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  1. Rein Raud (2012). The Existential Moment: Rereading Dōgen's Theory of Time. Philosophy East and West 62 (2):153-173.
    This article argues for a new way to interpret Dōgen's theory of time, reading the notion of uji as momentary existence, and shows that many notorious difficulties usually associated with the theory can be overcome with this approach, which is also more compatible with some fundamental assumptions of Buddhist philosophy (the non-durational existence of dharmas, the arbitrariness of linguistic designations and the concepts they point to, the absence of self-nature in beings, etc.). It is also shown how this reading leads (...)
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  2. Rein Raud (2011). Inside the Concept: Rethinking Dōgen's Language. Asian Philosophy 21 (2):123 - 137.
    One of the most characteristic features of the philosophy of D?gen is his idiosyncratic use of language, in particular, the replacement of expected semantic connections between two adjacent Chinese characters with improbable, but grammatically possible ones, from which new philosophical concepts are then derived. The article places this writing technique in the context of the linguistic changes that were taking place both in China and Japan at the time of D?gen's writing as well as the general attitude of Chan/Zen thinkers (...)
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  3. Rein Raud (2006). Comment and Discussion. Philosophy East and West 56 (4):618-625.
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  4. Rein Raud (2006). Philosophies Versus Philosophy: In Defense of a Flexible Definition. Philosophy East and West 56 (4):618-625.
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  5. Rein Raud (2006). Traditions and Tendencies: A Reply to Carine Defoort. Philosophy East and West 56 (4):661-664.
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  6. Rein Raud (2004). 'Place' and 'Being-Time': Spatiotemporal Concepts in the Thought of Nishida Kitaro and Dogen Kigen. Philosophy East and West 54 (1):29-51.
    : Presented here is a comparative analysis of spatiotemporal concepts in the thought of Nishida and Dogen, arguing that both thinkers articulate fundamental notions about being and self/subject through them. It starts with an analysis of the notions of 'world' (sekai) and 'place' (basho) as well as time and order in Nishida's work, which is followed by an effort to elucidate his philosophical position by comparing his views to those of Dogen and by demonstrating their similarity in several important aspects, (...)
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  7. Rein Raud (2003). The Genesis of the Logic of Immediacy. Asian Philosophy 13 (2 & 3):131 – 143.
    The article traces the genesis of soku, a particle elevated to the status of an operator of dialectical logic by Japanese philosophers of the Kyto school, to a translation problem that occurred when Buddhist thought spread from India to China. On the basis of the analysis of its most famous locus of occurrence, a passage in the Heart Sutra, it is shown how eva, a Sanskrit particle with the function of distinguishing between logical types of sentences, was transformed into a (...)
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  8. Rein Raud (2002). Objects and Events: Linguistic and Philosophical Notions of 'Thingness'. Asian Philosophy 12 (2):97 – 108.
    The article deals with the differences of the notion of 'object' or 'thing' in natural languages, concluding that some languages are by their structure more object-biased while others are more event-biased and proceeds to analyse how two common Japanese words, mono and koto , both meaning 'thing', have been treated in 20th-century Japanese thought, notably in the philosophical works of Watsuji Tetsurô, Ide Takashi, Hiromatsu Wataru and Kimura Bin. All of these thinkers represent different schools and trends (Watsuji could be (...)
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