Search results for 'Reformation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    Wendy Wheeler (2015). The Wrecked Vessel: The Effects of Gnosticism, Nominalism and the Protestant Reformation in the Semiotic Scaffolding of Modern Scientific Consciousness. Biosemiotics 8 (2):305-324.
    This essay discusses the semiotic scaffolding of modern science, the roots of which lie in the Protestant Reformation and the latter’s repudiation of the “semiotics of nature” upon which medieval theology depended. Taking the fourteenth-century battles between realism and nominalism as the semiotic scaffolding of the Reformation which was subsequently built on nominalist principles, and the Reformation as what made possible the development of early modern science, this essay argues that nominalism, Protestantism, and early modern science were (...)
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  2.  15
    Erika Rummel (2000). The Confessionalization of Humanism in Reformation Germany. Oxford University Press.
    This book deals with the impact of the Reformation debate in Germany on the most prominent intellectual movement of the time: humanism Although it is true that humanism influenced the course of the Reformation, says Erika Rummel, the dynamics of the relationship are better described by saying that humanism was co-opted, perhaps even exploited, in the religious debate.
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  3.  3
    Herman Westerink (2012). The Heart of Man's Desire: Lacanian Psychoanalysis and Early Reformation Thought. Routledge.
    Working from an innovative perspective, this book explores the close relationship between Freudian psychoanalysis and the ideas of the early Reformation.
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  4.  13
    Risto Saarinen (2011). Weakness of Will in Renaissance and Reformation Thought. Oxford University Press.
    In addition to considering the work of a broad range of Renaissance authors (including Petrarch, Donato Acciaiuoli, John Mair, and Francesco Piccolomini), Risto ...
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  5. Alister E. Mcgrath (1987). The Intellectual Origins of the European Reformation.
     
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  6.  12
    Rienk Vermij (2010). A Science of Signs. Aristotelian Meteorology in Reformation Germany. Early Science and Medicine 15 (6):648-674.
    Luther, directly opposing the naturalism of Aristotelian natural philosophy, held that unusual events were often worked directly by either God or the devil, not by natural forces. His ideas were taken up and defended in a more philosophical way by authors like Joachim Camerarius and Caspar Peucer. At the university of Wittenberg, they deeply influenced the teaching of natural philosophy. The field most affected was meteorology , which obtained a prominent place. Meteorological text-books emphasised the final causes of the phenomena (...)
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  7. Reinhard P. Becker (ed.) (1982). German Humanism and Reformation. Continuum.
  8. Chris K. Huebner & Tripp York (eds.) (2010). The Gift of Difference: Radical Orthodoxy, Radical Reformation. Cmu Press.
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  9.  17
    Charles Edward Trinkaus, John W. O'Malley, Thomas M. Izbicki & Gerald Christianson (eds.) (1993). Humanity and Divinity in Renaissance and Reformation: Essays in Honor of Charles Trinkaus. E.J. Brill.
    The volume contains studies by eleven distinguished scholars, concerning changes in ethical and religious consciousness during this important era of Western ...
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  10.  1
    Andrew Weeks (1996). Paracelsus: Speculative Theory and the Crisis of the Early Reformation. State University of New York Press.
    Paracelsus is commonly regarded as one of the great figures of sixteenth-century Europe and of German intellectual history. This book examines the content of his writings in order to clarify it and its historical context.
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  11.  33
    Francesco Pupa (2010). On the Russellian Reformation. Philosophical Studies 147 (2):247 - 271.
    Recently, an orthodox Russellian tenet has come under fire from within. In particular, some Russellians now argue that definite descriptions don’t semantically encode uniqueness. Instead, Reformed Russellians, as I call them, hold that definite descriptions are truth-theoretically identical to indefinite ones. On this approach, a definite description’s uniqueness reading becomes a matter of pragmatics, not semantics. These reforms, we’re told, provide both empirical and methodological benefits over and above the prevailing orthodoxy. As I argue, however, the Russellian Reformation contains (...)
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  12.  6
    Mark Painter (2001). Language and Moral Justification in Pre-Reformation Philosophy. Journal of Philosophical Research 26:399-421.
    In this paper I argue that the influence of Lutheran and Calvinist theology on the philosophy of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries is the reconception and consequent curtailment of the power and role of language in philosophical thought. Prior to this influence, ethics is the basis for pre-Reformation philosophy, in that it entails a basic teleological conception of human nature upon which other branches of philosophical thought are based. Thus the primary objective of pre-Reformation philosophy is the justification (...)
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  13.  41
    Christopher W. Gowans (2002). Practical Identities and Autonomy: Korsgaard's Reformation of Kant's Moral Philosophy. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (3):546-570.
    Kant has long been taxed with an inability to explain the detailed normative content of our lives by making universalizability the sole arbiter of our values. Korsgaard addresses one form of this critique by defending a Kantian theory amended by a seemingly attractive conception of practical identities. Identities are dependent on the contingent circumstances of each person's world. Hence, obligations issuing from them differ from Kantian moral obligations in not applying to all persons. Still, Korsgaard takes Kantian autonomy to mean (...)
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  14.  22
    Joseph S. Freedman (2001). "Professionalization" and "Confessionalization": The Place of Physics, Philosophy, and Arts Instruction At Central European Academic Institutions During the Reformation Era. Early Science and Medicine 6 (4):334-352.
    During the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, physics was regularly taught as part of instruction in philosophy and the arts at Central European schools and universities. However, physics did not have a special or privileged status within that instruction. Three general indicators of this lack of special status are suggested in this article. First, teachers of physics usually were paid less than teachers of most other university-level subject-matters. Second, very few Central European academics during this period appear to have made (...)
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  15.  4
    Daniel M. Gross (2000). Melanchthon's Rhetoric and the Practical Origins of Reformation Human Science. History of the Human Sciences 13 (3):5-22.
    At the beginning of the 16th century in Germany, religious ends and human art joined forces to produce a sacred rhetoric: a rhetoric that could transform human nature, and explain at the same time how such transformation was possible according to both science and scripture. No longer was it enough to ask in Scholastic fashion ‘What is man?’ - his essence and unique faculties, his special place in God’s world. A new question took on urgency in the wake of religious (...)
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  16.  5
    Roland J. Teske (1996). Individuation in Scholasticism: The Later Middle Ages and the Counter-Reformation, 1150- 1650 (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (1):142-143.
    149 JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY 34: ~ JANUARY 1996 theology and intellectual history. One should value the information it provides and the methodological lessons it has to teach but not rely too heavily on its presentation of philosophical issues and arguments. BONNIE KENT Columbia University Jorge J. E. Gracia, editor. Individuation in Scholasticism: The Later Middle Ages and the Counter-Reformation, r r5o-x65o. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1994. Pp. xiv + 619. Paper, $22.95. This impressive (...)
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  17.  2
    Ingeborg Berlin Vogelstein (1997). Reformation Pamphlets. Philosophy and Theology 10 (2):501-524.
    By way of introduction, this paper points out inherent problems in attempting a comprehensive social history of the Reformation, due to the complex dynamics at work in sixteenth century European society.Contemporary pamphlet literature, a resource as yet not intensively explored, reflects in a unique manner the rich variety of the Reformation experience in all walks of life, from both sides of the schism. By examining a representative sampling of such tracts, the essay strives to establish some immediacy to (...)
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  18.  9
    William Eamon (1998). Cannibalism and Contagion: Framing Syphilis in Counter-Reformation Italy. Early Science and Medicine 3 (1):1-31.
    The outbreak of syphilis in Europe elicited a variety of responses concerning the disease's origins and cure. In this essay, I examine the theory of the origins of syphilis advanced by the 16th-century Italian surgeon Leonardo Fioravanti. According to Fioravanti, syphilis was not new but had always existed, although it was unknown to the ancients. The syphilis epidemic, he argued, was caused by cannibalism among the French and Italian armies during the siege of Naples in 1494. Fioravanti's strange and novel (...)
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  19.  20
    Andrew Robinson (2005). Towards an Intellectual Reformation: The Critique of Common Sense and the Forgotten Revolutionary Project of Gramscian Theory. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (4):469-481.
    Abstract This article examines Gramsci?s theory of common sense and the implications of this theory for understanding social transformation and theorising political activity. Gramsci analyses common sense as a pervasive, though confused and contradictory, variety of ideology. For Gramsci the point is to challenge and question this pervasive ideology and its incoherence, confusion, passivity, and political conservatism. The task is to involve the construction of a new conception of the world, in opposition to existing belief?systems, and what he terms an (...)
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  20.  4
    H. G. Ulrich (2012). The Future of Ethics Within the Reformation Heritage. Studies in Christian Ethics 25 (2):174-180.
    Looking for ‘the future of Christian ethics’ we have to be aware of different paradigms of theological ethics and its different implications for a theologically reflected notion of future. With regard to the Reformation heritage there can be identified a Protestant paradigm of a Christian moral subject, liberated for a universal rational responsibility related to the future of the human condition on the one hand, and—according to a Lutheran grammar—an ethics of Christian practices within a worshipping community, grounded in (...)
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  21.  3
    Leonora Tubbs Tisdale & Friedrich W. de Wet (2014). Contemporary Prophetic Preaching Theory in the United States of America and South Africa: A Comparative Study Through the Lens of Shared Reformation Roots. Hts Theological Studies 70 (2):01-08.
    In this article two homileticians - one from the United States of America (USA) and one from South Africa (SA) - enter into a dialog regarding how the task of prophetic preaching today might be revived, reframed and redefined in light of the Reformation principle of the viva vox Evangelii [living voice of the gospel]. Each author begins by summarising four contemporary approaches to prophetic preaching set forth by Reformed and Lutheran homiletical scholars in their respective contexts. Then each (...)
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  22.  3
    Michael Printy (2012). Protestantism and Progress in the Year XII: Charles Villers's Essay on the Spirit and Influence of Luther's Reformation (1804). Modern Intellectual History 9 (2):303-329.
    This article examines Charles Villers's Essay on the Spirit and Influence of Luther's Reformation (1804) in its intellectual and historical context. Exiled from France after 1792, Villers intervened in important French and German debates about the relationship of religion, history, and philosophy. The article shows how he took up a German Protestant discussion on the meaning of the Reformation that had been underway from the 1770s through the end of the century, including efforts by Kantians to seize the (...)
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  23.  17
    Basileios Kroustallis (2005). Descartes on Passion Reformation. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 87 (3):312-323.
    Descartes’ account of emotion conflict in the Passions of the Soul has recently been the subject of Shapiro’s essay (2003), who claims that agent evaluation of the human good operates as an explanatory factor for the reformation of existing mind-body associations. On the contrary, it is here argued that this passion reformation involves explicit reasoning processes, and that the tendency to promote the good of the human being either denotes the cause and not the reason for the original (...)
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  24.  2
    James A. Nash (1996). Toward the Ecological Reformation of Christianity. Interpretation 50 (1):5-15.
    Christian theology and ethics are largely inadequate to confront the ecological crisis of today. They are in need of reformation. At the center of Christian faith, we shall not find a mandate to pollute, plunder, and prey on the rest of nature. Instead, we shall discover that the core affirmations endow all life with a moral significance that entails human responsibility toward the whole of nature.
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  25.  5
    Gilbert Meilaender (1995). "Veritatis Splendor": Reopening Some Questions of the Reformation. Journal of Religious Ethics 23 (2):225 - 238.
    The papal encyclical "Veritatis Splendor", issued in 1993, treats in detail important questions of moral theory and is clearly an important moment in the history of Christian ethics. Supporters and critics of the encyclical have tended to focus attention upon its defense of an objectively true morality and its contention that some acts are intrinsically evil. This discussion overlooks questions that one might address to the encyclical from the perspective of the Reformation. The most fundamental of these is the (...)
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  26. Yaḥyá Ibn ʻAdī (2002). The Reformation of Morals: A Parallel Arabic-English Text. Brigham Young University Press.
    Under the title The Reformation of Morals , the tenth-century Syrian Orthodox scholar Yahya ibn 'Adi offered encouragement to the effort to promote moral perfection, especially among kings and other members of the social elite: his tract, on the social virtues and vices, gives extensive advice about the cultivation of the former and the extirpation of the latter. Where there are many echoes of Hellenistic moral philosophy in his presentation, the topical profile of the work and the language the (...)
     
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  27.  7
    Patrick J. Coby (2009). Thomas Cromwell: Machiavellian Statecraft and the English Reformation. Lexington Books.
    Thomas Cromwell, chief architect of the English Reformation, served as minister of Henry VIII from 1531 to 1540, the period during which more political and religious reform was accomplished than at any other time in Henry's thirty-seven-year reign. This biography_the first in a generation and the only one now in print_looks at his work and achievements during this period, and includes earlier and more critical assessments that view Cromwell as a disciple of Machiavelli.
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  28. à la Veille de la Réformation (2005). F. Rapp,^ Eucharistie À la Veille de la Réformation 5. Revue D'Histoire Et de Philosophie Religieuses 85:5.
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  29. R. Ward Holder (2009). A Companion to Paul in the Reformation. Brill.
    The reception and interpretation of the writings of St Paul in the early modern period forms the subject of this volume. Written by experts in the field, the articles offer a critical overview of current research, and introduce the major themes in Pauline interpretation in the Reformation.
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  30.  0
    Johan Huizinga (1984). Xvi. First Years of the Reformation. In Erasmus and the Age of Reformation. Princeton University Press 139-150.
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  31. Terence Irwin (2007). The Development of Ethics: Volume 1: From Socrates to the Reformation. Clarendon Press.
    Terence Irwin presents a historical and critical study of the development of moral philosophy over two thousand years, from ancient Greece to the Reformation. Starting with the seminal ideas of Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle, he guides the reader through the centuries that follow, introducing each of the thinkers he discusses with generous quotations from their works. He offers not only careful interpretation but critical evaluation of what they have to offer philosophically. This is the first of three volumes which (...)
     
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  32.  0
    John Morgan (2009). Religious Conventions and Science in the Early Restoration: Reformation and ‘Israel’ in Thomas Sprat's History of the Royal Society. British Journal for the History of Science 42 (3):321-344.
    Sprat situated his analysis of the Royal Society within an emerging Anglican Royalist narrative of the longue durée of post-Reformation England. A closer examination of Sprat's own religious views reveals that his principal interest in the History of the Royal Society, as in the closely related reply to Samuel de Sorbière, the Observations, was to appropriate the advantages and benefits of the Royal Society as support for a re-established, anti-Calvinist Church of England. Sprat connected the two through a reformulation (...)
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  33.  0
    James Arne Nestingen (1992). Challenges and Responses in the Reformation. Interpretation 46 (3):250-260.
    Discernible in the fierce struggles attending the Reformation is the manner in which the Reformers and three great ecclesiastical movements—Lutheranism, Calvinism, and Catholicism—responded to the religious, moral, and political challenges of the age.
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  34. Heiko A. Oberman (1993). The Pursuit of Happiness: Calvin Between Humanism and Reformation. In Charles Edward Trinkaus, John W. O'Malley, Thomas M. Izbicki & Gerald Christianson (eds.), Humanity and Divinity in Renaissance and Reformation: Essays in Honor of Charles Trinkaus. E.J. Brill 251--83.
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  35.  0
    Barbara Sher Tinsley (2001). Pierre Bayle's Reformation: Conscience and Criticism on the Eve of the Enlightenment. Fairleigh Dickinson.
    This work is an historiographical analysis of Bayle's view of the Reformation and the Europeans it affected."--BOOK JACKET.
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  36.  0
    Manuel Tizziani (2014). Nothing to fear from this thought Montaigne, pyrrhonism, and reformation. Ideas Y Valores 63 (156):207-221.
    M. de Montaigne fue simultáneamente hijo del Renacimiento y de la Reforma, y un lúcido seguidor de Sexto Empírico. Se muestra cómo el pirronismo lo condujo a cuestionar las convicciones de su tiempo y a atenerse a las costumbres y leyes vigentes. Esto le dio pie a una posición política moderada, así como a una adhesión no dogmática al catolicismo. Se analiza su original posición frente a la Reforma, bajo la hipótesis de que su postura político-religiosa solo cabe entenderla a (...)
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  37.  3
    Stefania Tutino (2014). Shadows of Doubt: Language and Truth in Post-Reformation Catholic Culture. OUP Usa.
    Stefania Tutino shows that post-Reformation Catholic culture was a rich laboratory for our current moral and hermeneutical anxieties.
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  38.  51
    S. Amsterdamski (1975). The Evolution of Science: Reformation and Counter-Reformation. Diogenes 23 (89):21-43.
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  39.  3
    David C. Steinmetz (1989). The Reformation and the Ten Commandments. Interpretation 43 (3):256-266.
    Disagreement in the sixteenth century on the meaning of the First Commandment prompted dissension over such related issues as the nature of the Lord's Supper, the authority of the Old Testament for the church and the pace of ecclesiastical reform—issues that are still in dispute.
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  40.  6
    Richard J. Mouw (1985). Alasdair MacIntyre on Reformation Ethics. Journal of Religious Ethics 13 (2):243 - 257.
    In his impressive account of the development of the modern conception of selfhood, Alasdair MacIntyre argues that the Protestant Reformers played an important role in paving the way for secular ethics. This essay challenges MacIntyre's historical narrative on this point. His treatment of the views of Luther and Calvin is critically examined, and it is argued that the Reformational view-point offers an alternative to both the classical-medievalist perspective, which Maclntyre endorses, and the modern conception, which he rejects. (...)
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  41.  88
    G. Sasso (1955). Book Reviews : Renaissance to Reformation: A Critical Review of the Spiritual and Temporal Influence on Medieval Europe by Albert Hyma (Grand Rapids, Mich.: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing Company, 1951.) Pp. 591. [REVIEW] Diogenes 3 (9):124-127.
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  42. Mark Ridley (1986). Evolution and Classification: The Reformation of Cladism. Longman.
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  43. J. Milbank (1991). Book Review : Die Ethik des Protestantismus von der Reformation Bis Zur Gegenwart, by Christofer Frey, Gutersloh, Gerd Mohn, 1989. 287 Pp. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 4 (1):108-111.
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  44.  5
    J. -J. Gavigan (1964). Die Reformation in Deutschland. Augustinianum 4 (3):575-576.
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  45.  5
    J. -J. Gavigan (1969). Geist Und Geschichte der Reformation. Augustinianum 9 (2):413-414.
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  46.  5
    Bernerd C. Weber (1966). The Reformation. Augustinianum 6 (2):361-362.
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  47.  4
    D. B. Zema (1943). The Reformation in England. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 18 (3):519-520.
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  48.  31
    Branko Mitrović (2009). Defending Alexander of Aphrodisias in the Age of the Counter-Reformation: Iacopo Zabarella on the Mortality of the Soul According to Aristotle. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 91 (3):330-354.
    The work of the Paduan Aristotelian philosopher Iacopo Zabarella (1533–1589) has attracted the attention of historians of philosophy mainly for his contributions to logic, scientific methodology and because of his possible influence on Galileo. At the same time, Zabarella's views on Aristotelian psychology have been little studied so far; even those historians of Renaissance philosophy who have discussed them, have based their analysis mainly on the psychological essays included in Zabarella's De rebus naturalibus , but have avoided Zabarella's commentary on (...)
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  49.  80
    Robert Keith Shaw (2011). The Reformation of Business Education: Purposes and Objectives. In Proceedings of 2011 Conference of the New Zealand Assoication of Applied Business Education. Nelson, New Zealand, 11 October 2011. New Zealand Association of Applied Business Education
    Business education is at a critical juncture. How are we to justify the curriculum in undergraduate business awards in Aotearoa New Zealand? This essay suggests a philosophical framework for the analysis the business curriculum in Western countries. This framework helps us to see curriculum in a context of global academic communities and national needs. It situates the business degree in the essential tension which modernity (Western metaphysics) creates and which is expressed in an increasingly globalised economy. The tension is between (...)
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  50.  5
    Thomas F. Gilligan (1962). Toleration and the Reformation. Augustinianum 2 (2):373-375.
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