Search results for 'Regan Becker' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anita Allen, Lawrence C. Becker, Deryck Beyleveld, David Cummiskey, David DeGrazia, David M. Gallagher, Alan Gewirth, Virginia Held, Barbara Koziak, Donald Regan, Jeffrey Reiman, Henry Richardson, Beth J. Singer, Michael Slote, Edward Spence & James P. Sterba (1998). Gewirth: Critical Essays on Action, Rationality, and Community. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 1200.0
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  2. Regan Becker, Paul Lester & Sherry Baker (2003). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (1):68 – 78.score: 120.0
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  3. Peter Becker & William Clark (eds.) (2001). Little Tools of Knowledge: Historical Essays on Academic and Bureaucratic Practices. University of Michigan Press.score: 60.0
    This volume brings historians of science and social historians together to consider the role of "little tools"--such as tables, reports, questionnaires, dossiers, index cards--in establishing academic and bureaucratic claims to authority and objectivity. From at least the eighteenth century onward, our science and society have been planned, surveyed, examined, and judged according to particular techniques of collecting and storing knowledge. Recently, the seemingly self-evident nature of these mundane epistemic and administrative tools, as well as the prose in which they are (...)
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  4. Gary Becker, Nber Working Paper Series.score: 60.0
    © 2004 by Gary S. Becker, Kevin M. Murphy, and Michael Grossman. All rights reserved. Short sections of text, not to exceed two paragraphs, may be quoted without explicit permission provided that full credit, including © notice, is given to the source.
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  5. Tom Regan (2009). The Case for Animal Rights. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Ethics: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    More than twenty years after its original publication, The Case for Animal Rights is an acknowledged classic of moral philosophy, and its author is recognized as the intellectual leader of the animal rights movement. In a new and fully considered preface, Regan responds to his critics and defends the book's revolutionary position.
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  6. Lawrence C. Becker (1973). On Justifying Moral Judgments. New York,Humanities Press.score: 60.0
    Much discussion of morality presupposes that moral judgments are always, at bottom, arbitrary. Moral scepticism, or at least moral relativism, has become common currency among the liberally educated. This remains the case even while political crises become intractable, and it is increasingly apparent that the scope of public policy formulated with no reference to moral justification is extremely limited. The thesis of On Justifying Moral Judgments insists, on the contrary, that rigorous justifications are possible for moral judgments. Crucially, Becker (...)
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  7. Riachard J. Regan (2009). Compendium of Theology By Thomas Aquinas. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    Towards the end of his life, St. Thomas Aquinas produced a brief, non-technical work summarizing some of the main points of his massive Summa Theologiae. This 'compendium' was intended as an introductory handbook for students and scholars who might not have access to the larger work. It remains the best concise introduction to Aquinas's thought. Furthermore, it is extremely interesting to scholars because it represents Aquinas's last word on these topics. Aquinas does not break new ground or re-think earlier positions (...)
     
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  8. Richard J. Regan (1986). The Moral Dimensions of Politics. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This book explores the moral dimensions of public policy from an Aristotelian-Thomistic perspective. Regan begins with a thorough exposition of natural law theory and proposes ways in which ethical conclusions can be drawn from it. He then goes on to link natural law theory to an analysis of particular areas of public policy as diverse as public morals, social justice, and the morality of warfare.
     
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  9. Tom Regan (1980). Utilitarianism, Vegetarianism, and Animal Rights. Philosophy and Public Affairs 9 (4):305-324.score: 30.0
  10. Carl B. Becker (1990). Buddhist Views of Suicide and Euthanasia. Philosophy East and West 40 (4):543-556.score: 30.0
  11. Tom Regan (1997). The Rights of Humans and Other Animals. Ethics and Behavior 7 (2):103 – 111.score: 30.0
    Human moral rights place justified limits on what people are free to do to one another. Animals also have moral rights, and arguments to support the use of animals in scientific research based on the benefits allegedly derived from animal model research are thus invalid. Animals do not belong in laboratories because placing them there, in the hope of benefits for others, violates their rights.
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  12. Kelly Becker (2008). Epistemic Luck and the Generality Problem. Philosophical Studies 139 (3):353 - 366.score: 30.0
    Epistemic luck has been the focus of much discussion recently. Perhaps the most general knowledge-precluding type is veritic luck, where a belief is true but might easily have been false. Veritic luck has two sources, and so eliminating it requires two distinct conditions for a theory of knowledge. I argue that, when one sets out those conditions properly, a solution to the generality problem for reliabilism emerges.
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  13. Kelly Becker (2009). Margins for Error and Sensitivity: What Nozick Might Have Said. [REVIEW] Acta Analytica 24 (1):17-31.score: 30.0
    Timothy Williamson has provided damaging counterexamples to Robert Nozick’s sensitivity principle. The examples are based on Williamson’s anti-luminosity arguments, and they show how knowledge requires a margin for error that appears to be incompatible with sensitivity. I explain how Nozick can rescue sensitivity from Williamson’s counterexamples by appeal to a specific conception of the methods by which an agent forms a belief. I also defend the proposed conception of methods against Williamson’s criticisms.
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  14. Lawrence C. Becker (2005). Reciprocity, Justice, and Disability. Ethics 116 (1):9-39.score: 30.0
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  15. K. Becker (2001). Understanding Quine's Famous `Statement'. Erkenntnis 55 (1):73-84.score: 30.0
    I argue that Quine''s famous claim, any statement can be held true come what may, demands an interpretation that implies that the meanings of the expressions in the held-true statement change. The intended interpretation of this claim is not clear from its context, and so it is often misunderstood by philosophers (and is misleadingly taught to their students). I explain Fodor and Lepore''s (1992) view that the above interpretation would render Quine''s assertion entirely trivial and reply, on both textual and (...)
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  16. Kelly Becker (2009). Contrastivism and Lucky Questions. Philosophia 37 (2):245-260.score: 30.0
    There’s something deeply right in the idea that knowledge requires an ability to discriminate truth from falsity. Failing to incorporate some version of the discrimination requirement into one’s epistemology generates cases of putative knowledge that are at best problematic. On the other hand, many theories that include a discrimination requirement thereby appear to entail violations of closure. This prima facie tension is resolved nicely in Jonathan Schaffer’s contrastivism, which I describe herein. The contrastivist take on relevant alternatives is implausible, however, (...)
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  17. Tom Regan (1977). Frey on Interests and Animal Rights. Philosophical Quarterly 27 (109):335-337.score: 30.0
  18. K. Becker (1998). On the Perfectly General Nature of Instability in Meaning Holism. Journal of Philosophy 95 (12):635-640.score: 30.0
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  19. Lon Becker (2010). The Missing Shade of Blue as a Proof Against Proof. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (1):35-44.score: 30.0
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  20. Lawrence C. Becker, Virtue, Health, and Eudaimonistic Psychology.score: 30.0
    This unpublished paper from 2004 argues that the agenda for positive psychology laid out by Christopher Peterson and Martin Seligman in their massive work Character Strengths and Virtues: a Handbook and Classification (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004) might be improved by making several conceptual changes: 1) by developing general concepts of virtue (singular), and of positive health to clarify the relationships between specific virtues and competing conceptions of positive health; 2) by aligning the project more firmly with eudaimonistic accounts (...)
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  21. Lawrence C. Becker (1996). Trust as Noncognitive Security About Motives. Ethics 107 (1):43-61.score: 30.0
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  22. Ernest Becker (1973). The Denial of Death. New York,Free Press.score: 30.0
    Drawing from religion and the human sciences, particularly psychology after Freud, the author attempts to demonstrate that the fear of death is man's central ...
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  23. Joseph Becker (1993). The Essential Nature of the Method of the Natural Sciences: Response to A. T. Nuyen's "Truth, Method, and Objectivity: Husserl and Gadamer on Scientific Method&Quot;. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 23 (1):73-76.score: 30.0
  24. Tom Regan (1975). The Moral Basis of Vegetarianism. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):181 - 214.score: 30.0
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  25. Lawrence C. Becker (1972). Foreknowledge and Predestination. Mind 81 (321):138-141.score: 30.0
  26. Tom Regan (1980). Animal Rights, Human Wrongs. Environmental Ethics 2 (2):99-120.score: 30.0
    In this essay, I explore the moral foundations of the treatment of animals. Alternative views are critically examined, including (a) the Kantian account, which holds that our duties regarding animals are actually indirect duties to humanity; (b) the cruelty account, which holds that the idea of cruelty explains why it is wrong to treat animals in certain ways; and (c) the utilitarian account, which holds that the value of consequences for all sentient creatures explains our duties to animals. These views (...)
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  27. Gary Becker, Evolutionary Efficiency and Happiness.score: 30.0
    We model happiness as a measurement tool used to rank alternative actions. Evolution favors a happiness function that measures the individual’s success in relative terms. The optimal function, in particular, is based on a time-varying reference point –or performance benchmark –that is updated over time in a statistically optimal way in order to match the individual’s potential. Habits and peer comparisons arise as special cases of such updating process. This updating also results in a volatile level of happiness that continuously (...)
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  28. Joe Becker (2008). Conceptualizing Mind and Consciousness: Using Constructivist Ideas to Transcend the Physical Bind. Human Development 51 (3):165-189.score: 30.0
    Philosophers and scientists seeking to conceptualize consciousness, and subjective experience in particular, have focused on sensation and perception, and have emphasized binding – how a percept holds together. Building on a constructivist approach to conception centered on separistic-holistic complexes incorporating multiple levels of abstraction, the present approach reconceptualizes binding and opens a new path to theorizing the emergence of consciousness. It is proposed that all subjective experience involves multiple levels of abstraction, a central feature of conception. This modifies the prevalent (...)
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  29. Carol S. Becker (1987). Friendship Between Women: A Phenomenological Study of Best Friends. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 18 (1):59-72.score: 30.0
  30. Lawrence C. Becker (1973). Analogy in Legal Reasoning. Ethics 83 (3):248-255.score: 30.0
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  31. Donald H. Regan (2003). How to Be a Moorean. Ethics 113 (3):651-677.score: 30.0
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  32. Tom Regan (1995). Obligations to Animals Are Based on Rights. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (2):171-180.score: 30.0
    Some feminist philosophers criticize the idea of human rights because, they allege, it encapsulates male bias; it is therefore misguided, in their view, to extend moral rights to non-human animals. I argue that the feminist criticism is misguided. Ideas are not biased in favour of men simply because they originate with men, nor are ideas themselves biased in favour of men because men have used them prejudicially. As for the position that women should abandon theories of rights and embrace an (...)
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  33. Lawrence C. Becker (1972). Axiology, Deontology, and Agent Morality: The Need for Coordination. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 6 (3):213-220.score: 30.0
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  34. David J. Fritzsche & Helmut Becker (1983). Ethical Behavior of Marketing Managers. Journal of Business Ethics 2 (4):291 - 299.score: 30.0
    The ethical behavior of marketing managers was examined by analyzing their responses to a series of different types of ethical dilemmas presented in vignette form. The ethical dilemmas addressed dealt with the issues of (1) coercion and control, (2) conflict of interest, (3) the physical environment, (4) paternalism, and (5) personal integrity. Responses were analyzed to discover whether managers' behavior varied by type of issue faced or whether there is some continuity to ethical behavior which transcends the type of ethical (...)
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  35. Kelly Becker (2012). Basic Knowledge and Easy Understanding. Acta Analytica 27 (2):145-161.score: 30.0
    Reliabilism is a theory that countenances basic knowledge, that is, knowledge from a reliable source, without requiring that the agent knows the source is reliable. Critics (especially Cohen 2002 ) have argued that such theories generate all-too-easy, intuitively implausible cases of higher-order knowledge based on inference from basic knowledge. For present purposes, the criticism might be recast as claiming that reliabilism implausibly generates cases of understanding from brute, basic knowledge. I argue that the easy knowledge (or easy understanding) criticism rests (...)
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  36. Lawrence C. Becker (1974). Criminal Attempt and the Theory of the Law of Crimes. Philosophy and Public Affairs 3 (3):262-294.score: 30.0
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  37. Donald H. Regan (2002). The Value of Rational Nature. Ethics 112 (2):267-291.score: 30.0
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  38. Tom Regan (1979). An Examination and Defense of One Argument Concerning Animal Rights. Inquiry 22 (1-4):189 – 219.score: 30.0
    An argument is examined and defended for extending basic moral rights to animals which assumes that humans, including infants and the severely mentally enfeebled, have such rights. It is claimed that this argument proceeds on two fronts, one critical, where proposed criteria of right-possession are rejected, the other constructive, where proposed criteria are examined with a view to determining the most reasonable one. This form of argument is defended against the charge that it is self-defeating, various candidates for the title, (...)
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  39. L. Becker (2001). The Quantum Mechanics of Minds and Worlds. Philosophical Review 110 (3):482-484.score: 30.0
  40. Kelly Becker (2013). Why Reliabilism Does Not Permit Easy Knowledge. Synthese 190 (17):3751-3775.score: 30.0
    Reliabilism furnishes an account of basic knowledge that circumvents the problem of the given. However, reliabilism and other epistemological theories that countenance basic knowledge have been criticized for permitting all-too-easy higher-level knowledge. In this paper, I describe the problem of easy knowledge, look briefly at proposed solutions, and then develop my own. I argue that the easy knowledge problem, as it applies to reliabilism, hinges on a false and too crude understanding of ‘reliable’. With a more plausible conception of ‘reliable’, (...)
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  41. Tom Regan (1981). The Nature and Possibility of an Environmental Ethic. Environmental Ethics 3 (1):19-34.score: 30.0
    A conception of an environmental ethic is set forth which involves postulating that nonconscious natural objects can have value in their own right, independently of human interests. Two kinds of objection are considered: (1) those that deny the possibility (the intelligibility) of developing an ethic ofthe environment that accepts this postulate, and (2) those.that deny the necessity of constructing such an ethic. Both types of objection are found wanting. The essay condudes with some tentative remarks regarding the notion of inherent (...)
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  42. Lawrence C. Becker (1987). Book Review:Causation in the Law. H. L. A. Hart, Tony Honore. [REVIEW] Ethics 97 (3):664-.score: 30.0
  43. Gary Becker, Status, Lotteries and Inequality¤.score: 30.0
    For several centuries, economists, sociologists, and philosophers have been concerned with the magnitude and e¤ects of inequality. Economists have concentrated on inequality in income and wealth, and have linked this inequality to social welfare, aggregate savings and investment, economic development, and other issues. They have explained the observed degree of inequality by the e¤ect of random shocks, inherited position, and inequality..
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  44. Tom Regan (1978). Fox's Critique of Animal Liberation. Ethics 88 (2):126-133.score: 30.0
    I contest michael fox's criticisms of my position regarding animal rights and our duties to animals on the grounds that he either misunderstands what my position is or, When it is understood, Raises objections that can be met. I also challenge the adequacy of fox's own account of the criteria of possessing basic moral rights.
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  45. Lawrence C. Becker (2003). Human Health and Stoic Moral Norms. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (2):221 – 238.score: 30.0
    For the philosophy of medicine, there are two things of interest about the stoic account of moral norms, quite apart from whether the rest of stoic ethical theory is compelling. One is the stoic version of naturalism: its account of practical reasoning, its solution to the is/ought problem, and its contention that norms for creating, sustaining, or restoring human health are tantamount to moral norms. The other is the stoic account of human agency: its description of the intimate connections between (...)
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  46. Kelly Becker (2006). Is Counterfactual Reliabilism Compatible with Higher-Level Knowledge? Dialectica 60 (1):79–84.score: 30.0
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  47. Lawrence C. Becker (1975). Human Being: The Boundaries of the Concept. Philosophy and Public Affairs 4 (4):334-359.score: 30.0
  48. Lawrence C. Becker (1992). Good Lives: Prolegomena. Social Philosophy and Policy 9 (02):15-.score: 30.0
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  49. Lawrence C. Becker (1976). The Labor Theory of Property Acquisition. Journal of Philosophy 73 (18):653-664.score: 30.0
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  50. Donald H. Regan (1986). Law's Halo. Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (01):15-.score: 30.0
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