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Raymond Martin [59]Raymond-M. Martin [2]
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Profile: Raymond Martin (Université de Fribourg)
  1. Raymond Martin, Empiricist Roots of Modern Psychology.
    From the thirteenth through the sixteenth centuries, European philosophers were preoccupied with using their newfound access to Aristotle’s metaphysics and natural philosophy to develop an integrated account, hospitable to Christianity, of everything that was thought to exist, including God, pure finite spirits (angels), the immaterial souls of humans, the natural world of organic objects (plants, animals, and human bodies) and inorganic objects. This account included a theory of human mentality. In the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, first in astronomy and (...)
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  2. Raymond Martin, The Value of Memory: Reflections on “Memento”.
    “You have to begin to lose your memory, if only in bits and pieces, to realize that memory is what makes our lives. Life without memory is no life at all, . . . Our memory is our coherence, our reason, our feeling, even our action. Without it, we are nothing.” – Luis Buñuel..
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  3. Raymond Martin, Eighteenth Century British Theories of Self & Personal Identity.
    1. In the Essay, Locke’s most controversial claim, which he slipped into Book IV almost as an aside, was that matter might think (Locke1975:IV.iii.6;540-1).i Either because he was genuinely pious, which he was, or because he was clever, which he also was, he tied the denial that matter might think to the claim that God’s powers are limited, thus, attempting to disarm his critics. It did not work. Stillingfleet and others were outraged. If matter can think, then for explanatory purposes (...)
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  4. Raymond Martin, Review. [REVIEW]
    In this extraordinarily rich and provocative book by an eminent intellectual historian and philosopher, Richard Sorabji argues persuasively that there was “an intense preoccupation” among ancient western thinkers with self and related notions. In the process, he provides fresh translations and often novel interpretations of the most important passages relevant to this contention in a host of thinkers, including Homer, Epicharmus, Heraclitus, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Chrysippus, Cicero, Lucretius, Seneca, Plutarch, Epictetus, Hierocles, Marcus Aurelius, Tertullian, Origen, Alexander of Aphrodisias, Plotinus, Porphyry, (...)
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  5. Raymond Martin (2013). The Early Modern Subject: Self-Consciousness and Personal Identity From Descartes to Hume. Grazer Philosophische Studien 86 (1):284-286.
     
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  6. John Barresi & Raymond Martin (2011). History as Prologue: Western Theories of the Self. In Shaun Gallagher (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Self. Oup Oxford.
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  7. Raymond Martin (2011). Review of Christian Smith, What is a Person? Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and the Moral Good From the Person Up. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (2).
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  8. Raymond Martin (2010). Describing Ourselves: Wittgenstein and Autobiographical Consciousness by Hagberg, Garry L. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (1):81-84.
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  9. Raymond Martin (2010). Let Many Flowers Bloom. History and Theory 49 (3):426-434.
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  10. Raymond Martin (2009). Modern PsycHology. In John Symons Paco Calvo (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge. 21.
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  11. Raymond Martin (2009). Would It Matter All That Much If There Were No Selves? In Mario D'Amato, Jay L. Garfield & Tom J. F. Tillemans (eds.), Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  12. Raymond Martin (2008). What Really Matters. Synthese 162 (3):325 - 340.
    What really matters fundamentally in survival? That question—the one on which I focus—is not about what should matter or about metaphysics. Rather, it is a factual question the answer to which can be determined, if at all, only empirically. I argue that the answer to it is that in the case of many people it is not one’s own persistence, but continuing in ways that may involve one’s own cessation that really matters fundamentally in survival. Call this the surprising result. (...)
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  13. Daniel Kolak & Raymond Martin (eds.) (2006). The Experience of Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    This exceptional anthology immerses students in such powerful ideas that they will find themselves not just reading about, but actually participating in, the kind of philosophical thinking that can change the way they look at their lives and the world around them. Now in a new edition, The Experience of Philosophy features eighty-five readings that challenge students' thinking about God, freedom, reality, nothingness, death, and their own identities. Provocative and accessible, these selections have been carefully chosen for their ability to (...)
     
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  14. Raymond Martin (2006). Do Historians Need Philosophy? History and Theory 45 (2):252–260.
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  15. John Barresi & Raymond Martin (2003). Self-Concern From Priestley to Hazlitt. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):499 – 507.
    himself or a proper object of his egoistic self-concern. Hazlitt concluded that belief in personal identity must be an acquired imaginary conception and that since in reality each of us is no more related to his or her future self than to the future self of any other person none of us is 2 ‘.
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  16. Raymond Martin (2003). God Matters: Readings in the Philosophy of Religion. Longman Publications.
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  17. Raymond Martin (2003). Historians on Miracles. In God Matters: Readings in the Philosophy of Religion. Longman Publications.
    Secular academic historians of religious subject matter often characterize their approach as objective, contrasting it with the approaches of religiously-oriented historians. On the assumption that the denial of a theological claim is itself a theological claim, I question this characterization. After a brief discussion of Spinoza and Hume on miracles, I survey the work of several secular, academic historians of the New Testament in order to illustrate how on the issue of miracles they are committed to theological conclusions in advance (...)
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  18. Raymond Martin (2003). Self-Concern From Priestley To Hazlitt. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):499-507.
    Toward the beginning of the 19th century, William Hazlitt, in An Essay on the Principles of Human Action, proposed a theory of personal identity and self-concern that is remarkably similar to Derek Parfit’s recent revisionist account.1 Hazlitt even asked in..
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  19. Raymond Martin & John Barresi (eds.) (2003). Personal Identity. Blackwell.
    These are the very scholars that were involved in initiating the revolution in personal identity theory.
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  20. Raymond Martin (2002). Clio Raped. History and Theory 41 (2):225–238.
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  21. Raymond Martin & John Barnes (eds.) (2002). Personal Identity. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  22. Raymond Martin (2001). The Kinds of Things. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):240-243.
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  23. Raymond Martin (2000). History as Moral Reflection. History and Theory 39 (3):405–416.
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  24. Raymond Martin (2000). Locke's Psychology of Personal Identity. Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (1):41-61.
    By attending just to conceptual analysis and metaphysics in connection with Locke's theory of personal identity, but ignoring psychology, one can know that, in Locke's view, consciousness via memory unifies persons over time, but not how consciousness unifies persons, either over time or at a time, nor why, for Locke, the mechanisms of self-constitution are crucially important to personal identity. In explaining Locke's neglected thoughts on the psychology of personal identity, I argue, first, that he was not trying to analyze (...)
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  25. Raymond Martin (2000). Narration, Objectivity, and Methodological Truth. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2000:133-144.
    In this essay, I argue that scientists and historians employ different strategies to overcome a common problem: subjectivity. The difference in their strategies is symptomatic of a fundamental difference between science and the humanities. It is that whereas physical scientists, in trying to be objective, aspire to the view from nowhere, humanistic historians, in trying to be objective, aspire to the views from everywhere.
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  26. Raymond Martin (2000). Naturalization of the Soul: Self and Personal Identity in the Eighteenth Century. Routledge.
    Naturalization of the Soul charts the development of the concepts of soul and self in Western thought, from Plato to the present. It fills an important gap in intellectual history by being the first book to emphasize the enormous intellectual transformation in the eighteenth century, when the religious 'soul' was replaced first by a philosophical 'self' and then by a scientific 'mind'. The authors show that many supposedly contemporary theories of the self were actually discussed in the eighteenth century, and (...)
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  27. Raymond Martin (1998). Causation and Persistence. International Philosophical Quarterly 38 (3):333-335.
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  28. Raymond Martin (1998). Progress in Historical Studies. History and Theory 37 (1):14–39.
    Everyone with their feet on the ground admits that in the physical sciences there has been progress. One can debate the niceties. The hard rock is that our ability to predict and control natural events and processes is greater now than it has ever been. And there has been astonishing technological fallout.
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  29. Raymond Martin (1998). Self-Concern: An Experiential Approach to What Matters in Survival. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a major contribution to the philosophical literature on the nature of the self, personal identity, and survival. Its distinctive methodology is one that is phenomenologically descriptive rather than metaphysical and normative. On the basis of this approach Raymond Martin shows that the distinction between self and other is not nearly as fundamental a feature of our so-called egoistic values as has been traditionally thought. He explains how the belief in a self as a fixed, continuous point of (...)
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  30. Raymond Martin (1998). Was Spinoza a Person? Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 64:111-118.
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  31. Raymond Martin, John Barresi & Alessandro Giovannelli (1998). Fission Examples in the Eighteenth and Early Nineteenth Century Personal Identity Debate. History of Philosophy Quarterly 15 (3):323 - 348.
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  32. Raymond Martin (1997). Paul Edwards. Reincarnation: A Critical Examination. Pp. 313. (Amherst, New York: Prometheus Books, 1996.). Religious Studies 33 (3):349-360.
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  33. Raymond Martin (1997). The Essential Difference Between History and Science. History and Theory 36 (1):1-14.
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  34. Raymond Martin (1996). R. W. K. Paterson, Philosophy and the Belief in a Life After Death. (London: Macmillan Press Ltd; New York: St Martin's Press, Inc., 1995.) Pp. V+223. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 32 (3):415.
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  35. Raymond Martin & John Baressi (1995). Hazlitt on the Future of the Self. Journal of the History of Ideas 56 (3).
    William Hazlitt's moment occurred in 1794, when he was sixteen years old. In that moment Hazlitt thought he realized three things: that we are naturally connected to ourselves in the past and present but only imagina-.
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  36. Raymond Martin & John Barresi (1995). Hazlitt on the Future of the Self. Journal of the History of Ideas 56 (468):61-100.
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  37. Raymond Martin (1994). G.B. Vico: The Making of an Anti-Modern. History of European Ideas 18 (6):1035-1037.
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  38. Raymond Martin (1994). The Rehabilitation of Myth: Vico'snew Science. History of European Ideas 18 (6):1033-1035.
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  39. Raymond Martin (1993). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Mind 102 (408):676-681.
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  40. Raymond Martin (1993). Having the Experience: The Next Best Thing to Being There. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 70 (3):305 - 321.
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  41. Raymond Martin (1993). Real Values: Why the Wilkes-Donagan Prohibition is Mistaken. Metaphilosophy 24 (4):400-406.
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  42. Daniel Kolak & Raymond Martin (eds.) (1992). The Experience of Philosophy (Second Edition). Belmont: Wadsworth.
    This exceptional anthology immerses students in such powerful ideas that they will find themselves not just reading about, but actually participating in, the kind of philosophical thinking that can change the way they look at their lives and the world around them. Now in a new edition, The Experience of Philosophy features eighty-five readings that challenge students' thinking about God, freedom, reality, nothingness, death, and their own identities. Provocative and accessible, these selections have been carefully chosen for their ability to (...)
     
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  43. Raymond Martin (1992). Survival of Bodily Death: A Question of Values. Religious Studies 28 (2):165 - 184.
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  44. Raymond Martin (1990). William H. Dray, On History and Philosophers of History Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 10 (9):359-361.
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  45. Raymond Martin (1988). Identity's Crisis. Philosophical Studies 53 (2):295 - 307.
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  46. Raymond Martin (1985). History and the Brewmaster's Nose. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 15 (2):253 - 272.
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  47. Raymond Martin (1983). Tracking Nozick's Sceptic: A Better Method. Analysis 43 (1):28 - 33.
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  48. Raymond Martin (1982). Mill on Liberty. Teaching Philosophy 5 (4):326-328.
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  49. Raymond Martin (1981). Beyond Positivism: A Research Program for Philosophy of History. Philosophy of Science 48 (1):112-121.
    It is argued that the debate over the positivist theory of historical explanation has made only a limited contribution to our understanding of how historians should defend the explanations they propose importantly because both positivists and their critics tacitly accepted two assumptions. The first assumption is that if the positivist analysis of historical explanation is correct, then historians ought to attempt to defend covering laws for each of the explanations they propose. The second is that unless a historian can justify (...)
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  50. Raymond Martin (1980). Explanatory Controversy in Historical Studies. In Peter van Inwagen (ed.), Time and Cause. D. Reidel. 219--235.
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