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  1. Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung (2009). Aquinas's Ethics: Metaphysical Foundations, Moral Theory, and Theological Context. University of Notre Dame Press.
    The purpose of __Aquinas's Ethics__ is to place Thomas Aquinas's moral theory in its full philosophical and theological context and to do so in a way that makes Aquinas readily accessible to students and interested general readers, including those encountering Aquinas for the first time. Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, Colleen McCluskey, and Christina Van Dyke begin by explaining Aquinas's theories of the human person and human action, since these ground his moral theory. In their interpretation, Aquinas's theological commitments crucially shape his (...)
     
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    Rebecca Konyndyk Deyoung (2014). Practicing Hope. Res Philosophica 91 (3):387-410.
    In this essay, I consider how the theological virtue of hope might be practiced. I will first explain Thomas Aquinas’s account of this virtue, including its structural relation to the passion of hope, its opposing vices, and its relationship to the friendship of charity. Then, using narrative and character analysis from the film The Shawshank Redemption, I examine a range of hopeful and proto-hopeful practices concerning both the goods one hopes for and the power one relies on to attain those (...)
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    Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung (2004). Aquinas's Virtues of Acknowledged Dependence: A New Measure of Greatness. Faith and Philosophy 21 (2):214-227.
    This paper compares Aristotle’s and Aquinas’s accounts of the virtue of magnanimity specifically as a corrective to the vice of pusillanimity. After definingpusillanimity and underscoring key features of Aristotelian magnanimity, I explain how Aquinas’s account of Christian magnanimity, by making humandependence on God fundamental to this virtue, not only clarifies the differences between the vice of pusillanimity and the virtue of humility, but also showswhy only Christian magnanimity can free us from improper and damaging forms of dependence on the opinions (...)
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    Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung (2015). The Roots of Despair. Res Philosophica 92 (4):829-854.
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    Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung (2007). Love of Self and Love of God in Thirteenth Century Ethics. Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (2):329-330.
    Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung - Love of Self and Love of God in Thirteenth Century Ethics - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:2 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.2 329-330 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung Calvin College Thomas M. Osborne, Jr. Love of Self and Love of God in Thirteenth Century Ethics. Notre Dame, IN: University of Notre Dame Press, 2005. Pp. ix + 325. Paper $30.00. Thomas Osborne's study is doubly successful—first, as (...)
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    Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung (2014). Sloth: Some Historical Reflections on Laziness, Effort, and Resistance to the Demands of Love. In Kevin Timpe & Craig Boyd (eds.), Virtues and Their Vices. Oxford University Press
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    Rebecca Konyndyk Deyoung (2012). The Psychology of Character and Virtue, Edited by Craig Steven Titus. Faith and Philosophy 29 (3):366-368.
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  8. Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung (2004). Resistance to the Demands of Love: Aquinas on the Vice of Acedia. The Thomist 68 (2):173-204.
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  9. Rebecca Konyndyk Deyoung (2000). Virtues in Action: Aquinas' Reply to the Action-Guiding Objection. Dissertation, University of Notre Dame
    For all the strengths the recent recovery of the virtues brings to moral philosophy, opponents of virtue-based theories claim that such theories cannot do the essential work of guiding action. This dissertation responds to that objection by drawing upon Thomas Aquinas's account of the four cardinal virtues in the secunda pars of the Summa Theologiae. I argue that Aquinas's moral theory has an emphasis on the virtues such that proper attention is given to the character of the agent, but at (...)
     
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