23 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Rebecca Bamford (Quinnipiac University)
  1. Keith Ansell-Pearson & Rebecca Bamford (forthcoming). Nietzsche’s Dawn: Philosophy as a Way of Living. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Rebecca Bamford (forthcoming). Ecce Homo: Philosophical Autobiography in the Flesh. In Duncan Large & Nicholas Martin (eds.), Nietzsche’s “Ecce Homo”. de Gruyter.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Rebecca Bamford (2014). Ethical Review of Health Systems Research: Vulnerability and the Need for Philosophy in Research Ethics. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (2):38-39.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Rebecca Bamford (2014). Getting Even More Specific About Physicians' Obligations: Justice, Responsibility, and Professionalism. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (9):46-47.
    (2014). Getting Even More Specific About Physicians’ Obligations: Justice, Responsibility, and Professionalism. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 14, No. 9, pp. 46-47.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Rebecca Bamford (2014). Mood and Aphorism in Nietzsche’s Campaign Against Morality. Pli: The Warwick Journal of Philosophy 25 (55-76).
  6. Rebecca Bamford (2014). The Liberatory Limits of Nietzsche’s Colonial Imagination in Dawn §206. In Barry Stocker & Manuel Knoll (eds.), Nietzsche as Political Philosopher. De Gruyter.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Rebecca Bamford (2013). Just How Cognitive is Emotion? The Continuing Importance of the Philosophy of Emotion in Enhancement Ethics. American Journal of Bioethics-Neuroscience 4 (1):18-19.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Rebecca Bamford (2013). Nietzsche and the Ancient Skeptical Tradition. Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (1):138-140.
    Jessica Berry provides the first detailed analysis of whether, and in what sense, Nietzsche was a skeptic (5). Exploring the affinity between Nietzsche’s work and Pyrrhonism in six main chapters, Berry differentiates between modern skepticism, understood as epistemological pessimism or nihilism (33), and Pyrrhonian skepticism as a commitment to continuing inquiry, based on the equipollence of arguments, “roughly equal persuasive weight for and against just about any claim,” and epochē, suspension of judgment (36–37). Berry shows that Nietzsche appreciated this distinction (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Rebecca Bamford (2012). Daybreak. In Paul C. Bishop (ed.), A Companion to Friedrich Nietzsche: Life and Works. Boydell & Brewer [Camden House].
    I provide a critical interpretation of Morgenröthe: Gedanken über die moralischen Vorurteile that identifies the key philosophical work done by Nietzsche in this text, as well as presenting the text as a type of medical narrative. I show how Nietzsche engages with three main questions, drawing thematic connections between themes of physical and psychological health and of ethics, in order to develop a foundation for his critical transvaluation project: First, what is the nature of, and relationship between psycho-physiological and cultural (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Rebecca Bamford, C. D. Brewer, Bayly Bucknell, Heather DeGrote, Loren Fabry, Madeleine E. M. Hammerlund & Bryan M. Weisbrod (2012). A Paradoxical Ethical Framework for Unpredictable Drug Shortages. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (1):16 - 18.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 1, Page 16-18, January 2012.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Rebecca Bamford (2011). Cultural Diversity, Families, and Research Subjects. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (5):33-34.
  12. Rebecca Bamford (2011). Reconsidering Risk to Women: Oocyte Donation for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (9):37-39.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 9, Page 37-39, September 2011.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Rebecca Bamford & Mark D. Tschaepe (2011). Biophysical Models of Human Behavior: Is There a Place for Logic. American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 2 (3):70-72.
    We present a two-pronged criticism of Ramos's argument. Our main contention is that the logic of the author’s argument is flawed. As we demonstrate, the author conflates probability with necessity, in addition to conflating free will having causal efficacy with the merely illusory conscious experience of free will; such conflations undermine the claim that individual free will should be both exhibited on a social scale and necessarily cause a particular organized pattern to emerge. In addition, we will show that the (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Rebecca Bamford (2009). Review of Diego von Vacano. The Art of Power: Machiavelli, Nietzsche, and the Making of Aesthetic Political Theory, (Lanham, Md.: Lexington Books, 2007). [REVIEW] Journal of Nietzsche Studies 38 (Fall).
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Rebecca Bamford (2009). The Art of Power: Machiavelli, Nietzsche, and the Making of Aesthetic Political Theory (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 38 (1):95-99.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Rebecca Bamford (2008). Letter From the Assistant Editor. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 36 (Autumn):86-87.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Rebecca Bamford (2008). Nietzsche's Philosophy of Religion (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 46 (3):pp. 488-490.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Rebecca Bamford (2007). Nietzsche and Ubuntu. South African Journal of Philosophy 26 (1):85-97.
    Here I argue that aspects of Nietzsche's thought may be productively compared with the role played by the concept of ubuntu in talk of cultural renaissance in South Africa. I show that Nietzsche respects and writes for humanity conceived of in a vital sense, thereby imagining a sense of authenticity that may prove significant to talk of cultural renaissance in South Africa. I question the view that Nietzsche is an individualist, drawing on debate between Conway (1990) and Gooding-Williams (2001), concerning (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Rebecca Bamford (2007). The Virtue of Shame: Defending Nietzsche’s Critique of Mitleid. In Gudrun von Tevenar (ed.), Nietzsche and Ethics. Peter Lang Verlag.
    I argue that moral intuitions about Nietzsche as an exemplar of practical cruelty can be overturned. My argument is based upon the possibility of abandoning the notion of pure and unmediated passivity as intrinsic to the phenomena of human suffering and of Mitleid, as identified by Nietzsche. I claim that wrongly identifying intrinsic passivity in the phenomenology of Mitleid and of suffering generates the moral sceptical intuition. Once this case of mistaken identity is uncovered, 1 suggest, there is no reason (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Rebecca Bamford (2006). Gilles Deleuze's "Difference and Repetition": A Critical Introduction and Guide (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 31 (1):61-62.
  21. Rebecca Bamford (2005). Nietzsche, Science, and Philosophical Nihilism. South African Journal of Philosophy 24 (4):241-259.
    Nietzsche offers us a critique of modern culture as threatened by a nihilistic crisis in values. Philosophy is specifically incorporated into Nietzsche's critique, resulting in the claim that modern philosophy, as well as modern culture, is nihilistic. But why should contemporary philosophers give this view credence? In this paper, I put forward some reasons to take Nietzsche's view seriously, focusing on the relationship between science and philosophy. I suggest that modern philosophy still tends to idealise science as an exemplar of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Rebecca Bamford (2005). The Nietzsche Diet and Dr Atkins’s Science. In Lisa Heldke, Kerri Mommer & Cynthia Pineo (eds.), The Atkins Diet and Philosophy. Open Court.
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Rebecca Bamford (2003). Nietzsche's Aestheticism and the Value of Suffering. In Paul Bishop & R. H. Stephenson (eds.), Cultural Studies and the Symbolic: Occasional Papers in Cassirer and Cultural Theory Studies, Presented at the University of Glasgow's Centre for Intercultural Studies. Northern Universities Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation