67 found
Order:
See also:
Profile: Rebecca Kukla (University of South Florida)
Profile: Rebecca Kukla (Georgetown University)
Profile: Rebecca Kukla
  1.  4
    Rebecca Kukla (2005). Mass Hysteria: Medicine, Culture, and Mothers' Bodies. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Mass Hysteria examines the medical and cultural practices surrounding pregnancy, new motherhood, and infant feeding. Late eighteenth century transformations in these practices reshaped mothers' bodies, and contemporary norms and routines of prenatal care and early motherhood have inherited the legacy of that era. As a result, mothers are socially positioned in ways that can make it difficult for them to establish and maintain healthy and safe boundaries and appropriate divisions between public and private space.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
  2.  27
    Rebecca Kukla (2012). “Author TBD”: Radical Collaboration in Contemporary Biomedical Research. Philosophy of Science 79 (5):845-858.
  3.  78
    Rebecca Kukla (2014). Performative Force, Convention, and Discursive Injustice. Hypatia 29 (2):440-457.
    I explore how gender can shape the pragmatics of speech. In some circumstances, when a woman deploys standard discursive conventions in order to produce a speech act with a specific performative force, her utterance can turn out, in virtue of its uptake, to have a quite different force—a less empowering force—than it would have if performed by a man. When members of a disadvantaged group face a systematic inability to produce a specific kind of speech act that they are entitled (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  4. Rebecca Kukla (2002). Rousseau's Republican Romance (Review). Hypatia 17 (2):174-183.
  5.  18
    Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Lisa M. Mitchell, Elizabeth Mitchell Armstrong, Lisa H. Harris, Rebecca Kukla, Miriam Kuppermann & Margaret Olivia Little (2009). Risk and the Pregnant Body. Hastings Center Report 39 (6):34-42.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  6.  8
    Rebecca Kukla (2016). Editorial Note. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 25 (4):vii-ix.
    This issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal continues two conversations that have been developing in this journal over the last few years, and introduces a new and timely one. Kevin Elliot and Paul Mushak’s paper, “Structured Development and Promotion of a Research Field: Hormesis in Biology, Toxicology, and Environmental Regulatory Science,” continues an ongoing debate in this journal over the role of values in shaping scientific methodology and communication, and how this role should be managed at the level (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  83
    Rebecca Kukla (2005). Conscientious Autonomy: Displacing Decisions in Health Care. Hastings Center Report 35 (2):34-44.
    : The standard bioethics account is that respecting patient autonomy means ensuring patients make their own decisions. In fact, respecting patient autonomy often has more to do with the overall shape and meaning of patients' health care regimes, and sometimes, at least, patients will very reasonably defer to medical authority.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  8.  4
    Rebecca Kukla (2015). Delimiting the Proper Scope of Epistemology. Philosophical Perspectives 29 (1):202-216.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Rebecca Kukla (2008). Naturalizing Objectivity. Perspectives on Science 16 (3):pp. 285-302.
    We can understand objectivity, in the broadest sense of the term, as epistemic accountability to the real. Since at least the 1986 publication of Sandra Harding’s The Science Question in Feminism, so-called standpoint epistemologists have sought to build an understanding of such objectivity that does not essentially anchor it to a dislocated, ‘view from nowhere’ stance on the part of the judging subject. Instead, these theorists have argued that a proper understanding of objectivity must recognize that different agential standpoints offer (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  10. Rebecca Kukla (2000). Myth, Memory and Misrecognition in Sellars' ``Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind''. Philosophical Studies 101 (2-3):161-211.
  11. Rebecca Kukla (2002). The Ontology and Temporality of Conscience. Continental Philosophy Review 35 (1):1-34.
    Philosophers have often posited a foundational calling voice, such that hearing its call constitutes subjects as responsive and responsible negotiators of normative claims. I give the name ldquo;transcendental conscience to that which speaks in this founding, constitutive voice. The role of transcendental conscience is not – or not merely – to normatively bind the subject, but to constitute the possibility of the subject's being bound by any particular, contentful normative claims in the first place. I explore the ontological and temporal (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  12. Mark Lance & Rebecca Kukla, Perception, Language, and the First Person.
    Pragmatism has enjoyed a major resurgence in Anglo-American philosophy over the course of the last decade or two, and Robert Brandom’s work – particularly his 1994 tome Making it Explicit (MIE) – has been at the vanguard of this resurgence (Brandom 1994).2 But pragmatism comes in several surprisingly distinct flavours. Authors such as Hubert Dreyfus find their roots in certain parts of Heidegger and in phenomenologists such as Merleau-Ponty, and they privilege embodied, preconceptual skills as opposed to discursive practices as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  12
    Rebecca Kukla (2014). Living with Pirates. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):75-85.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  14. Rebecca Kukla (2005). The Antinomies of Impure Reason: Rousseau and Kant on the Metaphysics of Truth-Telling. Inquiry 48 (3):203 – 231.
    Truth-telling is a project that is both gripping and problematic for Rousseau, as he is both captured by an ideal of telling as complete, undistorted discernment, documentation and communication, and also haunted by the fear that telling can never be this innocent. For Rousseau, as for Kant, telling does not leave the told untouched; rather, telling gives us a type of contact with objects that is marked and mediated by the process of telling itself, and hence the possibility of immediately (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15.  30
    Rebecca Kukla (2008). Measuring Mothering. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 1 (1):67 - 90.
    As a culture, we have a tendency to measure motherhood in terms of a set of signal moments that have become the focus of special social attention and anxiety; we interpret these as emblematic summations of women's mothering abilities. Women's performances during these moments can seem to exhaust the story of mothering, and mothers often internalize these measures and evaluate their own mothering in terms of them. "Good" mothers are those who pass a series of tests—they bond properly during their (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  16. Rebecca Kukla (2007). Resituating the Principle of Equipoise: Justice and Access to Care in Non-Ideal Conditions. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (3):171-202.
    : The principle of equipoise traditionally is grounded in the special obligations of physician-investigators to provide research participants with optimal care. This grounding makes the principle hard to apply in contexts with limited health resources, to research that is not directed by physicians, or to non-therapeutic research. I propose a different version of the principle of equipoise that does not depend upon an appeal to the Hippocratic duties of physicians and that is designed to be applicable within a wider range (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17.  35
    Rebecca Kukla & Laura Ruetsche (2002). Contingent Natures and Virtuous Knowers: Could Epistemology Be 'Gendered'? Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (3):389 - 418.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  18. Sarah Hardy & Rebecca Kukla (1999). A Paramount Narrative: Exploring Space on the Starship Enterprise. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):177-191.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Rebecca Kukla, Talking Back: Monstrosity, Mundanity, and Cynicism in Television Talk Shows.
    Fertile grounds for theoretical inquiry can be found in the oddest corners. Contemporary television programming provides viewers with several talk shows of the grotesque, as I will call them, in which the aim of each episode is to put some monstrous human phenomenon on display with the help of a host and a participating studio audience. In this paper I will try to support the unlikely claim that these talk shows, which include The Jerry Springer Show and Sally Jesse Raphael (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  25
    Rebecca Kukla, Miriam Kuppermann, Margaret Little, Anne Drapkin Lyerly, Lisa M. Mitchell, Elizabeth M. Armstrong & Lisa Harris (2009). Finding Autonomy in Birth. Bioethics 23 (1):1-8.
    Over the last several years, as cesarean deliveries have grown increasingly common, there has been a great deal of public and professional interest in the phenomenon of women 'choosing' to deliver by cesarean section in the absence of any specific medical indication. The issue has sparked intense conversation, as it raises questions about the nature of autonomy in birth. Whereas mainstream bioethical discourse is used to associating autonomy with having a large array of choices, this conception of autonomy does not (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  21.  40
    Rebecca Kukla (2006). Objectivity and Perspective in Empirical Knowledge. Episteme 3 (1-2):80-95.
    Epistemologists generally think that genuine warrant that is available to anyone must be available to everyone who is exposed to the relevant causal inputs and is able and willing to properly exercise her rationality. The motivating idea behind this requirement is roughly that an objective view is one that is not bound to a particular perspective. In this paper I ask whether the aperspectivality of our warrants is a precondition for securing the objectivity of our claims. I draw upon a (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  22.  40
    Rebecca Kukla (2006). Ethics and Ideology in Breastfeeding Advocacy Campaigns. Hypatia 21 (1):157-181.
    : Mothers serve as an important layer of the health-care system, with special responsibilities to care for the health of families and nations. In our social discourse, we tend to treat maternal "choices" as though they were morally and causally self-contained units of influence with primary control over children's health. In this essay, I use infant feeding as a lens for examining the ethical contours of mothers' caretaking practices and responsibilities, as they are situated within cultural meanings and institutional pressures. (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23.  42
    Rebecca Kukla (2007). Holding the Body of Another. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 11 (2):397-408.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  37
    Mark Lance & Rebecca Kukla (2013). Leave the Gun; Take the Cannoli! The Pragmatic Topography of Second-Person Calls. Ethics 123 (3):456-478.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  30
    Eric Winsberg, Bryce Huebner & Rebecca Kukla (2014). Accountability and Values in Radically Collaborative Research. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 46:16-23.
    This paper discusses a crisis of accountability that arises when scientific collaborations are massively epistemically distributed. We argue that social models of epistemic collaboration, which are social analogs to what Patrick Suppes called a “model of the experiment,” must play a role in creating accountability in these contexts. We also argue that these social models must accommodate the fact that the various agents in a collaborative project often have ineliminable, messy, and conflicting interests and values; any story about accountability in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  88
    Rebecca Kukla (2010). Analytic Philosophy and the Return of Hegelian Thought (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (1):pp. 113-115.
    In this book, Paul Redding argues both that Hegel’s thought is making a resurgence in some quarters of analytic philosophy, and that such a resurgence is well-deserved and will bear future fruit. He begins with Bertrand Russell’s story of analytic philosophy as born out of a rejection of Hegelian thought, and traces the development of an alternative path through analytic philosophy that moves through Frege, Wittgenstein, Sellars, and Evans, and finds its fullest contemporary form in Brandom and McDowell. This alternative (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  67
    Greg Restall, Rebecca Kukla & Mark Lance, Appendix to Rebecca Kukla and Mark Lance 'Yo!' And 'Lo!': The Pragmatic Topography of the Space of Reasons.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  68
    Rebecca Kukla (1992). Cognitive Models and Representation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (2):219-32.
    Several accounts of representation in cognitive systems have recently been proposed. These look for a theory that will establish how a representation comes to have a certain content, and how these representations are used by cognitive systems. Covariation accounts are unsatisfactory, as they make intelligent reasoning and cognition impossible. Cummins' interpretation-based account cannot explain the distinction between cognitive and non-cognitive systems, nor how certain cognitive representations appear to have intrinsic meaning. Cognitive systems can be defined as model-constructers, or systems that (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  19
    Rebecca Kukla & Mark Lance (2014). Intersubjectivity and Receptive Experience. Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (1):22-42.
    Wilfrid Sellars's iconic exposé of the ‘myth of the given’ taught us that experience must present the world to us as normatively laden, in the sense that the contents of experience must license inferences, rule out and justify various beliefs, and rationalize actions. Somehow our beliefs must be governed by the objects as they present themselves to us. Often this requirement is cashed out using language that attributes agent-like properties to objects: we are described as ‘accountable to’ objects, while objects (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  2
    Rebecca Kukla (2006). Ethics and Ideology in Breastfeeding Advocacy Campaigns. Hypatia 21 (1):157-180.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  49
    Rebecca Kukla (2007). How Do Patients Know? Hastings Center Report 37 (5):27-35.
    : The way patients make health care decisions is much more complicated than is often recognized. Patient autonomy allows both that patients will sometimes defer to clinicians and that they should sometimes be active inquirers, ready to question their clinicians and do some independent research. At the same time, patients' active inquiry requires clinicians' support.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Rebecca Kukla (1996). The Coupling of Human Souls: Rousseau and the Problem of Gender Relations. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 46:57-92.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  33.  2
    Rebecca Kukla (2015). Editorial Note. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 25 (3):vii-ix.
    This season’s issue includes two articles on a quickly expanding topic in bioethics: the ethics of enhancement. There are many kinds of enhancement both actual and imagined: we can enhance people’s physical, aesthetic, cognitive, or moral capacities, for instance; individuals might choose particular enhancements, parents might choose them for their future children, or states might institute them at the widespread population level; the enhancements might be technologically complex or take the form of low-tech education and training; they might be permanent (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  2
    Rebecca Kukla & McKay Holland (2015). Editorial Note. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 25 (2).
    The summer issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal highlights a range of controversial issues that will incite spirited disagreement amongst our readers. These five papers each take up complex contemporary ethical challenges and develop creative strategies to resolve them. Together they represent our continued commitment to publishing theoretically rigorous, empirically informed, and practically relevant work in bioethics.In “HPV and the Ethics of CDC’s Vaccination Requirements for Immigrants,” Mark Navin offers a timely defense of immunization mandates for migrants, extending (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Rebecca Kukla (2000). How to Get an Interpretivist Committed. Protosociology 14:180-221.
  36.  11
    Rebecca Kukla (2013). Editorial Note. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 23 (4).
    It gives me great pleasure to introduce the December 2013 issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal—our ninety-second!—and to introduce myself as the new Editor-in-Chief of the journal. For almost a quarter of a century, from its special vantage point in Washington, D.C., and at Georgetown University’s Joseph and Rose Kennedy Institute of Ethics, the KIEJ has served as a leading source for practically engaged, policy-relevant philosophical work in bioethics, broadly construed. Under the expert stewardship of Robert Veatch and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  37
    Rebecca Kukla (2006). Introduction: Maternal Bodies. Hypatia 21 (1):vii-ix.
  38.  4
    Sarah Hardy & Rebecca Kukla (2015). Making Sense of Miscarriage Online. Journal of Social Philosophy 46 (1):106-125.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  9
    Rebecca Kukla & Harry R. Moody (forthcoming). The Ethical Force Program is a Multi. Hastings Center Report.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  24
    Rebecca Kukla (2009). Communicating Consent. Hastings Center Report 39 (3):45-47.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  3
    Rebecca Kukla (2009). The Phrenological Impulse and the Morphology of Character. In Sue Campbell, Letitia Meynell & Susan Sherwin (eds.), Embodiment and Agency. Pennsylvania State University Press 76--99.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  6
    Rebecca Kukla (forthcoming). Virginia A. Sharpe Teaches Environ. Hastings Center Report.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  3
    Rebecca Kukla (2004). Joseph Rouse: How Scientific Practices Matter: Reclaiming Philosophical Naturalism. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 71 (2):216-219.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  1
    Rebecca Kukla (2014). Studying Human Behavior: How Scientists Investigate Aggression and Sexuality by Helen Longino. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (1):E-97-E-103.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  17
    Rebecca Kukla (2006). Review of Slavoj Iek, Rex Butler (Ed.), Scott Stephens (Ed.), Interrogating the Real. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (4).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  2
    Rebecca Kukla (2007). The Dream of the Perfect Child (Review). Hypatia 22 (4):199-203.
  47.  7
    Rebecca Kukla (2002). Attention and Blindness. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 32 (Supplement):319-346.
  48.  9
    Rebecca Kukla (1996). Decentering women. Metaphilosophy 27 (1-2):28-52.
    Translate
      Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  7
    Rebecca Kukla (2002). Book Review: Elizabeth Rose Wingrove. Rousseau's Republican Romance. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 17 (2):174-183.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  8
    Rebecca Kukla (2007). The Dream of the Perfect Child by Joan Rothschild. Hypatia 22 (4):199-203.
1 — 50 / 67