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Profile: Reidar Maliks (University of Oslo)
  1. Reidar Maliks (2013). Kant's Theory of Virtue: The Value of Autocracy. By Anne Margaret Baxley. (Cambridge UP, 2010. Pp. Xvi + 189. Price £61.00 Hb.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (252):616-618.
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  2. Reidar Maliks (2013). Kant, the State, and Revolution. Kantian Review 18 (1):29-47.
    This paper argues that, although no resistance or revolution is permitted in the Kantian state, very tyrannical regimes must not be obeyed because they do not qualify as states. The essay shows how a state ceases to be a state, argues that persons have a moral responsibility to judge about it and defends the compatibility of this with Kantian authority. The reconstructed Kantian view has implications for how we conceive authority and obligation. It calls for a morally demanding definition of (...)
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  3. Reidar Maliks (2012). Justification and Legitimacy. Metaphilosophy 43 (5):714-718.
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  4. Reidar Maliks (2012). Kant and Cosmopolitanism: The Philosophical Ideal of World Citizenship. By Pauline Kleingeld. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012. Pp. 232. [REVIEW] Metaphilosophy 43 (5):714-718.
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  5. Reidar Maliks (2012). Revolutionary Epigones: Kant and His Radical Followers. History of Political Thought 33 (4):647-671.
    When Kant in 1793 rejected a right of revolution, he was immediately criticized by a group of radical followers who argued that he had betrayed his own principles of justice. Jakob, Erhard, Fichte, Bergk and Schlegel proceeded to defend a right of resistance and revolution based on what they took to be his true principles. I argue that we must understand Kant's Metaphysics of Morals, which came in 1797, partly as a response to these radical democratic writings. Exploring this forgotten (...)
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  6. Reidar Maliks (2009). Acting Through Others: Kant and the Exercise View of Representation. Public Reason 1 (1):9-26.
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  7. Reidar Maliks (2009). Prussian Polis: Kant's Democratic Republicanism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (4):427-445.
    This article argues that Kant's republicanism provides a foundation for democratic procedures. The conclusion is reached through an investigation of Critique of the Power of Judgment, which allows us to interpret Kant's notion of the state as a self-determining organic community, and not merely an aggregate of individuals. The article rejects Isaiah Berlin's interpretation of Kant as an authoritarian thinker, and reveals a republican theory centered on liberal freedom expressed within a self-organizing political community.
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