a massive growth in the advertising industry with the influx of foreign advertisers, and the development of regional and global media, such as satellite television and the Internet. This has resulted in the Chinese people of all ages having a greater opportunity of exposure to different types of advertising, including the advertising of potentially controversial products, which could clash with (...)
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  21. Bruce N. Waller (1994). Noncognitivist Moral Realism. Philosophia 24 (1-2):57-75.score: 30.0
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  22. Bruce N. Waller (1996). Moral Commitment Without Objectivity or Illusion: Comments on Ruse and Woolcock. Biology and Philosophy 11 (2):245-254.score: 30.0
    Peter Woolcock, in Ruse's Darwinian Meta-Ethics: A Critique, argues that the subjectivist (nonobjectivist) Darwinian metaethics proposed by Michael Ruse (in Taking Darwin Seriously) cannot work, because the illusion of objectivity that Ruse claims is essential to morality breaks down when it is recognized as illusion, and there then remain no good reasons for acknowledging or following moral obligations. Woolcock, however, is mistaken in supposing that moral behaviour requires rational motivation. Ruse's Darwinian metaethical analysis shows why such objective support for morality (...)
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  23. Bruce N. Waller (1995). Abortion and in Vitro Fertilization. Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (1):119-128.score: 30.0
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  24. David Waller (1997). A Vegetarian Critique of Deep and Social Ecology. Ethics and the Environment 2 (2):187 - 197.score: 30.0
    For all their antagonism, deep and social ecology do share at least this much: a lack of interest in the issues of animal rights, animal welfare, and vegetarianism. I argue that this disinterest is inconsistent with deep and social ecology's practical programs and philosophical foundations. Furthermore, while they ignore the animals' case for special moral recognition, both schools nevertheless exploit our special feelings (pro and con) toward animals in order to advance their own agendas concerning nature.
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  25. Jason Waller (2009). Spinoza on the Incoherence of Self-Destruction. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (3):487 – 503.score: 30.0
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  26. John C. Waller (2001). Ideas of Heredity, Reproduction and Eugenics in Britain, 1800–1875. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (3):457-489.score: 30.0
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  27. Bruce N. Waller (1989). Uneven Starts and Just Deserts (Fatalism and Free Will). Analysis 49 (4):209-13.score: 30.0
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  28. Bruce N. Waller (1988). Hard Determinism and the Principle of Vacuous Contrast. Metaphilosophy 19 (1):65–69.score: 30.0
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  29. David Waller (2010). Language Literacy and Music Literacy: A Pedagogical Asymmetry. Philosophy of Music Education Review 18 (1):26-44.score: 30.0
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  30. Bruce N. Waller (1992). Moral Conversion Without Moral Realism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):129-137.score: 30.0
    People occasionally change their moral beliefs and principles, and they may experience such changes as occurring independently of their wishes. Moral realists argue that this phenomenon of moral conversion is evidence for moral realism, and against noncognitivism. However, contemporary noncognitivists can acknowledge such changes--including changes "against our wills"--and can account for the changes in a simpler and more plausible manner. If moral realism posits real moral facts to account for moral conversion the result will be an extreme and untenable inflation (...)
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  31. David Waller (1998). The Chicken and Her Egg. Mind 107 (428):851-853.score: 30.0
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  32. Bruce N. Waller (1986). The Virtues of Contemporary Emotivism. Erkenntnis 25 (1):61 - 75.score: 30.0
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  33. Bruce N. Waller & Robyn A. Repko (2007). Informed Consent: Good Medicine, Dangerous Side Effects. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (01):66-74.score: 30.0
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  34. Bruce Waller (1989). Denying Moral Responsibility: The Difference It Makes. Analysis 49 (1):44 - 47.score: 30.0
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  35. Bruce N. Waller (1999). Deep Thinkers, Cognitive Misers, and Moral Responsibility. Analysis 59 (264):223–229.score: 30.0
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  36. Bruce N. Waller (1987). Just and Nonjust Deserts. Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):229-238.score: 30.0
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  37. Robyn Repko Waller (2014). Revising Reasons Reactivity: Weakly and Strongly Sufficient Reasons for Acting. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):529-543.score: 30.0
    In Responsibility and Control: A Theory of Moral Responsibility John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza propose an account of moral responsibility according to which an agent is morally responsible for an action just when that action is the product of her own moderately reasons-responsive mechanism, where reasons-responsiveness is explained in terms of the mechanism’s regular reasons-receptivity and weak reasons-reactivity. In a review of Fischer and Ravizza’s book Mele contends that their weakly reasons-reactivity condition is inadequate, constructing a case in which, (...)
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  38. Bruce N. Waller (2007). Sincere Apology Without Moral Responsibility. Social Theory and Practice 33 (3):441-465.score: 30.0
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  39. Robyn Repko Waller (2013). The Threat of Effective Intentions to Moral Responsibility in the Zygote Argument. Philosophia (1):1-14.score: 30.0
    In Free Will and Luck, Mele presents a case of an agent Ernie, whose zygote was intentionally designed so that Ernie A-s in 30 years, bringing about a certain event E. Mele uses this case of original design to outline the zygote argument against compatibilism. In this paper I criticize the zygote argument. Unlike other compatibilists who have responded to the zygote argument, I contend that it is open to the compatibilist to accept premise one, that Ernie does not act (...)
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  40. Janet M. Dukerich, Mary J. Waller, Elizabeth George & George P. Huber (2000). Moral Intensity and Managerial Problem Solving. Journal of Business Ethics 24 (1):29 - 38.score: 30.0
    There is an increasing interest in how managers describe and respond to what they regard as moral versus nonmoral problems in organizations. In this study, forty managers described a moral problem and a nonmoral problem that they had encountered in their organization, each of which had been resolved. Analyses indicated that: (1) the two types of problems could be significantly differentiated using four of Jones' (1991) components of moral intensity; (2) the labels managers used to describe problems varied systematically between (...)
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  41. B. P. Minogue, G. Palmer-Fernandez, L. Udell & B. N. Waller (1995). Individual Autonomy and the Double-Blind Controlled Experiment: The Case of Desperate Volunteers. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (1):43-55.score: 30.0
    This essay explores some concerns about the quality of informed consent in patients whose autonomy is diminished by fatal illness. It argues that patients with diminished autonomy cannot give free and voluntary consent, and that recruitment of such patients as subjects in human experimentation exploits their vulnerability in a morally objectionable way. Two options are given to overcome this objection: (i) recruit only those patients who desire to contribute to medical knowledge, rather than gain access to experimental treatment, or (ii) (...)
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  42. Bruce N. Waller (2007). John-Christian Smith, VI, 1946-2006. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 80 (5):180 -.score: 30.0
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  43. Bruce N. Waller (2004). The Almost Invisible Ghost in the Moral Responsibility Machine. Journal of Philosophical Research 29 (February):255-266.score: 30.0
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  44. Bruce N. Waller (2002). The Psychological Structure of Patient Autonomy. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 11 (03):257-265.score: 30.0
  45. Bruce N. Waller (2004). Comparing Psychoanalytic and Cognitive-Behavioral Perspectives on Control. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 11 (2):125-128.score: 30.0
  46. Robyn Repko Waller, A Response to Some Conceptual and Scientific Threats to Compatibilist Free Will.score: 30.0
    The aim of this dissertation is to respond to a collection of conceptual and scientific threats to compatibilist accounts of free will, particularly reasons-responsive views. Compatibilists hold that free will is compatible with the truth of determinism. Some compatibilists also claim that some actual agent at least sometimes acts freely, where it is true that she acts freely in virtue of her satisfying a specific set of control and epistemic conditions. These conditions often include the possession of certain capacities, such (...)
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  47. Bruce N. Waller (1982). Determinism and Behaviorist Epistemology: A Conditioned Response to a Hinman Stimulus. Southern Journal of Philosophy 20 (4):513-532.score: 30.0
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  48. Bruce N. Waller (2005). Responsibility and Health. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 14 (02):177-188.score: 30.0
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  49. Bruce N. Waller (1992). A Response to Kane and Hocutt. Behavior and Philosophy 20 (1):83 - 87.score: 30.0
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  50. Bruce N. Waller (1984). Daniel Dennett on Responsibility. Southern Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):413-423.score: 30.0
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