Search results for 'Recovery (Disorders)' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Leon Y. Deouell Mario Bonato (2013). Hemispatial Neglect: Computer-Based Testing Allows More Sensitive Quantification of Attentional Disorders and Recovery and Might Lead to Better Evaluation of Rehabilitation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 48.0
    Hemispatial Neglect: Computer-Based Testing Allows More Sensitive Quantification of Attentional Disorders and Recovery and Might Lead to Better Evaluation of Rehabilitation.
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  2. Joseph J. Fins, Nicholas D. Schiff & Kathleen M. Foley (2007). Late Recovery From the Minimally Conscious State: Ethical and Policy Implications. Neurology 68 (4):304-307.score: 39.0
  3. Tristan Bekinschtein, Cecilia Tiberti, Jorge Niklison, Mercedes Tamashiro, Melania Ron, Silvina Carpintiero, Mirta Villarreal, Cecilia Forcato, Ramon Leiguarda & Facundo Manes (2005). Assessing Level of Consciousness and Cognitive Changes From Vegetative State to Full Recovery. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation. Vol 15 (3-4):307-322.score: 39.0
  4. Donald G. Stein & Marylou M. Glasier (1995). Some Practical and Theoretical Issues Concerning Fetal Brain Tissue Grafts as Therapy for Brain Dysfunctions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):36-45.score: 36.0
    Grafts of embryonic neural tissue into the brains of adult patients are currently being used to treat Parkinson's disease and are under serious consideration as therapy for a variety of other degenerative and traumatic disorders. This target article evaluates the use of transplants to promote recovery from brain injury and highlights the kinds of questions and problems that must be addressed before this form of therapy is routinely applied. It has been argued that neural transplantation can promote functional (...) through the replacement of damaged nerve cells, the reestablishment of specific nerve pathways lost as a result of injury, the release of specific neurotransmitters, or the production of factors that promote neuronal growth. The latter two mechanisms, which need not rely on anatomical connections to the host brain, are open to examination for nonsurgical, less intrusive therapeutic use. Certain subjective judgments used to select patients who will receive grafts and in assessment of the outcome of graft therapy make it difficult to evaluate the procedure. In addition, little long-term assessment of transplant efficacy and effect has been done in nonhuman primates. Carefully controlled human studies, with multiple testing paradigms, are also needed to establish the efficacy of transplant therapy. (shrink)
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  5. Joseph T. Giacino & J. T. Whyte (2005). The Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States: Current Knowledge and Remaining Questions. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilation 20 (1):30-50.score: 30.0
  6. J. Allan Hobson (2002). Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First-Person Account. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):377-390.score: 30.0
  7. Mark W. Mahowald (2004). Commentary on Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First Person Account by J. Allan Hobson. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):134-137.score: 30.0
  8. Douglas F. Watt (2002). Commentary on Professor Hobson's First-Person Account of a Lateral Medullary Stroke (CVA): Affirmative Action for the Brainstem in Consciousness Studies? Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):391-395.score: 30.0
  9. A. Demertzi, C. Schnakers, A. Soddu, M. A. Bruno, O. Gosseries, A. Vanhaudenhuyse & S. Laureys (2009). Neural Plasticity Lessons From Disorders of Consciousness. Frontiers in Psychology 1:245-245.score: 27.0
    Communication and intentional behavior are supported by the brain’s integrity at a structural and a functional level. When widespread loss of cerebral connectivity is brought about as a result of a severe brain injury, in many cases patients are not capable of conscious interactive behavior and are said to suffer from disorders of consciousness (e.g., coma, vegetative state /unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, minimally conscious states). This lesion paradigm has offered not only clinical insights, as how to improve diagnosis, prognosis and treatment, (...)
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  10. Serife Tekin (2011). Self-Concept Through the Diagnostic Looking Glass: Narratives and Mental Disorder. Philosophical Psychology 24 (3):357-380.score: 21.0
    This paper explores how the diagnosis of mental disorder may affect the diagnosed subject’s self-concept by supplying an account that emphasizes the influence of autobiographical and social narratives on self-understanding. It focuses primarily on the diagnoses made according to the criteria provided by the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), and suggests that the DSM diagnosis may function as a source of narrative that affects the subject’s self-concept. Engaging in this analysis by appealing to autobiographies and memoirs written by (...)
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  11. Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy (2008). Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):3 – 12.score: 21.0
    The application of neuroimaging technology to the study of the injured brain has transformed how neuroscientists understand disorders of consciousness, such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states, and deepened our understanding of mechanisms of recovery. This scientific progress, and its potential clinical translation, provides an opportunity for ethical reflection. It was against this scientific backdrop that we convened a conference of leading investigators in neuroimaging, disorders of consciousness and neuroethics. Our goal was to develop an ethical frame to (...)
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  12. Monica Risetti, Rita Formisano, Jlenia Toppi, Lucia Rita Quitadamo, Luigi Bianchi, Laura Astolfi, Febo Cincotti & Donatella Mattia (2013). On ERPs Detection in Disorders of Consciousness Rehabilitation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
    Disorders of Consciousness (DOC) like Vegetative State (VS) and Minimally Conscious State (MCS) are clinical conditions characterized by the absence or intermittent behavioural responsiveness. A neurophysiological monitoring of parameters like Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) could be a first step to follow-up the clinical evolution of these patients during their rehabilitation phase. Eleven patients diagnosed as VS (n= 8) and MCS (n= 3) by means of the JFK Coma Recovery Scale Revised (CRS-R) underwent scalp EEG recordings during the delivery of a (...)
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  13. Stephan A. Brandt Sein Schmidt, Michael Scholz, Klaus Obermayer (2013). Patterned Brain Stimulation, What a Framework with Rhythmic and Noisy Components Might Tell Us About Recovery Maximization. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
    Brain stimulation is having remarkable impact on clinical neurology. Brain stimulation can modulate neuronal activity in functionally segregated circumscribed regions of the human brain. Polarity-, frequency and noise specific stimulation can induce specific manipulations on neural activity.. In contrast to neocortical stimulation, deep-brain stimulation has become a tool that can dramatically improve the impact clinicians can possibly have on movement disorders. In contrast, neocortical brain stimulation is proving to be remarkably susceptible to intrinsic brain-states. Although evidence is accumulating that brain (...)
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  14. K. W. M. Fulford (2006). Oxford Textbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Mental health research and care in the twenty first century faces a series of conceptual and ethical challenges arising from unprecedented advances in the neurosciences, combined with radical cultural and organisational change. The Oxford Textbook of Philosophy of Psychiatry is aimed at all those responding to these challenges, from professionals in health and social care, managers, lawyers and policy makers; service users, informal carers and others in the voluntary sector; through to philosophers, neuroscientists and clinical researchers. Organised around a series (...)
     
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  15. Thomas J. Schoeneman, Janel Putnam, Ian Rasmussen, Nina Sparr & Stephanie Beechem (2012). “A Fire in the Blood”: Metaphors of Bipolar Disorder in Jamison's An Unquiet Mind. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (3):185-205.score: 18.0
    Content analysis of three chapters of Jamison’s memoir, An Unquiet Mind, shows that depression, mania, and Bipolar Disorder have a common metaphoric core as a sequential process of suffering and adversity that is a form of malevolence and destruction. Depression was down and in, while mania was up, in and distant, circular and zigzag, a powerful force of quickness and motion, fieriness, strangeness, seduction, expansive extravagance, and acuity. Bipolar Disorder is down and away and a sequential and cyclical process that (...)
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  16. Rachel Cooper (2012). Being Ill and Getting Better: Recovery and Accounts of Disorder. In Abraham Rudnick (ed.), Recovery of People with Mental Illness: Philosophical and Related Perspectives. Oup Oxford. 217.score: 13.0
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  17. Joseph J. Fins (2008). Neuroethics and Neuroimaging: Moving Toward Transparency. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):46 – 52.score: 12.0
    Without exaggeration, it could be said that we are entering a golden age of neuroscience. Informed by recent developments in neuroimaging that allow us to peer into the working brain at both a structural and functional level, neuroscientists are beginning to untangle mechanisms of recovery after brain injury and grapple with age-old questions about brain and mind and their correlates neural mechanisms and consciousness. Neuroimaging, coupled with new diagnostic categories and assessment scales are helping us develop a new diagnostic (...)
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  18. Quentin Noirhomme & Caroline Schnakers, A Twitch of Consciousness: Defining the Boundaries of Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States.score: 12.0
    Some patients awaken from their coma but only show reflex motor activity. This condition of wakeful (eyes open) unawareness is called the vegetative state. In 2002, a new clinical entity coined ‘‘minimally conscious state’’ defined patients who show more than reflex responsiveness but remain unable to communicate their thoughts and feelings. Emergence from the minimally conscious state is defined by functional recovery of verbal or nonverbal communication.1 Our empirical medical definitions aim to propose clearcut borders separating disorders of consciousness (...)
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  19. M. Zimmermann (2012). Narrating Stroke: The Life-Writing and Fiction of Brain Damage. Medical Humanities 38 (2):73-77.score: 12.0
    Cerebro-vascular events are, after neurodegenerative disorders, the most frequent cause of brain damage that leads to the patient's impaired cognitive and/or bodily functioning. While the medico-scientific discourse related to stroke suggests that patients experience a change in identity and self-concept, the present analysis focuses on the patients' personal presentation of their experience to, first, highlight their way of thinking and feeling and, second, contribute to the clinician's actual understanding of the meaning of stroke within the life of each individual. As (...)
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  20. J. A. Hamm, B. L. Leonhardt, R. L. Fogley & P. H. Lysaker (forthcoming). Literature as an Exploration of the Phenomenology of Schizophrenia: Disorder and Recovery in Denis Johnson's Jesus' Son. Medical Humanities.score: 12.0
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  21. Rachael Mulheron (2012). Rewriting the Requirement for a 'Recognized Psychiatric Injury' in Negligence Claims. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 32 (1):77-112.score: 12.0
    The rules governing recovery for negligently inflicted psychiatric injury are among the most criticized of all of tort law. However, one area which, to date, has escaped with a minimum of judicial or academic scrutiny concerns the very threshold requirement for these actions: proof of a ‘recognized psychiatric illness’. This article critiques that longstanding requirement of English law from two perspectives. First, it is argued that the international classifications of psychiatric disorders (ICD-10 and DSM-IV) are being misapplied and misconstrued (...)
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  22. Ted L. Rothstein (2004). Recovery From Near Death Following Cerebral Anoxia. In. In C. Machado & D. E. Shewmon (eds.), Brain Death and Disorders of Consciousness. Plenum. 189--196.score: 12.0
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  23. Philip J. Barker (2005). The Tidal Model: A Guide for Mental Health Professionals. Brunner-Routledge.score: 9.0
    The Tidal Model represents a significant alternative to mainstream mental health theories, emphasizing how those suffering from mental health problems can benefit from taking a more active role in their own treatment. Based on extensive research, The Tidal Model charts the development of this approach, outlining the theoretical basis of the model to illustrate the benefits of a holistic model of care which promotes self-management and recovery. Clinical examples are also employed to show how, by exploring rather than ignoring (...)
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  24. Patrick Bracken (2005). Postpsychiatry. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
    Introduction : the times they are a changin' -- Doing their best -- Values, evidence, conflict -- What counts as evidence? -- The miracle drug -- The battle for acceptance : defining the relationship between medicine and the world of madness and distress -- The ring -- Foregrounding contexts : what kinds of understanding are appropriate in the world of mental illness? -- Losing Peter -- Mind, language, and meaning -- Beetles -- Ethics before technology : is 'treatment' the best (...)
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  25. O. Olugbile & M. P. Zachariah (2011). The Relationship Between Creativity and Mental Disorder in an African Setting. Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):225.score: 9.0
    Background: There has for some time now been recognition that there was a relationship between exceptional creative talent and mental disorder. The works of Andreasen (2008) and others in this area have been very significant. However, most of the research has been carried out in USA and Europe. Very little has come out of Africa on the subject. Aim : To survey the beliefs of different groups within an African society, concerning the possibility of a relationship between creative talent and (...)
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  26. Danielle Soares Bio, Érika Leonardo de Souza & Ricardo Alberto Moreno (2011). Remissão Sintomática E Qualidade de Vida Em Pacientes Com Depressão Maior Tratados Com Antidepressivo: Um Estudo Prospectivo. Aletheia 34:151-162.score: 8.0
    Este estudo teve como objetivo estimar a Qualidade de Vida (QV) em pacientes com transtorno depressivo maior antes e após tratamento antidepressivo eficaz. Participaram do estudo 26 indivíduos (18 a 65 anos) com episódio agudo de Transtorno Depressivo Maior, segundo critérios do DSM-IV. A duração do..
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  27. Ejgil Jespersen, Anika A. Jordbru & Egil Martinsen (2008). Conversion Gait Disorder—Meeting Patients in Behaviour, Reuniting Body and Mind. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (2):185-199.score: 7.0
    The Hospital for Rehabilitation, Stavern, in Norway has treated patients with physical symptoms with no organic cause, so called conversion disorder patients, for over a decade. For four years research on the treatment has been carried out. Patients with conversion disorder seem not to fit in traditional somatic hospitals because their patienthood depends upon psychiatric diagnosis. Ironically, they appear not to belong in psychiatric hospitals because of their physical symptoms. The treatment offered these patients at hospitals for rehabilitation is adapted (...)
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  28. Mary Jeanne Larrabee (1995). The Time of Trauma: Husserl's Phenomenology and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. [REVIEW] Human Studies 18 (4):351 - 366.score: 7.0
    The phenomenology of inner temporalizing developed by Edmund Husserl provides a helpful framework for understanding a type of experiencing that can be part of the Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). My paper extrapolates hints from Husserl's work in order to describe those memories — flashbacks — that come so strongly to consciousness as to overtake the experiencer. Husserl's work offers several clues: his view of inner temporalization by which conscious experiences flow in both a serial and a nonserial manner; a characterization (...)
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  29. Piers Benn (2007). Disease, Addiction and the Freedom to Resist. Philosophical Papers 36 (3):465-481.score: 4.0
    ‘Twelve Step' recovery programmes such as Alcoholics Anonymous teach that an alcoholic, or other addict, has a disease, and needs to accept that she is ‘powerless' over her addiction before recovery can begin. However, the disease model of addiction has been criticised on the grounds that some addicts recover without external intervention. This critique is questionable, not because such recovery does not occur, but because many genuine diseases are self-limiting. However, the disease model is better criticised on (...)
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  30. Elisa A. Hurley (2010). Combat Trauma and the Moral Risks of Memory Manipulating Drugs. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (3):221-245.score: 4.0
    To date, 1.7 million US military service personnel have been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Of those, one in five are suffering from diagnosable combat-stress related psychological injuries including Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). All indications are that the mental health toll of the current conflicts on US troops and the medical systems that care for them will only increase. Against this backdrop, research suggesting that the common class of drugs known as beta-blockers might prevent the onset of PTSD is drawing (...)
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  31. Jennifer Radden (2012). Recognition Rights, Mental Health Consumers and Reconstructive Cultural Semantics. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 7 (1):1-8.score: 4.0
    IntroductionThose in mental health-related consumer movements have made clear their demands for humane treatment and basic civil rights, an end to stigma and discrimination, and a chance to participate in their own recovery. But theorizing about the politics of recognition, 'recognition rights' and epistemic justice, suggests that they also have a stake in the broad cultural meanings associated with conceptions of mental health and illness.ResultsFirst person accounts of psychiatric diagnosis and mental health care (shown here to represent 'counter stories' (...)
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  32. Fred Ribkoff & Paul Tyndall (2011). On the Dialectics of Trauma in Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire. Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):325-337.score: 4.0
    Blanche DuBois, the tragic heroine of Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire , has always been read as either “mad” from the start of the play or as a character who descends into “madness.” We argue that Streetcar adumbrates elements of trauma theory, specifically symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder such as involuntary reliving of traumatic events, dissociation, guilt, shame, denial, the shattering of the self, the compulsion to repeat the story of trauma, as well as the early stages of (...) from trauma. We are the first to employ trauma theory as a critical framework through which to view Blanche and the dramaturgical devices used to concretize her post-traumatic state of mind. Williams’ heroine speaks from traumatic experience and not from psychic fabrications. Indeed, we contend that the play traces Blanche’s deliberate and self-conscious working through and mourning of the traumatic losses of the past, including her idealized, narcissistic conceptions of herself within a traumatic present. Thus she is more attuned to the most disturbing parts of reality and exhibits tragic insight born of traumatic experience. Critics who see Blanche as “mad” do not fully recognize her struggle to come to terms with trauma and loss within a culture of denial. We conclude that Streetcar stages the inextricable relation between the individual and social dialectics of trauma. (shrink)
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  33. Anika A. Jordbru, Ejgil Jespersen & Egil Martinsen (2008). Conversion Gait Disordermeeting Patients in Behaviour, Reuniting Body and Mind. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 2 (2):185 – 199.score: 4.0
    The Hospital for Rehabilitation, Stavern, in Norway has treated patients with physical symptoms with no organic cause, so called conversion disorder patients, for over a decade. For four years research on the treatment has been carried out. Patients with conversion disorder seem not to fit in traditional somatic hospitals because their patienthood depends upon psychiatric diagnosis. Ironically, they appear not to belong in psychiatric hospitals because of their physical symptoms. The treatment offered these patients at hospitals for rehabilitation is adapted (...)
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  34. Paul W. Andrews, J. Anderson Thomson Jr, Ananda Amstadter & Michael C. Neale (2012). Primum Non Nocere: An Evolutionary Analysis of Whether Antidepressants Do More Harm Than Good. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 4.0
    Antidepressant medications are the first-line treatment for people meeting current diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder. Most antidepressants are designed to perturb the neurotransmitter serotonin—an evolutionarily ancient biochemical found in plants, animals and fungi. Many adaptive processes evolved to be regulated by serotonin, including emotion, development, neuronal growth and death, platelet activation and the clotting process, attention, electrolyte balance, and reproduction. It is a principle of evolutionary medicine that the disruption of evolved adaptations will degrade biological functioning. Because serotonin regulates (...)
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  35. Guro Årdal Åsa Hammar (2009). Cognitive Functioning in Major Depression – A Summary. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 4.0
    The aim of the present paper is to summarize the research during the past decade regarding cognitive functioning in Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). Cognitive impairment in the acute phase of illness has been frequently reported. The findings are shown in different cognitive domains, such as executive functions (EF), attention, memory and psychomotor speed. Fewer reports have investigated cognitive functioning in MDD in longitudinal studies. Some longitudinal reports show that the impairment observed in the acute phase of illness may be long (...)
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  36. Georg Kerkhoff Lena Schmidt, Kathrin S. Utz, Lena Depper, Michaela Adams, Anna-Katharina Schaadt, Stefan Reinhart (2013). Now You Feel Both: Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation Induces Lasting Improvements in the Rehabilitation of Chronic Tactile Extinction. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 3.0
    Tactile extinction is frequent, debilitating and often persistent after brain damage. Currently, there is no treatment available for this disorder. In two previous case studies we showed an influence of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) on tactile extinction. Here, we evaluated in further patients the immediate and lasting effects of GVS on tactile extinction. GVS is known to induce polarity-specific changes in cerebral excitability in the vestibular cortices and adjacent cortical areas. Tactile extinction was examined with the Quality Extinction Test (QET) (...)
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