Search results for 'Referral and Consultation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. A. Jacobson (2002). Keeping the Patient in the Loop: Ethical Issues in Outpatient Referral and Consultation. Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (4):301.score: 120.0
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  2. Carolyn De Coster, Stewart McMillan, Rollin Brant, John McGurran & Tom Noseworthy (2007). The Western Canada Waiting List Project: Development of a Priority Referral Score for Hip and Knee Arthroplasty. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (2):192-197.score: 78.0
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  3. Ken Fyie, Cy Frank, Tom Noseworthy, Tanya Christiansen & Deborah A. Marshall (2014). Evaluating the Primary‐to‐Specialist Referral System for Elective Hip and Knee Arthroplasty. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (1):66-73.score: 78.0
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  4. Michael Weiner, Anthony J. Perkins & Christopher M. Callahan (2010). Errors in Completion of Referrals Among Older Urban Adults in Ambulatory Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (1):76-81.score: 58.0
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  5. Thomas A. Haldis Do & James C. Blankenship Md (2002). Telephone Reporting in the Consultant–Generalist Relationship. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 8 (1):31-35.score: 58.0
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  6. Roy G. Spece, David S. Shimm & Allen E. Buchanan (eds.) (1996). Conflicts of Interest in Clinical Practice and Research. Oxford University Press.score: 54.0
    Our society has long sanctioned, at least tacitly, a degree of conflict of interest in medical practice and clinical research as an unavoidable consequence of the different interests of the physician or clinical investigator, the patient or clinical research subject, third party payers or research sponsors, the government, and society as a whole, to name a few. In the past, resolution of these conflicts has been left to the conscience of the individual physician or clinical investigator and to professional organizations. (...)
     
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  7. L. -C. Huang, C. -H. Chen, H. -L. Liu, H. -Y. Lee, N. -H. Peng, T. -M. Wang & Y. -C. Chang (2013). The Attitudes of Neonatal Professionals Towards End-of-Life Decision-Making for Dying Infants in Taiwan. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):382-386.score: 50.0
    The purposes of research were to describe the neonatal clinicians' personal views and attitudes on neonatal ethical decision-making, to identify factors that might affect these attitudes and to compare the attitudes between neonatal physicians and neonatal nurses in Taiwan. Research was a cross-sectional design and a questionnaire was used to reach different research purposes. A convenient sample was used to recruit 24 physicians and 80 neonatal nurses from four neonatal intensive care units in Taiwan. Most participants agreed with suggesting a (...)
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  8. Je Ffrey Blustein (1993). Doing What the Patient Orders: Maintaining Integrity in the Doctor-Patient Relationship. Bioethics 7 (4):289-314.score: 48.0
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  9. M. A. Martin, T. Lopez, M. Romero, F. Sanchez, P. Lopez & M. Martinez (1997). [What Happens with IUDs Indicated in Family Planning?]. Dialogos 30.score: 48.0
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  10. Craig M. Helbok (2003). The Practice of Psychology in Rural Communities: Potential Ethical Dilemmas. Ethics and Behavior 13 (4):367 – 384.score: 24.0
    The practice of psychology in rural areas offers unique challenges for psychologists as they try to provide optimal care, often with a minimum of resources. Psychologists are frequently required to be creative and flexible in order to provide effective services to a wide range of clients. However, these unique challenges often confront psychologists with ethical dilemmas and problems for which their urban-based training has not prepared them. The author examines how certain characteristics of rural communities may lead to specific ethical (...)
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  11. Jukka Varelius (2008). Ethics Consultation and Autonomy. Science and Engineering Ethics 14 (1):65-76.score: 24.0
    Services of ethics consultants are nowadays commonly used in such various spheres of life as engineering, public administration, business, law, health care, journalism, and scientific research. It has however been maintained that use of ethics consultants is incompatible with personal autonomy; in moral matters individuals should be allowed to make their own decisions. The problem this criticism refers to can be conceived of as a conflict between the professional autonomy of ethics experts and the autonomy of the persons they serve. (...)
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  12. Mark P. Aulisio, Robert M. Arnold & Stuart J. Youngner (eds.) (2003). Ethics Consultation: From Theory to Practice. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 24.0
    In the clinical setting, questions of medical ethics raise a host of perplexing problems, often complicated by conflicting perspectives and the need to make immediate decisions. In this volume, bioethicists and physicians provide a nuanced, in-depth approach to the difficult issues involved in bioethics consultation. Addressing the needs of researchers, clinicians, and other health professionals on the front lines of bioethics practice, the contributors focus primarily on practical concerns -- whether ethics consultation is best done by individuals, teams, (...)
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  13. Andrea Frolic (2011). Who Are We When We Are Doing What We Are Doing? The Case for Mindful Embodiment in Ethics Case Consultation. Bioethics 25 (7):370-382.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the theory and practice of embodied epistemology or mindful embodiment in ethics case consultation. I argue that not only is this epistemology an ethical imperative to safeguard the integrity of this emerging profession, but that it has the potential to improve the quality of ethics consultation (EC). It also has implications for how ethics consultants are trained and how consultation services are organized. My viewpoint is informed by ethnographic research and by my experimental application (...)
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  14. Jane Bickerton, Sue Procter, Barbara Johnson & Angel Medina (2010). A Video Life-World Approach to Consultation Practice: The Relevance of a Socio-Phenomenological Approach. [REVIEW] Human Studies 33 (2):157-171.score: 24.0
    This article discusses the [development and] use of a video life-world schema to explore alternative orientations to the shared health consultation. It is anticipated that this schema can be used by practitioners and consumers alike to understand the dynamics of videoed health consultations, the role of the participants within it and the potential to consciously alter the outcome by altering behaviour during the process of interaction. The study examines health consultation participation and develops an interpretative method of analysis (...)
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  15. Lauren Edelstein, John Lynch, Nneka Mokwunye & Evan DeRenzo (2010). Curbside Consultation Re-Imagined: Borrowing From the Conflict Management Toolkit. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (1):41-49.score: 24.0
    Curbside ethics consultations occur when an ethics consultant provides guidance to a party who seeks assistance over ethical concerns in a case, without the consultant involving other stakeholders, conducting his or her own comprehensive review of the case, or writing a chart note. Some have argued that curbside consultation is problematic because the consultant, in focusing on a single narrative offered by the party seeking advice, necessarily fails to account for the full range of moral perspectives. Their concern is (...)
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  16. Stuart G. Finder & Mark J. Bliton (2011). Responsibility After the Apparent End: 'Following-Up' in Clinical Ethics Consultation. Bioethics 25 (7):413-424.score: 24.0
    Clinical ethics literature typically presents ethics consultations as having clear beginnings and clear ends. Experience in actual clinical ethics practice, however, reflects a different characterization, particularly when the moral experiences of ethics consultants are included in the discussion. In response, this article emphasizes listening and learning about moral experience as core activities associated with clinical ethics consultation. This focus reveals that responsibility in actual clinical ethics practice is generated within the moral scope of an ethics consultant's activities as she (...)
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  17. George J. Agich (2011). Defense Mechanisms in Ethics Consultation. HEC Forum 23 (4):269-279.score: 24.0
    While there is no denying the relevance of ethical knowledge and analytical and cognitive skills in ethics consultation, such knowledge and skills can be overemphasized. They can be effectively put into practice only by an ethics consultant, who has a broad range of other skills, including interpretive and communicative capacities as well as the capacity effectively to address the psychosocial needs of patients, family members, and healthcare professionals in the context of an ethics consultation case. In this paper, (...)
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  18. Jeffrey P. Bishop, Joseph B. Fanning & Mark J. Bliton (2010). Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation? [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (1):171-171.score: 24.0
    Erratum to: Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation? Content Type Journal Article Pages 171-171 DOI 10.1007/s10730-010-9132-7 Authors Jeffrey P. Bishop, Saint Louis University Tenet Chair of Health Care Ethics, Albert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics Salus Center, Room 527, 3545 Lafayette Ave St. Louis MO 63104-1314 USA Joseph B. Fanning, Vanderbilt University Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society 2525 West End Ave., 4th Floor, Suite 400 Nashville TN 37203 USA Mark J. Bliton, Vanderbilt (...)
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  19. Mairi Levitt (2003). Public Consultation in Bioethics. What's the Point of Asking the Public When They Have Neither Scientific nor Ethical Expertise? Health Care Analysis 11 (1):15-25.score: 24.0
    With the rapid development of genetic research and applications in health care there is some agreement among funding and regulatory bodies that the public(s) need to be equipped to deal with the choices that the new technologies will offer them, although this does not necessarily include a role for the public in influencing their development and regulation. This paper considers the methods and purpose of public consultations in the area of genetics including large-scale surveys of opinion, consensus conferences and focus (...)
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  20. Florian Bruns & Andreas Frewer (2011). Ethics Consultation and Empathy. HEC Forum 23 (4):247-255.score: 24.0
    There is no doubt that emotions have an important effect on practices of moral reasoning such as clinical ethics consultation. Empathy is not only a basic human emotion but also an important and learnable skill for health care professionals. A basic amount of empathy is essential both in patient care and in clinical ethics consultation. This article debates the “adequate dose” of empathy in ethics consultations in clinical settings and tries to identify possible situations within the process of (...)
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  21. Stella Reiter-Theil (2003). Balancing the Perspectives. The Patient's Role in Clinical Ethics Consultation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (3):247-254.score: 24.0
    The debate and implementation of Clinical Ethics Consultation (CEC) is still in its beginnings in Europe and the issue of the patient's perspective has been neglected so far, especially at the theoretical and methodological level. At the practical level, recommendations about the involvement of the patient or his/her relatives are missing, reflecting the general lack of quality and practice standards in CEC. Balance of perspectives is a challenge in any interpersonal consultation, which has led to great efforts to (...)
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  22. Michael M. Burgess (2004). Public Consultation in Ethics an Experiment in Representative Ethics. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 1 (1):4-13.score: 24.0
    Genome Canada has funded a research project to evaluate the usefulness of different forms of ethical analysis for assessing the moral weight of public opinion in the governance of genomics. This paper will describe a role of public consultation for ethical analysis and a contribution of ethical analysis to public consultation and the governance of genomics/biotechnology. Public consultation increases the robustness of ethical analysis with a more diverse and rich accounts experiences. Consultation must be carefully and (...)
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  23. Deborah Cummins (2002). The Professional Status of Bioethics Consultation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (1):19-43.score: 24.0
    Is bioethics consultation a profession? Withfew exceptions, the arguments andcounterarguments about whether healthcareethics consultation is a profession haveignored the historical and cultural developmentof professions in the United States, the wayssocial changes have altered the work andboundaries of all professions, and theprofessionalization theories that explain howmodern societies institutionalize expertise inprofessions. This interdisciplinary analysisbegins to fill this gap by framing the debatewithin a larger theoretical context heretoforemissing from the bioethics literature. Specifically, the question of whether ethicsconsultation is a profession is (...)
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  24. Andreas Vieth (2011). Inclusive Consultation: A Hermeneutical Approach to Ethical Deliberation in the Clinical Setting. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 23 (4):295-304.score: 24.0
    The problem of ethical consultations in the clinical setting should be reasonable, but it cannot be reduced to reason and philosophical theory alone. I will argue that emotions are constitutively and discursively relevant features of the evaluative experience of persons. Ethical consultations should include emotions. Emotions like shame and guilt are complex and learned reactions of persons, which form one basis of ethical reflection. I argue that ethical consultation can rely neither on a strict theory or method nor on (...)
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  25. Nicole Mamotte, Douglas Wassenaar, Jennifer Koen & Zaynab Essack (2010). Convergent Ethical Issues in HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria Vaccine Trials in Africa: Report From the WHO/UNAIDS African AIDS Vaccine Programme's Ethics, Law and Human Rights Collaborating Centre Consultation, 10-11 February 2009, Durban, South Africa. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):3-.score: 24.0
    BackgroundAfrica continues to bear a disproportionate share of the global HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) and malaria burden. The development and distribution of safe, effective and affordable vaccines is critical to reduce these epidemics. However, conducting HIV/AIDS, TB, and/or malaria vaccine trials simultaneously in developing countries, or in populations affected by all three diseases, is likely to result in numerous ethical challenges.MethodsIn order to explore convergent ethical issues in HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria vaccine trials in Africa, the Ethics, Law and Human Rights (...)
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  26. Stephen Buetow (2003). The Ethics of Public Consultation in Health Care: An Orthodox Jewish Perspective. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 11 (2):151-160.score: 24.0
    New Zealand and United Kingdom governments have set new directives for increased consultation with the public about health care. Set against a legacy of modest success with past engagement with public consultations, this paper considers potentially adverse ethical implications of the new directives. Drawing on experiences from New Zealand and the United Kingdom, and on an Orthodox Jewish perspective, the paper seeks to answer two questions: What conditions can compromise the ethics of public consultation? How can the public (...)
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  27. J. A. Knottnerus, P. G. Knipschild & F. Sturmans (1989). Symptoms and Selection Bias: The Influence of Selection Towards Specialist Care on the Relationship Between Symptoms and Diagnoses. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 10 (1).score: 24.0
    Observations with respect to the relationship between symptoms and diseases can seriously be biased by selection phenomena. This selection may occur from the general population, via consultation behavior, diagnostic and therapeutic activities of the general practitioner, and by referral.Relationships may be suggested and reproduced even if they do not exist in unselected populations, as a product of diagnostic routines. Correction for selection bias can only be achieved by choosing proper comparison (...)
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  28. Nanon Labrie & Peter J. Schulz (forthcoming). Quantifying Doctors' Argumentation in General Practice Consultation Through Content Analysis: Measurement Development and Preliminary Results. Argumentation:1-23.score: 24.0
    General practice consultation has often been characterized by pragma-dialecticians as an argumentative activity type. These characterizations are typically derived from theoretical insights and qualitative analyses. Yet, descriptions that are based on quantitative data are thus far lacking. This paper provides a detailed account of the development of an instrument to guide the quantitative analysis of argumentation in doctor–patient consultation. It describes the implementation and preliminary results of a content analysis of seventy videotaped medical consultations of which the extent (...)
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  29. Deborah Swiderski, Katharine Ettinger, Mayris Webber & Nancy Dubler (2010). The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project: Preliminary Notes From a Pilot Project to Establish Quality Measures for Ethics Consultation. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 22 (1):65-72.score: 24.0
    The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project (CECP) was intiated in 2007 in response to the lack of uniform standards for both the training of clinical ethics consultants, and for evaluating their work as consultants. CECP participants, all practicing clinical ethics consultants, met monthly to apply a standard evaluation instrument, the QI tool , to their consultation notes. This paper describes, from a qualitative perspective, how participants grappled with applying standards to their work. Although the process was marked by resistance and (...)
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  30. Frances Rieth Ward (2013). Evaluating Parents' Perspectives of Pediatric Ethics Consultation. HEC Forum 25 (2):183-189.score: 24.0
    Ethics consultation is a familiar concept to clinicians, and there are site-specific guidelines detailing procedures for both obtaining and performing these consults. Evaluative data about clinician experiences with ethics consults are becoming more extensive but information about family experiences, especially parent perceptions, of the same is lacking. Without a better understanding of those family experiences, an evidence base for ethics consultations cannot be built. This manuscript describes the reasons for obtaining this necessary information, details prior research designed to obtain (...)
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  31. Silviya Aleksandrova (2008). Survey on the Experience in Ethical Decision-Making and Attitude of Pleven University Hospital Physicians Towards Ethics Consultation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):35-42.score: 24.0
    BackgroundContemporary medical practice is complicated by many dilemmas requiring ethical sensitivity and moral reasoning.ObjectiveTo investigate physicians’ experience in ethical decision-making and their attitude towards ethics consultation.MethodsIn a cross-sectional survey 126 physicians representing the main clinics of Pleven University hospital were investigated by a self-administered questionnaire. The following variables were measured: occurrence, nature and ways of resolving ethical problems; physicians’ attitudes towards ethics consultation; physicians’ opinions on qualities and skills of an ethics consultant, and socio-demographic characteristics. Data analysis included (...)
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  32. Courtenay R. Bruce, Margot M. Eves, Nathan G. Allen, Martin L. Smith, Adam M. Peña, John R. Cheney & Mary A. Majumder (forthcoming). “Systematizing” Ethics Consultation Services. HEC Forum:1-11.score: 24.0
    While valuable work has been done addressing clinical ethics within established healthcare systems, we anticipate that the projected growth in acquisitions of community hospitals and facilities by large tertiary hospitals will impact the field of clinical ethics and the day-to-day responsibilities of clinical ethicists in ways that have yet to be explored. Toward the goal of providing clinical ethicists guidance on a range of issues that they may encounter in the systematization process, we discuss key considerations and potential challenges in (...)
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  33. Yen-Yuan Chen, Tzong-Shinn Chu, Yu-Hui Kao, Pi-Ru Tsai, Tien-Shang Huang & Wen-Je Ko (2014). To Evaluate the Effectiveness of Health Care Ethics Consultation Based on the Goals of Health Care Ethics Consultation: A Prospective Cohort Study with Randomization. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):1.score: 24.0
    The growing prevalence of health care ethics consultation (HCEC) services in the U.S. has been accompanied by an increase in calls for accountability and quality assurance, and for the debates surrounding why and how HCEC is evaluated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of HCEC as indicated by several novel outcome measurements in East Asian medical encounters.
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  34. Stella Reiter-Theil & George J. Agich (2008). Research on Clinical Ethics and Consultation. Introduction to the Theme. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):3-5.score: 24.0
    Clinical ethics consultation has developed from local pioneer projects into a field of growing interest among both clinicians and ethicists. What is needed are more systematic studies on the ethical challenges faced in clinical practice and problem solving through ethics consultation from interdisciplinary perspectives. The Thematic Issue covers a range of topics and includes five recent studies from various European countries and the USA, focusing on issues such as the ethical difficulties of end of life decisions, experiences with (...)
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  35. Marion Danis, Adrienne Farrar, Christine Grady, Carol Taylor, Patricia O'Donnell, Karen Soeken & Connie Ulrich (2008). Does Fear of Retaliation Deter Requests for Ethics Consultation? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):27-34.score: 24.0
    BackgroundReports suggest that some health care personnel fear retaliation from seeking ethics consultation. We therefore examined the prevalence and determinants of fear of retaliation and determined whether this fear is associated with diminished likelihood of consulting an ethics committee.MethodsWe surveyed registered nurses (RNs) and social workers (SWs) in four US states to identify ethical problems they encounter. We developed a retaliation index (1–7 point range) with higher scores indicating a higher perceived likelihood of retaliation. Linear regression analysis was performed (...)
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  36. Richard Sobel (1996). The Virgil Role. Journal of Medical Humanities 17 (2):85-89.score: 24.0
    The referral of a patient for subspecialty consultation and examination is but one facet of the primary care physician's involvement with his patient. Using examples from my practice, I argue that the term “gatekeeper” is an inadequate term for describing what the primary care physician does, or should do, for his patient. “Virgil Role” is offered as an alternative expression based on a proposed parallel between Dante's passage through the Inferno accompanied by his mentor-guide, Virgil, and a sick (...)
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  37. Joachim P. Sturmberg & Paul Cilliers (2009). Time and the Consultation – an Argument for a 'Certain Slowness'. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 15 (5):881-885.score: 24.0
    When natural time sequences were replaced by clocks, time became a measurable commodity and the ‘speedy use of time’ a virtue. In medical practice shorter consultations allow more patients to be seen, whereas longer consultations result in a better understanding of the patient and her problems. Crossing the line of time-efficiency and time-effectiveness compromises the balance between short-term turnover and long-term outcomes. The consultation has all the hallmarks of a complex adaptive system whose characteristics are not determined by the (...)
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  38. Jeffrey Spike (2001). Cultural Diversity and Patients with Reduced Capacity: The Use of Ethics Consultation to Advocate for Mentally Handicapped Persons in Living Organ Donation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (6):519-526.score: 22.0
    Living organ donation will soon become the source of the majority of organs donations for transplant. Should mentally handicapped people be allowed to donate, or should they be considered a vulnerable group in need of protection? I discuss three cases of possible living organ donors who are developmentally disabled, from three different cultures, the United States, Germany, and India. I offer a brief discussion of three issues raised by the cases: (1) cultural diversity and cultural relativism; (2) autonomy, rationality, and (...)
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  39. Ajay Aggarwal, Joanna Davies & Richard Sullivan (2014). “Nudge” in the Clinical Consultation – an Acceptable Form of Medical Paternalism? BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):31.score: 22.0
    Libertarian paternalism is a concept derived from cognitive psychology and behavioural science. It is behind policies that frame information in such a way as to encourage individuals to make choices which are in their best interests, while maintaining their freedom of choice. Clinicians may view their clinical consultations as far removed from the realms of cognitive psychology but on closer examination there are a number of striking similarities.
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  40. Frederick T. Travis, Alarik T. Arenander & D. DuBois (2004). Psychological and Physiological Characteristics of a Proposed Object-Referral/Self-Referral Continuum of Self-Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):401-420.score: 21.0
  41. J. M. Craig & Thomas May (2005). Evaluating the Outcomes of Ethics Consultation. Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (2):168-180.score: 21.0
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  42. N. N. Dubler (2012). The Art of the Chart Note in Clinical Ethics Consultation and Bioethics Mediation: Conveying Information That Can Be Understood and Evaluated. Journal of Clinical Ethics 24 (2):148-155.score: 21.0
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  43. L. Rasmussen (2012). The Chiaroscuro of Accountability in the Second Edition of the Core Competencies for Healthcare Ethics Consultation. Journal of Clinical Ethics 24 (1):32-40.score: 21.0
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  44. Elizabeth Davies, Beverley Van Der Molen & Amanda Cranston (2007). Using Clinical Audit, Qualitative Data From Patients and Feedback From General Practitioners to Decrease Delay in the Referral of Suspected Colorectal Cancer. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (2):310-317.score: 21.0
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  45. R. A. Greenberg, K. W. Anstey, R. Macri, A. Heesters, S. Bean & R. Zlotnik Shaul (2014). Bioethics Consultation Practices and Procedures: A Survey of a Large Canadian Community of Practice. HEC Forum 26 (2):135-146.score: 21.0
    The literature fails to reflect general agreement over the nature of the services and procedures provided by bioethicists, and the training and core competencies this work requires. If bioethicists are to define their activities in a consistent way, it makes sense to look for common ground in shared communities of practice. We report results of a survey of the services and procedures among bioethicists affiliated with the University of Toronto Joint Centre for Bioethics (JCB). This is the largest group of (...)
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  46. A. Paige Baker (1993). Physicians' Self-Referral: Ethics Versus Economics? Office of Local Government.score: 21.0
     
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  47. Marion Danis (ed.) (2012). Clinical Research Consultation: A Casebook. Oxford University Press.score: 21.0
    Starting research -- Enrolling research participants -- Protecting research participants -- Conducting research with vulnerable populations -- Balancing clinical research and clinical care -- Navigating interpersonal difficulties -- Ending research.
     
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  48. E. G. Howe & C. Howe (2007). Three Keys to Treating Inmates and Their Application in Ethics Consultation. Journal of Clinical Ethics 19 (3):195-203.score: 21.0
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  49. Josiane Junod (2004). La consultation conjugale et ses points de repère. Dialogue 4:67-76.score: 21.0
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  50. Leena E. Tuomisto, Erhola Marina, Kaila Minna, Pirkko E. Brander, Kauppinen Ritva, Puolijoki Hannu & Kekki Pertti (2007). The Finnish National Asthma Programme: Communication in Asthma Care – Quality Assessment of Asthma Referral Letters. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (1):50-54.score: 21.0
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