Search results for 'Reflection (Philosophy History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  47
    Stephan Blatti (2009). Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy (Review). [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 463-464.
    This is a review of Sara Heinämaa, Vili Lähteenmäki, Pauliina Remes (ed.), Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy (Dordrecht: Springer 2007).
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  2. Carlos Alberto Blanco (2011). The Transition From Philosophy to Theology in the Reflection on History in Wolfhart Pannenberg. Pensamiento 67 (254):869-885.
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  3. P. Horak (1983). Tendencies of the Reflection of History in Contemporary French Bourgeois Philosophy. Filosoficky Casopis 31 (3):418-425.
     
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  4.  15
    David Carr (2007). Religious Education, Religious Literacy and Common Schooling: A Philosophy and History of Skewed Reflection. Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (4):659–673.
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  5. Dm Armstrong & G. Bar-Elli (1988). Can a Naturalist Believe in Universals? In Science in Reflection. The Israel Colloquium: Studies in History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science (Vol. 3). [REVIEW] Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 110:103-122.
     
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  6. Lj Cohen & em ZEmach (1988). Realism Versus Anti-Realism: What Is the Issue? In Science in Reflection. The Israel Colloquium: Studies in History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science (Vol. 3). [REVIEW] Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 110:81-101.
     
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  7. J. Elster & M. Dascal (1988). The Nature and Scope of Rational-Choice Explanation in Science in Reflection. The Israel Colloquium: Studies in History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science (Vol. 3). [REVIEW] Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 110:51-79.
     
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  8. Jl Heilbron (1988). The Earliest Missionaries of the Copenhagen Spirit in Science in Reflection. The Israel Colloquium: Studies in History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science (Vol. 3). [REVIEW] Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 110:201-233.
     
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  9. Cg Hempel & Y. Ben-Menachem (1988). Limits of a Deductive Construal of the Function of Scientific Theories in Science in Reflection. The Israel Colloquium: Studies in History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science (Vol. 3). [REVIEW] Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 110:1-22.
     
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  10. Tp Hughes (1988). The Era of Independent Inventors in Science in Reflection: The Israel Colloquium: Studies in History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science (Volume 3). Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 110:151-168.
     
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  11. P. Kerszberg (1988). The Hermeneutical Status of the History of Science: The Views of Hélène Metzger. A Comment in Science in Reflection: The Israel Colloquium: Studies in History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science (Volume 3). Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 110:145-150.
     
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  12. L. Kruger (1988). How Philosophy and Science Came to Differ in Science in Reflection. The Israel Colloquium: Studies in History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science (Vol. 3). [REVIEW] Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 110:37-50.
     
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  13. T. Lenoir (1988). Social Interests and the Organic Physics of 1847 in Science in Reflection: The Israel Colloquium: Studies in History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science (Volume 3). [REVIEW] Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 110:169-191.
     
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  14. G. Stent (1988). Cognitive Limits of Science in Science in Reflection. The Israel Colloquium: Studies in History, Philosophy, and Sociology of Science (Vol. 3). [REVIEW] Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 110:23-36.
     
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  15.  78
    Sara Heinämaa, Vili Lähteenmäki & Pauliina Remes (2007). Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy. Springer.
  16. Jon Miller (2007). Consciousness: From Perception to Reflection in the History of Philosophy. Springer.
     
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  17. Aaron D. Cobb (2011). History and Scientific Practice in the Construction of an Adequate Philosophy of Science: Revisiting a Whewell/Mill Debate. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):85-93.
    William Whewell raised a series of objections concerning John Stuart Mill’s philosophy of science which suggested that Mill’s views were not properly informed by the history of science or by adequate reflection on scientific practices. The aim of this paper is to revisit and evaluate this incisive Whewellian criticism of Mill’s views by assessing Mill’s account of Michael Faraday’s discovery of electrical induction. The historical evidence demonstrates that Mill’s reconstruction is an inadequate reconstruction of this historical episode and (...)
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  18.  4
    James Alexander (2016). The Philosophy of Political History in Oakeshott and Collingwood. Journal of the Philosophy of History 10 (2):279-303.
    _ Source: _Volume 10, Issue 2, pp 279 - 303 Every political philosopher has a philosophy of political history, if sometimes not a very good one. Oakeshott and Collingwood are two twentieth century political philosophers who were particularly concerned with the significance of history for political philosophy; and who both, in the 1940s, sketched what I call philosophies of political history: that is, systematic schemes which could make sense of the entire history of political philosophy. In (...)
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  19.  5
    James Alexander (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Political History in Oakeshott and Collingwood. New Content is Available for Journal of the Philosophy of History.
    _ Source: _Page Count 25 Every political philosopher has a philosophy of political history, if sometimes not a very good one. Oakeshott and Collingwood are two twentieth century political philosophers who were particularly concerned with the significance of history for political philosophy; and who both, in the 1940s, sketched what I call philosophies of political history: that is, systematic schemes which could make sense of the entire history of political philosophy. In this article I observe that (...)
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  20.  32
    Frank Ankersmit (2009). Danto's Philosophy of History in Retrospective. Journal of the Philosophy of History 3 (2):109-145.
    Danto's Analytical Philosopy of History is one of the undisputed classics of post-war reflection on the nature of historical writing. Upon its publication in 1965 it was immediately recognized to be a major contribution to contemporary historical thought. Strangely enough, however, little effort was made by philosophers of history to penetrate into the depth of Danto's argument. The explanation is, perhaps, that there was more than a hint of historicism in Danto's conception of historical writing and for (...)
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  21.  5
    Anna Mudde (2015). Self‐Images and “Perspicuous Representations”: Reflection, Philosophy, and the Glass Mirror. Metaphilosophy 46 (4-5):539-554.
    Reflection names the central activity of Western philosophical practice; the mirror and its attendant metaphors of reflection are omnipresent in the self-image of Western philosophy and in metaphilosophical reflection on reflection. But the physical experiences of being reflected by glass mirrors have been inadequately theorized contributors to those metaphors, and this has implications not only for the self-image and the self of philosophy but also for metaphilosophical practice. This article begins to rethink the metaphor of (...) anew. Paying attention to the history of the glass mirror in Europe reveals and challenges the modern emergence of clear ontological distinctions between disembodied subjects and the objects of their knowledge, and suggests a compelling terrain of metaphilosophical analysis. On the reading offered by the article, the inherent complexity of the relationship between selves and their mirror images, a complexity mediated by social location, historical situation, and particular projects, points to significant spaces of unknowing, of indeterminacy, and of ontological ambiguity. (shrink)
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  22.  8
    Marc Depaepe (2007). Philosophy and History of Education: Time to Bridge the Gap? Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (1):28–43.
    In this article, the relationship between philosophy and history of education is delved into. First, it is noted that both disciplines have diverged from each other over the last few decades to become relatively autonomous subsectors within the pedagogical sciences, each with its own discourses, its own expositional characteristics, its own channels of communication, and its own networks. From the perspective of the history of education, it seems as though more affiliation has been sought with the science of (...)
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  23.  4
    James Alexander (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Political History in Oakeshott and Collingwood. Brill.
    _ Source: _Page Count 25 Every political philosopher has a philosophy of political history, if sometimes not a very good one. Oakeshott and Collingwood are two twentieth century political philosophers who were particularly concerned with the significance of history for political philosophy; and who both, in the 1940s, sketched what I call philosophies of political history: that is, systematic schemes which could make sense of the entire history of political philosophy. In this article I observe that (...)
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  24. Peter Simons (2003). Bocheński and Balance: System and History in Analytic Philosophy. Studies in East European Thought 55 (4):281-297.
    Using the work of Józef Bocheski as apositive example, this paper sets out the casefor a balanced use of historical knowledge indoing analytic philosophy. Between the twoextremes of relativizing historicism, whichdenies absolute truth, and arrogant scientism,which denies any constructive role for thehistory of ideas in philosophy, lies a viamedia in which historical reflection onconcepts and their history is placed at theservice of the system of cognitive philosophy.Knowledge of the history of philosophy, whilenot a sine qua non, can (...)
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  25.  24
    Theodore Arabatzis (2011). Integrating History and Philosophy of Science. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 263:125-139.
    In this chapter I investigate the prospects of integrated history and philosophy of science, by examining how philosophical issues raised by “hidden entities”, entities that are not accessible to unmediated observation, can enrich the historical investigation of their careers. Conversely, I suggest that the history of those entities has important lessons to teach to the philosophy of science. Hidden entities have played a crucial role in the development of the natural sciences. Despite their centrality to past scientific practice, (...)
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  26.  26
    Raphael Scholl & Tim Räz, Towards a Methodology for Integrated History and Philosophy of Science.
    We respond to two kinds of skepticism about integrated history and philosophy of science: foundational and methodological. Foundational skeptics doubt that the history and the philosophy of science have much to gain from each other in principle. We therefore discuss some of the unique rewards of work at the intersection of the two disciplines. By contrast, methodological skeptics already believe that the two disciplines should be related to each other, but they doubt that this can be done successfully. (...)
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  27.  8
    E. van der Zweerde (2009). The Place of Russian Philosophy in World Philosophical History -- A Perspective. Diogenes 56 (2-3):170-186.
    This paper sketches the ambitious outlines of an assessment of the place of Russian philosophy in philosophical history ‘at large’, i.e. on a global and world-historical scale. At the same time, it indicates, rather modestly, a number of elements and aspects of such a project. A retrospective reflection and reconstruction is not only a recurrent phenomenon in philosophical culture (which, the author assumes, has become global), it also is, by virtue of its being a philosophical reflection, one (...)
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  28.  39
    Thomas Williams, Some Reflections on Method in the History of Philosophy.
    So I present myself this morning not as an expert with wisdom to impart, but as a neophyte reflecting on his own practice with a view toward getting clearer on the vision of philosophical historiography that underlies it and thereby, perhaps, improving that practice. The paper will fall into two tenuously connected parts. The first part contains a general reflection on method that I wrote a few years back which has since been published in Czech but has not had (...)
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  29.  18
    Louis Dupré (1989). Is the History of Philosophy Philosophy? Review of Metaphysics 42 (3):463 - 482.
    Philosophical reflection claims a permanent quality that makes the knowledge of its past a vital concern to present philosophy. Yet each system, Being culturally conditioned, Belongs to a particular epoch. The permanence of the time-Bound can be explained only if the succession of history itself possesses an ontological significance that survives the passing of culture. This in turn presupposes the existence of genuine ontological novelty. The history of philosophy shows how the "new" introduced by each epoch acquires (...)
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  30. David Michael Kleinberg-Levin (ed.) (1999). Sites of Vision: The Discursive Construction of Sight in the History of Philosophy. The MIT Press.
    In recent years scholars from many disciplines have become interested in the "construction" of the human senses -- in how the human environment shapes both how and what we perceive. Taking a very different approach to the question of construction, Sites of Vision turns to language and explores the ways in which the rhetoric of philosophy has formed the nature of vision and how, in turn, the rhetoric of vision has helped to shape philosophical thought. The central role of vision (...)
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  31. Dario Perinetti (2006). Philosophical Reflection on History. In Knud Haakonssen (ed.), The Cambridge History of Eighteenth-Century Philosophy. Cambridge University Press 2--1108.
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  32.  22
    Robin Findlay Hendry & Ian James Kidd (2016). Introduction: Historiography and the Philosophy of the Sciences. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 55:1-2.
    The history of science and the philosophy of science have a long and tangled relationship. On the one hand, philosophical reflection on science can be guided, shaped, and challenged by historical scholarship—a process begun by Thomas Kuhn and continued by successive generations of ‘post-positivist’ historians and philosophers of science. On the other hand, the activity of writing the history of science raises methodological questions concerning, for instance, progress in science, realism and antirealism, and the semantics of scientific (...)
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  33.  10
    S. V. Turovskaia (2003). Philosophy Is a Reflection on Culture. Russian Studies in Philosophy 41 (4):83-86.
    In the process of history, not only models of the world, but the very subject of philosophy, changes. Therefore, it seems to me, it is not quite right to reject the definition of culture as a personal or subjective aspect of history just because subject and object are attributes of rational knowledge. If we speak of culture as the being in which man lives, the question naturally arises as to how man can exist without being related to society (...)
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  34. Mark Kulstad (1991). Leibniz on Apperception, Consciousness, and Reflection. Philosophia.
  35.  15
    J. C. Nyìri (1999). Philosophy, Education, and the History of Communication Technologies. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 3:185-192.
    The emergence and development of the humanities were initially bound up with the spread of alphabetic writing, and subsequently with the development of printing; the original task of the nascent humanities disciplines was a thoroughly practical one: that of building up our knowledge about the characteristics of the new media with the aim of exploiting this knowledge in everyday life—for the sake of economic, educational, or political benefits. In particular, the beginnings of philosophy lead us back to the times of (...)
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  36.  1
    Fiachra Long (1989). Blondel on the Origin of Philosophy. Philosophy Today 33 (1):21-27.
    Maurice Blondel's articles from 1906 on the origin of philosophy opens with the idea of whether philosophy is be spontaneous or whether it requires specific training. Behind this question lies the more fundamental issue of the relative balance of science and life and where philosophy finds its more natural home.
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  37.  31
    Shadi Bartsch (2006). The Mirror of the Self: Sexuality, Self-Knowledge, and the Gaze in the Early Roman Empire. University of Chicago Press.
    People in the ancient world thought of vision as both an ethical tool and a tactile sense, akin to touch. Gazing upon someone—or oneself—was treated as a path to philosophical self-knowledge, but the question of tactility introduced an erotic element as well. In The Mirror of the Self , Shadi Bartsch asserts that these links among vision, sexuality, and self-knowledge are key to the classical understanding of the self. Weaving together literary theory, philosophy, and social history, Bartsch traces this (...)
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  38.  41
    George Khushf (1997). Why Bioethics Needs the Philosophy of Medicine: Some Implications of Reflection on Concepts of Health and Disease. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).
    Germund Hesslow has argued that concepts of health and disease serve no important scientific, clinical, or ethical function. However, this conclusion depends upon the particular concept of disease he espouses; namely, on Boorse's functional notion. The fact/value split embodied in the functional notion of disease leads to a sharp split between the science of medicine and bioethics, making the philosophy of medicine irrelevant for both. By placing this disease concept in the broader context of medical history, I shall show (...)
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  39.  12
    Marcin Julian Pańków (2013). The Meaning of History in Siemek's Philosophy of Marek Siemek. Dialogue and Universalism 19 (3/5):245-250.
    In the paper I try to define some basic ideas and sketch a style of Marek Siemek’s epistemological reflection and its influence on the notion of do called “meaning of history”. I referee some elements of his interpretation of Kant and Hegel as a background to paradox of “meaning of the history”—the paradox of its necessary transcendence and immanence, the contradiction between a history as an eschatology, and history as a “project”, a dialectic of sense (...)
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  40.  9
    Joachim Thiel (1991). The Crisis of the Roman Empire. History, Historiography, and Historical Reflection. Selected Papers. Philosophy and History 24 (1/2):66-67.
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  41.  7
    Paula Ripamonti (2011). Ethics, Politics and History: Dimensions of Humanism in Hannah Arendt's Philosophical Reflection. Estudios de Filosofía Práctica E Historia de Las Ideas 13 (1):59-66.
    En el marco del debate humanista del siglo XX, el pensamiento político de Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) se constituye como una de las voces críticas y testimoniales que buscaron reflexionar sobre lo acontecido en la Segunda Guerra Mundial. A partir de su propia experiencia como judía en la Alemania de las primeras décadas de su siglo y como intelectual exiliada, concentró sus esfuerzos en comprender el significado filosófico y político de lo ocurrido. Sin pretender afirmar o definir la naturaleza humana sin (...)
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  42. Paul Ziche (2012). Monist Philosophy of Science : Between Worldview and Scientific Meta-Reflection. In Todd H. Weir (ed.), Monism: Science, Philosophy, Religion, and the History of a Worldview. Palgrave Macmillan
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  43.  5
    Franz X. Arnold (1969). Brief History of Western Liturgy. Report and Reflection. Philosophy and History 2 (2):151-154.
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  44. Rolf Petri (2012). The Idea of Culture and the History of Emotions. Historein 12:21-37.
    The essay operates an itemisation of the three main streams in the history of emotions: the history of individual emotions, the study of the role that emotions have in historical processes, and the reflection on the influence of emotions on history writing. The second part of the article is devoted to the methodological and theoretical status of the study of past emotions. It highlights how many studies in the history of emotions remain heavily conditioned by (...)
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  45.  16
    Charles Taliaferro (2005). Evidence and Faith: Philosophy and Religion Since the Seventeenth Century. Cambridge University Press.
    Charles Taliaferro has written a dynamic narrative history of philosophical reflection on religion from the seventeenth century to the present, with an emphasis on shifting views of faith and the nature of evidence. The book begins with the movement called Cambridge Platonism, which formed a bridge between the ancient and medieval worlds and early modern philosophy. While the book provides a general overview of different movements in philosophy, it also offers a detailed exposition and reflection on key (...)
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  46.  3
    Jacob Neusner (1992). The Transformation of Judaism: From Philosophy to Religion. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    "Neusner moves beyond the interpretation of individual texts to grasp as wholes two systems of Judaism, that of the Mishnah and that represented by Rabbinic documents of the fifth century. He thus provides an entirely fresh approach and a new answer to the central question 'What is Judaism?' At the same time, by providing a sound model for the evaluation and comparison of diverse religious systems, this book has an important place within the study of the history of religions (...)
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  47.  18
    Vincent G. Potter (ed.) (1988). Doctrine and Experience: Essays in American Philosophy. Fordham University Press.
    This collection of thirteen essays, when viewed together, offers a unique perspective on the history of American philosophy. It illuminates for the first time in book form, how thirteen major American philosophical thinkers viewed a problem of special interest in the American philosophical tradition: the relationship between experience and reflection. Written by well-known authorities on the figure about which he or she writes, the essays are arranged chronologically to highlight the changes and developments in thought from Puritanism to (...)
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  48. Andrew Benjamin (1988). Reviews : Rodolphe Gasché, The Tain of the Mirror: Derrida and the Philosophy of Reflection, London: Harvard University Press, 1986, £22.25, Viii × 348 Pp. John Sallis, Spacings - Of Reason and Imagination: In Texts of Kant, Fichte, Hegel, London: University of Chicago Press, 1987, £19.95, Paper £8.75, Xvi + 177 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 1 (2):283-287.
  49.  1
    James Kent (forthcoming). Vico, Collingwood, and the Materiality of the Past. New Content is Available for Journal of the Philosophy of History.
    _ Source: _Page Count 24 The project of this paper is a reconstruction of the philosophy of Giambattista Vico via its confrontation with that of R. G. Collingwood. The aims are twofold: the first part seeks to rescue Vico’s peculiar form of what I call philosophical ‘materiality’ from the later idealist universal histories that would subsume him, while the second explores Vico’s idea of divine providence, particularly his differentiation between it and fate. Materiality and divine providence are importantly linked. I (...)
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  50.  28
    Diarmuid Costello & Margaret Iversen (2012). Introduction: Photography Between Art History and Philosophy. Critical Inquiry 38 (4):679-693.
    The essays collected in this special issue of Critical Inquiry are devoted to reflection on the shifts in photographically based art practice, exhibition, and reception in recent years and to the changes brought about by these shifts in our understanding of photographic art. Although initiated in the 1960s, photography as a mainstream artistic practice has accelerated over the last two decades. No longer confined to specialist galleries, books, journals, and other distribution networks, contemporary art photographers are now regularly the (...)
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