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Rebecca Dresser [93]Rebecca S. Dresser [3]
  1. Nancy Berlinger, Pauline W. Chen, Rebecca Dresser, Nancy Neveloff Dubler, Anne Lederman Flamm, Susan Gilbert, Mark A. Hall & Lisa H. Harris (forthcoming). Elizabeth Mitchell Armstrong is Asso. Hastings Center Report.
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  2. Larry R. Churchill & Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). J. Andrew Billings is the Director. Hastings Center Report.
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  3. I. Glenn Cohen & Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). Lisa Campo-Engelstein is an As. Hastings Center Report.
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  4. Lawrence Diller & Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). Julia C. Spring Works for The. Hastings Center Report.
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  5. Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). Advance Directives Implications for Policy. Hastings Center Report.
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  6. Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). At Law: A New Era in Drug Regulation? Hastings Center Report.
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  7. Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). At Law: Families and Forensic DNA Profiles. Hastings Center Report.
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  8. Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). At Law: Setting Priorities for Science Support. Hastings Center Report.
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  9. Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). At Law: Still Troubled: In Re Martin. Hastings Center Report.
     
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  10. Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). At Law: The Limits of Apology Laws. Hastings Center Report.
     
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  11. Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). Personal Knowledge and Study Participation. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101390.
    Scientists in earlier times considered personal research participation an essential component of their work. Exposing themselves to untested interventions was seen as the most ethical way to gauge the human response to those interventions. The practice was also educational, for it generated useful information that helped researchers plan subsequent human studies. Self-experimentation was eventually replaced by more comprehensive ethical codes governing human research. But it is time to bring back the practice of self-experimentation, albeit in modified form. Through serving as (...)
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  12. Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). Pre-Emptive Suicide, Precedent Autonomy and Preclinical Alzheimer Disease. Journal of Medical Ethics:2013-101615.
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  13. Rebecca Dresser (forthcoming). Schiavo's Legacy: The Need for an Objective Standard. Hastings Center Report.
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  14. Rebecca Dresser (2014). Edmund Pellegrino and the Art of Civilized Dialectics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (2):113-119.
    I turn first to a Journal of Medicine and Philosophy article Pellegrino published the year after he became chairman of the council. He was facing a new challenge in his long and stellar career. He appreciated the difficulties he would encounter in his new role, and this was an opportunity to consider what was ahead."Bioethics and Politics: ‘Doing Ethics’ in the Public Square" (2006) criticized what Pellegrino saw as a troubling turn in bioethics at that time. The article began with (...)
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  15. Rebecca Dresser (2014). Law, Ethics, and the Patient Preference Predictor. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (2):178-186.
    The Patient Preference Predictor (PPP) is intended to improve treatment decision making for incapacitated patients. The PPP would collect information about the treatment preferences of people with different demographic and other characteristics. It could be used to indicate which treatment option an individual patient would be most likely to prefer, based on data about the preferences of people who resemble the patient. The PPP could be incorporated into existing US law governing treatment for incapacitated patients, although it is unclear whether (...)
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  16. Rebecca Dresser (2013). A Terrifying Truth. Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics 3 (1):10-12.
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  17. Rebecca Dresser (2013). Drug Compounding, Drug Safety, and the First Amendment. Hastings Center Report 43 (2):9-10.
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  18. Rebecca Dresser (2013). Subversive Subjects: Rule‐Breaking and Deception in Clinical Trials. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 41 (4):829-840.
    Research subjects do not always conform to research requirements. When their personal interests conflict with the demands of participation, some subjects surreptitiously break the rules. These subjects are subversive — they undermine the research endeavor. In rejecting the restrictions research imposes, subversive subjects diminish the value of research results. From one vantage point, subversive subjects engage in unethical behavior. They create risks to themselves and others; they also disregard ethical responsibilities to adhere to research agreements and tell the truth. At (...)
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  19. Rebecca Dresser (2012). Alive and Well: The Research Imperative. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):915-921.
    Many features of the existing biomedical research enterprise rest on questionable judgments about the value of research. Policymakers and research ethicists make assumptions about research value that aren't necessarily warranted. A more balanced view of research value could contribute to more defensible decisions about research policy and practice.
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  20. Rebecca Dresser (2012). A Status Elevation for Great Apes. Hastings Center Report 42 (2):10-11.
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  21. Rebecca Dresser (2012). Building an Ethical Foundation for First-in-Human Nanotrials. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):802-808.
    Novel nanomedical interventions require human testing to evaluate their safety and effectiveness. To establish a proper evidentiary basis for human trials, nanomedical innovations must first be subjected to animal and other laboratory testing. But it is uncertain whether the traditional laboratory approaches to safety evaluation will supply adequate information on nanotechnology risks to humans. This uncertainty, together with other features of nanomedical innovation, heightens the ethical challenges in conducting FIH nanotrials.
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  22. Leili Fatehi, Susan M. Wolf, Jeffrey McCullough, Ralph Hall, Frances Lawrenz, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Cortney Jones, Stephen A. Campbell, Rebecca S. Dresser, Arthur G. Erdman, Christy L. Haynes, Robert A. Hoerr, Linda F. Hogle, Moira A. Keane, George Khushf, Nancy M. P. King, Efrosini Kokkoli, Gary Marchant, Andrew D. Maynard, Martin Philbert, Gurumurthy Ramachandran, Ronald A. Siegel & Samuel Wickline (2012). Recommendations for Nanomedicine Human Subjects Research Oversight: An Evolutionary Approach for an Emerging Field. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (4):716-750.
    The nanomedicine field is fast evolving toward complex, “active,” and interactive formulations. Like many emerging technologies, nanomedicine raises questions of how human subjects research (HSR) should be conducted and the adequacy of current oversight, as well as how to integrate concerns over occupational, bystander, and environmental exposures. The history of oversight for HSR investigating emerging technologies is a patchwork quilt without systematic justification of when ordinary oversight for HSR is enough versus when added oversight is warranted. Nanomedicine HSR provides an (...)
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  23. Rebecca Dresser (2011). Bioethics and Cancer: When the Professional Becomes Personal. Hastings Center Report 41 (6):14-18.
    In 2006, I was diagnosed with cancer. This began a crash course in real-world medical ethics. Having cancer was awful, but it was instructive, too. The experience gave me a new understanding of what my profession is about. Individuals in the bioethics field often address topics related to cancer, such as medical decision-making, the patient-physician relationship, clinical trials, and access to health care. Yet few engaged in this work have lived with cancer themselves. Experience as a cancer patient or family (...)
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  24. Rebecca Dresser (2011). Families and Forensic DNA Profiles. Hastings Center Report 41 (3):11-12.
    Law enforcement officials often turn to DNA identification methods to detect—and rule out—possible offenders. Every state operates its own database of convicted offenders' DNA profiles; some states store profiles of arrested people, too. The Federal Bureau of Investigation maintains a national database of profiles submitted by laboratories across the country.A few years ago, officials came up with a new way to use DNA profiles in forensic identification. Ordinary searches require an exact match between DNA found at a crime scene and (...)
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  25. Rebecca Dresser (2011). The Varieties of Consent. Hastings Center Report 41 (5):46-47.
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  26. Rebecca Dresser (2010). Brain Imaging and Courtroom Deception. Hastings Center Report 40 (6):7-8.
    Deception is an all-too-common human activity, one that succeeds because we cannot always detect it in others. It complicates all sorts of human decision-making, including attributing guilt for criminal offenses. The law relies on human fact-finders to determine whether criminal defendants claiming innocence, as well as witnesses testifying about a case, are telling the truth. But the fallibility of human lie detection has fueled the search for a more accurate replacement. Scientists have developed new approaches to lie detection that use (...)
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  27. Rebecca Dresser (2010). Suicide Attempts and Treatment Refusals. Hastings Center Report 40 (3):10-11.
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  28. Rebecca Dresser (2010). Stem Cell Research as Innovation: Expanding the Ethical and Policy Conversation. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):332-341.
    Research using human embryonic stem cells raises an array of complex ethical issues, including, but by no means limited to, the moral status of developing human life. Unfortunately much of the public discussion fails to take into account this complexity. Advocacy for liberal and conservative positions on human embryonic stem cell research can be simplistic and misleading. Ethical concepts such as truth-telling, scientific integrity, and social justice should be part of the debate over federal support for human embryonic stem cell (...)
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  29. Kristi L. Kirschner, Rebecca Brashler, Rebecca Dresser & Carol Levine (2010). Sexuality and a Severely Brain-Injured Spouse. Hastings Center Report 40 (3):14-16.
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  30. Rebecca Dresser (2009). First-in-Human Trial Participants: Not a Vulnerable Population, but Vulnerable Nonetheless. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (1):38-50.
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  31. Rebecca Dresser (2009). Irrational Basis: The Legal Status of Medical Marijuana. Hastings Center Report 39 (6):7-8.
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  32. Rebecca Dresser (2009). Prenatal Testing and Disability: A Truce in the Culture Wars? Hastings Center Report 39 (3):7-8.
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  33. Rebecca Dresser (2009). Substituting Authenticity for Autonomy. Hastings Center Report 39 (2):3-3.
  34. Rebecca Dresser & Joel Frader (2009). Off-Label Prescribing: A Call for Heightened Professional and Government Oversight. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 37 (3):476-486.
  35. Rebecca Dresser (2008). Human Dignity and the Seriously Ill Patient. In Adam Schulman (ed.), Human Dignity and Bioethics: Essays Commissioned by the President's Council on Bioethics. [President's Council on Bioethics.
     
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  36. Rebecca Dresser (2008). Neuroscience's Uncertain Threat to Criminal Law. Hastings Center Report 38 (6):9-10.
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  37. Rebecca Dresser (2008). The Limits of Apology Laws. Hastings Center Report 38 (3):pp. 6-7.
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  38. Rebecca Dresser (2008). The Role of Patient Advocates and Public Representatives in Research. In Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press. 231.
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  39. Haavi Morreim, Rebecca Dresser, David B. Resnik & Robert J. Wells (2008). The Sex Kitten of Bioethics?: Research Ethics Comes of Age. Hastings Center Report 38 (5):4-6.
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  40. Rebecca Dresser (2007). Protecting Women From Their Abortion Choices. Hastings Center Report 37 (6):13-14.
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  41. Rebecca Dresser (2007). The Curious Case of Off-Label Use. Hastings Center Report 37 (3):9-11.
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  42. Rebecca Dresser (2006). Dworkin on Dementia. In Stephen A. Green & Sidney Bloch (eds.), An Anthology of Psychiatric Ethics. Oxford University Press. 297--301.
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  43. Rebecca Dresser (2006). Investigational Drugs and the Constitution. Hastings Center Report 36 (6):9-10.
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  44. Rebecca Dresser (2006). Pharmaceutical Company Gifts: From Voluntary Standards to Legal Demands. Hastings Center Report 36 (3):8-9.
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  45. Rebecca Dresser (2006). Private-Sector Research Ethics: Marketing or Good Conflicts Management? The 2005 John J. Conley Lecture on Medical Ethics. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (2):115-139.
    Pharmaceutical companies are major sponsors of biomedical research. Most scholars and policymakers focus their attention on government and academic oversight activities, however. In this article, I consider the role of pharmaceutical companies’ internal ethics statements in guiding decisions about corporate research and development (R&D). I review materials from drug company websites and contributions from the business and medical ethics literature that address ethical responsibilities of businesses in general and pharmaceutical companies in particular. I discuss positive and negative uses of pharmaceutical (...)
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  46. Kathleen Cranley Glass, David B. Resnik, Stephen Olufemi Sodeke, Halley S. Faust, Rebecca Dresser, Nancy M. P. King, C. D. Herrera, David Orentlicher & Lynn A. Jansen (2006). Protection of Human Subjects and Scientific Progress: Can the Two Be Reconciled? Hastings Center Report 36 (1):4-9.
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  47. Rebecca Dresser (2005). A New Era in Drug Regulation? Hastings Center Report 35 (3):10-11.
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  48. Rebecca Dresser (2005). Professionals, Conformity, and Conscience. Hastings Center Report 35 (6):9-10.
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  49. Rebecca Dresser (2005). Schiavo's Legacy:. Hastings Center Report 35 (3):20-22.
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  50. Rebecca Dresser (2005). Stem Cell Research: The Bigger Picture. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 48 (2):181-194.
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