Search results for 'Recovery (Disorders)' (try it on Scholar)

23 found
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  1.  52
    Pengmin Qin, Georg Northoff, Timothy Lane & et al (2015). GABAA Receptor Deficits Predict Recovery in Patients With Disorders of Consciousness: A Preliminary Multimodal [11C]Flumazenil PET and fMRI Study. Human Brain Mapping:DOI: 10.1002/hbm.22883.
    Disorders of consciousness (DoC)—that is, unresponsive wakefulness syndrome/vegetative state and minimally conscious state—are debilitating conditions for which no reliable markers of consciousness recovery have yet been identified. Evidence points to the GABAergic system being altered in DoC, making it a potential target as such a marker.
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  2.  10
    Philippe Huguelet (2014). The Contribution of Existential Phenomenology in the Recovery-Oriented Care of Patients with Severe Mental Disorders. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (4):346-367.
    Promoting recovery has become more and more important in the care of patients with severe mental disorders such as psychosis. Recovery is a personal process of growth involving hope, self-identity, meaning in life, and responsibility. Obviously, these components pertain, at least in part, to a psychotherapeutic care perspective. Yet, up to now, recovery has mainly been taken into account in transforming health services and as a general framework for supportive therapy. Existential phenomenology abdicates a theoretical stance and (...)
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  3.  38
    Joseph J. Fins, Nicholas D. Schiff & Kathleen M. Foley (2007). Late Recovery From the Minimally Conscious State: Ethical and Policy Implications. Neurology 68 (4):304-307.
  4.  40
    Tristan Bekinschtein, Cecilia Tiberti, Jorge Niklison, Mercedes Tamashiro, Melania Ron, Silvina Carpintiero, Mirta Villarreal, Cecilia Forcato, Ramon Leiguarda & Facundo Manes (2005). Assessing Level of Consciousness and Cognitive Changes From Vegetative State to Full Recovery. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):307-322.
  5.  3
    Donald G. Stein & Marylou M. Glasier (1995). Some Practical and Theoretical Issues Concerning Fetal Brain Tissue Grafts as Therapy for Brain Dysfunctions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):36-45.
    Grafts of embryonic neural tissue into the brains of adult patients are currently being used to treat Parkinson's disease and are under serious consideration as therapy for a variety of other degenerative and traumatic disorders. This target article evaluates the use of transplants to promote recovery from brain injury and highlights the kinds of questions and problems that must be addressed before this form of therapy is routinely applied. It has been argued that neural transplantation can promote functional (...) through the replacement of damaged nerve cells, the reestablishment of specific nerve pathways lost as a result of injury, the release of specific neurotransmitters, or the production of factors that promote neuronal growth. The latter two mechanisms, which need not rely on anatomical connections to the host brain, are open to examination for nonsurgical, less intrusive therapeutic use. Certain subjective judgments used to select patients who will receive grafts and in assessment of the outcome of graft therapy make it difficult to evaluate the procedure. In addition, little long-term assessment of transplant efficacy and effect has been done in nonhuman primates. Carefully controlled human studies, with multiple testing paradigms, are also needed to establish the efficacy of transplant therapy. (shrink)
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  6.  26
    J. Allan Hobson (2002). Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First-Person Account. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):377-390.
    Consciousness can be studied only if subjective experience is documented and quantified, yet first-person accounts of the effects of brain injury on conscious experience are as rare as they are potentially useful. This report documents the alterations in waking, sleeping, and dreaming caused by a lateral medullary infarct. Total insomnia and the initial suppression of dreaming was followed by the gradual recovery of both functions. A visual hallucinosis during waking that was associated with the initial period of sleep and (...)
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  7. Joseph T. Giacino & J. T. Whyte (2005). The Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States: Current Knowledge and Remaining Questions. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilation 20 (1):30-50.
  8.  10
    Mark W. Mahowald (2004). Commentary on Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First Person Account by J. Allan Hobson. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):134-137.
  9.  1
    Douglas F. Watt (2002). Commentary on Professor Hobson's First-Person Account of a Lateral Medullary Stroke (CVA): Affirmative Action for the Brainstem in Consciousness Studies? Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):391-395.
  10.  40
    Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy (2008). Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):3 – 12.
    The application of neuroimaging technology to the study of the injured brain has transformed how neuroscientists understand disorders of consciousness, such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states, and deepened our understanding of mechanisms of recovery. This scientific progress, and its potential clinical translation, provides an opportunity for ethical reflection. It was against this scientific backdrop that we convened a conference of leading investigators in neuroimaging, disorders of consciousness and neuroethics. Our goal was to develop an ethical (...)
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  11. Serife Tekin (2011). Self-Concept Through the Diagnostic Looking Glass: Narratives and Mental Disorder. Philosophical Psychology 24 (3):357-380.
    This paper explores how the diagnosis of mental disorder may affect the diagnosed subject’s self-concept by supplying an account that emphasizes the influence of autobiographical and social narratives on self-understanding. It focuses primarily on the diagnoses made according to the criteria provided by the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), and suggests that the DSM diagnosis may function as a source of narrative that affects the subject’s self-concept. Engaging in this analysis by appealing to autobiographies and memoirs written by (...)
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  12. K. W. M. Fulford (2006). Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.
    Mental health research and care in the twenty first century faces a series of conceptual and ethical challenges arising from unprecedented advances in the neurosciences, combined with radical cultural and organisational change. The Oxford Textbook of Philosophy of Psychiatry is aimed at all those responding to these challenges, from professionals in health and social care, managers, lawyers and policy makers; service users, informal carers and others in the voluntary sector; through to philosophers, neuroscientists and clinical researchers. Organised around (...)
     
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  13.  44
    Robert J. Ursano, Carol S. Fullerton & Artin Terhakopian (2008). Disasters and Health: Distress, Disorders, and Disaster Behaviors in Communities, Neighborhoods, and Nations. Social Research: An International Quarterly 75 (3):1015-1028.
    Disasters overwhelm resources and threaten the safety and functioning of communities. Mental health and community needs after catastrophic disasters can be substantial, however the effects of traumatic events are not exclusively bad with many people showing individual resilience and some reporting growth. Sustaining the social fabric of the community and facilitating recovery following disaster depends on leadership=s knowledge of a community=s resilience and vulnerabilities as well as an understanding of the distress, disorder, and health risk behavioral responses. A coordinated (...)
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  14. Ted L. Rothstein (2004). Recovery From Near Death Following Cerebral Anoxia. In C. Machado & D. E. Shewmon (eds.), Brain Death and Disorders of Consciousness. Plenum 189--196.
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  15.  20
    Joseph J. Fins & Alexandra Suppes (2011). Brain Injury and the Culture of Neglect: Musings on an Uncertain Future. Social Research: An International Quarterly 78 (3):731-746.
    Our essay will address both the right-to-die movement in America and the emerging culture of neglect in the treatment of a class of patients with disorders of consciousness with which the right-to-die movement is entwined. We trace the etiology of these two themes through changes in our scientific understanding of brain injury and recovery against a growing societal acculturation to dominion over one's self at life's end.
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  16.  33
    Joseph J. Fins (2008). Neuroethics and Neuroimaging: Moving Toward Transparency. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):46 – 52.
    Without exaggeration, it could be said that we are entering a golden age of neuroscience. Informed by recent developments in neuroimaging that allow us to peer into the working brain at both a structural and functional level, neuroscientists are beginning to untangle mechanisms of recovery after brain injury and grapple with age-old questions about brain and mind and their correlates neural mechanisms and consciousness. Neuroimaging, coupled with new diagnostic categories and assessment scales are helping us develop a (...)
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  17.  6
    Rachael Mulheron (2012). Rewriting the Requirement for a 'Recognized Psychiatric Injury' in Negligence Claims. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 32 (1):77-112.
    The rules governing recovery for negligently inflicted psychiatric injury are among the most criticized of all of tort law. However, one area which, to date, has escaped with a minimum of judicial or academic scrutiny concerns the very threshold requirement for these actions: proof of a ‘recognized psychiatric illness’. This article critiques that longstanding requirement of English law from two perspectives. First, it is argued that the international classifications of psychiatric disorders (ICD-10 and DSM-IV) are being misapplied and misconstrued (...)
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  18.  17
    Quentin Noirhomme & Caroline Schnakers, A Twitch of Consciousness: Defining the Boundaries of Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States.
    Some patients awaken from their coma but only show reflex motor activity. This condition of wakeful (eyes open) unawareness is called the vegetative state. In 2002, a new clinical entity coined ‘‘minimally conscious state’’ defined patients who show more than reflex responsiveness but remain unable to communicate their thoughts and feelings. Emergence from the minimally conscious state is defined by functional recovery of verbal or nonverbal communication.1 Our empirical medical definitions aim to propose clearcut borders separating disorders of consciousness (...)
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  19.  9
    M. Zimmermann (2012). Narrating Stroke: The Life-Writing and Fiction of Brain Damage. Medical Humanities 38 (2):73-77.
    Cerebro-vascular events are, after neurodegenerative disorders, the most frequent cause of brain damage that leads to the patient's impaired cognitive and/or bodily functioning. While the medico-scientific discourse related to stroke suggests that patients experience a change in identity and self-concept, the present analysis focuses on the patients' personal presentation of their experience to, first, highlight their way of thinking and feeling and, second, contribute to the clinician's actual understanding of the meaning of stroke within the life of each individual. As (...)
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  20.  2
    Christian Perring (2006). Conceptualiser les troubles mentaux chez les enfants et les adolescents. Philosophiques 33 (1):65-79.
    J’explore de façon critique la supposition du DSM[1] et de théoriciens tels que Wakefield et Gert selon laquelle les troubles mentaux doivent être attribués à un individu plutôt qu’à un groupe de personnes. Cette supposition est particulièrement problématique en pédopsychiatrie où le système familial est très souvent au centre de l’attention clinique. Il y a bien sûr des éléments de preuve substantiels indiquant que certains troubles mentaux des individus sont causés par leurs relations avec les autres et que leur guérison (...)
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  21.  19
    Patrick Bracken (2005). Postpsychiatry. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction : the times they are a changin' -- Doing their best -- Values, evidence, conflict -- What counts as evidence? -- The miracle drug -- The battle for acceptance : defining the relationship between medicine and the world of madness and distress -- The ring -- Foregrounding contexts : what kinds of understanding are appropriate in the world of mental illness? -- Losing Peter -- Mind, language, and meaning -- Beetles -- Ethics before technology : is 'treatment' the best (...)
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  22.  73
    Philip J. Barker (2005). The Tidal Model: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals. Brunner-Routledge.
    The Tidal Model represents a significant alternative to mainstream mental health theories, emphasizing how those suffering from mental health problems can benefit from taking a more active role in their own treatment. Based on extensive research, The Tidal Model charts the development of this approach, outlining the theoretical basis of the model to illustrate the benefits of a holistic model of care which promotes self-management and recovery. Clinical examples are also employed to show how, by exploring rather (...)
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  23.  4
    Thomas J. Schoeneman, Janel Putnam, Ian Rasmussen, Nina Sparr & Stephanie Beechem (2012). “A Fire in the Blood”: Metaphors of Bipolar Disorder in Jamison's An Unquiet Mind. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (3):185-205.
    Content analysis of three chapters of Jamison’s memoir, An Unquiet Mind, shows that depression, mania, and Bipolar Disorder have a common metaphoric core as a sequential process of suffering and adversity that is a form of malevolence and destruction. Depression was down and in, while mania was up, in and distant, circular and zigzag, a powerful force of quickness and motion, fieriness, strangeness, seduction, expansive extravagance, and acuity. Bipolar Disorder is down and away and a sequential and cyclical process that (...)
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