Search results for 'Reinhard May' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Reinhard May (1996). Heidegger's Hidden Sources: East Asian Influences on His Work. Routledge.score: 240.0
    While the enormous influence of Martin Heidegger's thought in Japan and China is well documented, the influence on him from East-Asian sources is much lesser known. This remarkable study shows that Heidegger drew some of the major themes of his philosophy--on occasion almost word for word--from German translations of Chinese Daoist and Zen Buddhist classics.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Reinhard May (2001). Schopenhauers global philosophy, insbesondere in seiner Ethik: Zugleich ein neues Stück transeuropäischer Einflussforschung. Schopenhauer-Jahrbuch 82:83-98.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Simon Căbulea May (2013). What We May Demand of Each Other. Analysis 73 (3):554-563.score: 180.0
    In this critical notice of Gerald Gaus's The Order of Public Reason, I reject two arguments Gaus advances for the claim that social moral rules must be publicly justified.
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Robert May, LPS 215 Topics in Analytic Philosophy Spring 2006 R. May.score: 180.0
    The topic of this seminar will be the notion of language as it is employed in the philosophy of language. The seminar will be divided into two parts, of somewhat unequal length. The first part will be devoted to the change in the conception of language that marked the transition from structural linguistics to generative linguistics (the so-called "Chomskian revolution"). We will approach this not only as a chapter in the philosophy of language, but also as an important chapter in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Larry May & Robert Strikwerda (1995). Reply to Victoria Davion's Comments on May and Strikwerda. Hypatia 10 (2):157 - 158.score: 180.0
  6. Jon May (2001). 12 Specifying the Central Executive May Require Complexity. In Jackie Andrade (ed.), Working Memory in Perspective. Psychology Press. 261.score: 180.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Asher Jiang (2013). Humes Moralphilosophie Unter Chinesischem Einfluss by Reinhard May (Review). Philosophy East and West 63 (4):673-676.score: 150.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Asher Jiang (2013). Humes Moralphilosophie Unter Chinesischem Einfluss by Reinhard May. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 63 (4):673-676.score: 150.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ellen M. Chen (2005). How Taoist Is Heidegger? International Philosophical Quarterly 45 (1):5-19.score: 30.0
    There are many strains in Heidegger’s thought to which he often refers, but one that he never mentions, Taoism. Otto Pöggeler has noted that Heidegger’s engagement with Chinese philosophy, and in particular with the Tao Te Ching of Lao-tzu, exerted a decisive effect on the form and direction of his later thinking. With Reinhard May’s careful comparisons of passages from Heidegger’s major texts with translations of the Tao Te Ching and various Zen Buddhist texts, there is now general agreement (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Matthew Lister (2010). Review of May & Hoskins, International Criminal Law and Philosophy. [REVIEW] Concurring Opinions Blog.score: 24.0
    This is a review of an anthology on international criminal law edited by Larry May and Zack Hoskins.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Stewart Duncan, Comments on Larry May, Limiting Leviathan.score: 24.0
    Draft for a forthcoming special section of Hobbes Studies on May's book. -/- This paper discusses two aspects of Larry May's book Limiting Leviathan. First it discusses a passage in Leviathan, to which May draws attention, in which Hobbes connects obligation to "that, which in the disputations of scholars is called absurdity". Secondly it looks at the book's discussion of Hobbes and pacifist attitudes, with reference to Hobbes's contemporary critic John Eachard.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Robert E. Goodin & Christian List (2006). A Conditional Defense of Plurality Rule: Generalizing May's Theorem in a Restricted Informational Environment. American Journal of Political Science 50 (4):940-949.score: 24.0
    May's theorem famously shows that, in social decisions between two options, simple majority rule uniquely satisfies four appealing conditions. Although this result is often cited in support of majority rule, it has never been extended beyond decisions based on pairwise comparisons of options. We generalize May's theorem to many-option decisions where voters each cast one vote. Surprisingly, plurality rule uniquely satisfies May's conditions. This suggests a conditional defense of plurality rule: If a society's balloting procedure collects only a single vote (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Steven L. Davis (2003). The Least Harm Principle May Require That Humans Consume a Diet Containing Large Herbivores, Not a Vegan Diet. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (4):387-394.score: 18.0
    Based on his theory of animalrights, Regan concludes that humans are morallyobligated to consume a vegetarian or vegandiet. When it was pointed out to him that evena vegan diet results in the loss of manyanimals of the field, he said that while thatmay be true, we are still obligated to consumea vegetarian/vegan diet because in total itwould cause the least harm to animals (LeastHarm Principle, or LHP) as compared to currentagriculture. But is that conclusion valid? Isit possible that some other (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Mehmet Elgin (2006). There May Be Strict Empirical Laws in Biology, After All. Biology and Philosophy 21 (1):119-134.score: 18.0
    This paper consists of four parts. Part 1 is an introduction. Part 2 evaluates arguments for the claim that there are no strict empirical laws in biology. I argue that there are two types of arguments for this claim and they are as follows: (1) Biological properties are multiply realized and they require complex processes. For this reason, it is almost impossible to formulate strict empirical laws in biology. (2) Generalizations in biology hold contingently but laws go beyond describing contingencies, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Joshua Rasmussen (2012). Presentists May Say Goodbye to A-Properties. Analysis 72 (2):270-276.score: 18.0
    Philosophers of time say that if presentism is true (i.e. if reality is comprised solely of presently existing things), then a complete description of reality must contain tensed terms, such as ‘was’, ‘presently is’ and ‘will be’. I counter this viewpoint by explaining how the presentist may de-tense our talk about times. I argue, furthermore, that, since the A-theory of time denies the success of any such de-tensing strategy, presentism is not a version of the A-theory – contrary to the (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. David Hershenov (2009). Why Consent May Not Be Needed for Organ Procurement. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (8):3 - 10.score: 18.0
    It is widely and firmly held that it is ethically impermissible to take organs from the dead if they earlier expressed a wish not to be a donor. We share that intuition and feel a visceral distaste towards the taking of organs without permission. Yet we respond quite differently to a thought experiment that seems analogous in the morally relevant ways to taking organs without consent. This thought experiment elicits from us (and most others) the belief that we can justifiably (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ruth Barcan Marcus (2011). C. I. Lewis on Intensional Predicate Logic: A Letter Dated May 11, 1960. History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (2):103 - 106.score: 18.0
    History and Philosophy of Logic, Volume 32, Issue 2, Page 103-106, May 2011.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Bill Wringe (forthcoming). May I Treat A Collective As A Mere Means. American Philosophical Quarterly.score: 18.0
    According to Kant, it is impermissible to treat humanity as a mere means. If we accept Kant's equation of humanity with rational agency, and are literalists about ascriptions of agency to collectives it appears to follow that we may not treat collectives as mere means. On most standard accounts of what it is to treat something as a means this conclusion seems highly implausible. I conclude that we are faced with a range of options. One would be to rethink the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Arne Naess, "Arne Naess Between Reason and Emotion." (This Paper Was the Basis for Lectures Held at the Universities of Prague, Vienna and Belgrade, May 2003).score: 18.0
    I try to convince the reader that we all too often consider our decisions more or less unreasonable – and due to emotions overpowering reason. The dualism: reason/emotion may be dangerously misleading. Psychoanalysis may be said to have been the first systematic effort to help us find the real reasons for our important decisions and views. Personal maturity involves both strength of emotions and clearness of thinking.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. John Bishop (2007). How a Modest Fideism May Constrain Theistic Commitments: Exploring an Alternative to Classical Theism. Philosophia 35 (3-4):387-402.score: 18.0
    On the assumption that theistic religious commitment takes place in the face of evidential ambiguity, the question arises under what conditions it is permissible to make a doxastic venture beyond one’s evidence in favour of a religious proposition. In this paper I explore the implications for orthodox theistic commitment of adopting, in answer to that question, a modest, moral coherentist, fideism. This extended Jamesian fideism crucially requires positive ethical evaluation of both the motivation and content of religious doxastic ventures. I (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Lauge Baungaard Rasmussen (2005). The Narrative Aspect of Scenario Building - How Story Telling May Give People a Memory of the Future. AI and Society 19 (3):229-249.score: 18.0
    Scenarios are flexible means to integrate disparate ideas, thoughts and feelings into holistic images, providing the context and meaning of possible futures. The application of narrative scenarios in engineering, development of socio-technical systems or communities provides an important link between general ideas and specification of technical system requirements. They focus on how people use systems through context-related storytelling rather than abstract descriptions of requirements. The quality of scenarios depends on relevant assumptions and authentic scenario stories. In this article, we will (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Paul W. Allen & Chee K. Ng (2001). Self Interest Among CPAs May Influence Their Moral Reasoning. Journal of Business Ethics 33 (1):29 - 35.score: 18.0
    In 1990, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued a consent order to the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA). The order decreed the AICPA to lessen its longstanding ethics code which had until then banned the receipts of commissions, referral fees and contingent fees. The FTC alleged that the AICPA banned receipt of the fees as an attempt to restrain trade (FTC, 1990).In the present study, we sought to determine if CPAs'' preference for bans on commissions, referral fees and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. George Ainslie (2006). Cruelty May Be a Self-Control Device Against Sympathy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (3):224-225.score: 18.0
    Dispassionate cruelty and the euphoria of hunting or battle should be distinguished from the emotional savoring of victims' suffering. Such savoring, best called negative empathy, is what puzzles motivational theory. Hyperbolic discounting theory suggests that sympathy with people who have unwanted but seductive traits creates a threat to self-control. Cruelty to those people may often be the least effortful way of countering this threat.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Matthew Lister (2012). There is No Human Right to Democracy. But May We Promote It Anyway? Stanford Journal of International Law 48 (2):257.score: 18.0
    The idea of “promoting democracy” is one that goes in and out of favor. With the advent of the so-called “Arab Spring”, the idea of promoting democracy abroad has come up for discussion once again. Yet an important recent line of thinking about human rights, starting with John Rawls’s book The Law of Peoples, has held that there is no human right to democracy, and that nondemocratic states that respect human rights should be “beyond reproach” in the realm of international (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. H. Magnusson, L. Fellander-Tsai, M. G. Hansson & L. Ryd (2011). Cancellations of Elective Surgery May Cause an Inferior Postoperative Course: The 'Invisible Hand' of Health-Care Prioritization? Clinical Ethics 6 (1):27-31.score: 18.0
    Elective surgery can be cancelled when resources are overwhelmed by emergency cases. We hypothesized that such cancellations, on psychological grounds, are followed also by inferior clinical results and we conducted a retrospective survey of patients following joint replacement surgery. Sixty patients having suffered from administrative cancellation prior to their operation during an 18-month period and with six months follow-up were identified and compared with another 60 matched patients after having the same type of surgery but without prior cancellation. All patients (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Nicholas Shea (2013). Perception Versus Action: The Computations May Be the Same but the Direction of Fit Differs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (3):228-229.score: 18.0
    Although predictive coding may offer a computational principle that unifies perception and action, states with different directions of fit are involved (with indicative and imperative contents, respectively). Predictive states are adjusted to fit the world in the course of perception, but in the case of action, the corresponding states act as a fixed target towards which the agent adjusts the world. This well-recognised distinction helps side-step some problems discussed in the target article.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Alik Pelman (2014). Theoretical Identities May Not Be Necessary. Analysis 74 (3):412-422.score: 18.0
    Following insights from the New Theory of Reference, it has become widely accepted that theoretical identities like ‘water = H2O' are necessary. However, some have challenged this claim. I propose yet another challenge in the form of a sceptical argument. The argument is based on the contention that the necessity of theoretical identities is dependent upon criteria of identity. Thus, a theoretical identity is necessary given one criterion of identity but contingent given another. Since we do not know which criteria (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Felipe De Brigard & William Brady (2013). The Effect of What We Think May Happen on Our Judgments of Responsibility. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (2):259-269.score: 18.0
    Recent evidence suggests that if a deterministic description of the events leading up to a morally questionable action is couched in mechanistic, reductionistic, concrete and/or emotionally salient terms, people are more inclined toward compatibilism than when those descriptions use non-mechanistic, non-reductionistic, abstract and/or emotionally neutral terms. To explain these results, it has been suggested that descriptions of the first kind are processed by a concrete cognitive system, while those of the second kind are processed by an abstract cognitive system. The (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Tony Charman (2001). Understanding the Imitation Deficit in Autism May Lead to a More Specific Model of Autism as an Empathy Disorder. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):29-30.score: 18.0
    Preston & de Waal are understandably cautious in applying their model to autism. They emphasise multiple cognitive impairments in autism, including prefrontal-executive, cerebellar-attention, and amygdala-emotion recognition deficits. Further empirical examination of imitation ability in autism may reveal deficits in the neural and cognitive basis of perception-action mapping that have a specific relation to the empathic deficit.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Aribert Rothenberger & Roumen Kirov (2005). Changes in Sleep-Wake Behavior May Be More Than Just an Epiphenomenon of ADHD. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):439-439.score: 18.0
    Sleep disturbances are common for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and are of great clinical significance. Brain dopamine plays an important role for both ADHD symptoms and sleep-wake regulation. We therefore suggest that one basic aspect of integrative brain-behavior relationship such as the sleep-wake cycle may certainly be addressed in a dynamic developmental theory of ADHD.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Jaak Panksepp (1999). The Affiliative Playfulness and Impulsivity of Extraverts May Not Be Dopaminergically Mediated. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):533-534.score: 18.0
    A major dopaminergic role for extraversion is compromised by the fact that affiliation and impulsivity tend to be reduced by psychostimulants. Also, the large clinical literature on the treatment of ADHD with drugs that promote dopamine activity provides little or no support for a major role for dopamine in human extraversion. Dopamine facilitation of agency may be more evident for inanimate rather than animate rewards.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. J. Baird Callicott (1996). How Environmental Ethical Theory May Be Put Into Practice. Ethics and the Environment 1 (1):3 - 14.score: 18.0
    Environmentalists do not appear to walk their walk as consistently as animal liberationists and anti-abortionists. Are we therefore more hypocritical? Maybe; but there's another explanation. Unlike concern for individual animals or individual fetuses, environmental concerns are holistic (systemic)—air and waterpollution, species <span class='Hi'>extinction</span>, diminished ecological health and integrity. One pro-life pregnant woman may preserve the life of one unborn baby, the one in her uterus; and one animal liberationist can save the life of one animal, the one he didn't eat. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Robert Kinscherff (2010). Proposition: A Personality Disorder May Nullify Responsibility for a Criminal Act. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (4):745-759.score: 18.0
    This article argues in support of the proposition that “A Personality Disorder May Nullify Responsibility for a Criminal Act.” Building upon research in categorical and dimensional controversies in diagnosis, neurocognitive science and the behavioral genetics of mental disorders, and difficulties in differential diagnosis and co-morbidity with personality disorders, this article holds that a per se rule barring personality diagnosis as a basis for a defense of legal insanity is scientifically and conceptually indefensible. Rather, focus should be upon the severity and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. J. Perry (2011). May Alzheimer's Patients Refuse Tube Feeding? Yet More Questions on the Papal Allocution--And Perhaps an Answer. Christian Bioethics 17 (2):123-139.score: 18.0
    The implications of Pope John Paul II's 2004 Allocution on vegetative states remain unclear despite dozens of articles and a recent clarifying statement from the Vatican. Yet few have considered its implications for those with end-stage progressive dementia, such as Alzheimer's disease. Although recent studies suggest tube feeding is burdensome and not beneficial for such patients, the Allocution would nonetheless seem to forbid patients from forgoing it. But this seems to be in tension with the Catholic bioethical tradition as a (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. David Braun (2013). Invariantism About 'Can' and 'May' (as Well as 'Might'). Linguistics and Philosophy 36 (2):181-185.score: 18.0
    Braun (Linguistics & Philosophy 35, 461–489, 2012) argued for a non- relativist, invariantist theory of ‘might’. Yanovich (Linguistics & Philosophy, 2013) argues that Braun’s theory is inconsistent with certain facts concerning diachronic meaning changes in ‘might’, ‘can’, and ‘may’. This paper replies to Yanovich’s objection.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Pascal Boyer (1998). If “Tracking” is Category-Specific a “Common Structure” May Be Redundant. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):67-68.score: 18.0
    Identifying objects as members of ontological domains activates category-specific processes. There is evidence that these processes include particular ways of “tracking” substances and could do all the “tracking” necessary for concept acquisition. There may be no functional need or evolutionary scenario for a general tracking capacity of the kind described by Millikan.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Thomas H. Rammsayer (1999). Dopamine and Extraversion: Differential Responsivity May Be the Key. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):535-536.score: 18.0
    Depue & Collins's general idea of a functional relationship between DA activity and extraversion is an important step toward an integrative biological model of personality. However, focusing primarily on incentive motivation and variations in VTA DA activity as basic behavioral and biological components underlying extraversion appears too limited. Existing data suggest that responsivity to changes in DA activity is higher in introverts than in extraverts. This may reflect a general, extraversion- related characteristic of the entire dopaminergic network in the brain.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. John Bendix & Randall Collins (1998). Comparison in the Work of Reinhard Bendix. Sociological Theory 16 (3):298-301.score: 18.0
    Discussions of modes of analysis, as well as the received wisdom about which categories to place scholars in, often obscure the breadth and nature of inquiry a particular figure engaged in. This examination of Reinhard Bendix's various uses of comparison suggests that, beyond the sociohistorical comparison he was known for, one should also consider his reflexive works, his work on the role of social science and claims for knowledge, and his reflections on the history of ideas, the need for (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Daniela Corbetta (2003). Right-Handedness May Have Come First: Evidence From Studies in Human Infants and Nonhuman Primates. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):217-218.score: 18.0
    Recent studies with human infants and nonhuman primates reveal that posture interacts with the expression and stability of handedness. Converging results demonstrate that quadrupedal locomotion hinders the expression of handedness, whereas bipedal posture enhances preferred hand use. From an evolutionary perspective, these findings suggest that right-handedness may have emerged first, following the adoption of bipedal locomotion, with speech emerging later.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Yonata Levy (2002). Structural Abnormality May Not Equal Functional Oddity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):760-761.score: 18.0
    This commentary questions the authors’claim that cognitive neuropsychology is defined by modularity and that other theoretical frames, that is, connectionism, are a priori rejected. It also points to the fact that whereas in genetic disorders there are developmental delay and asynchrony, there are few reports of deviant developmental trajectories that are never seen in typical development. It is suggested that the possibility that structure does not equal function in the developing brain, may be a viable option.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. J. Panksepp, J. Burgdorf, N. Gordon & C. Turner (2002). Treatment of ADHD with Methylphenidate May Sensitize Brain Substrates of Desire: Implications for Changes in Drug Abuse Potential From an Animal Model. Consciousness and Emotion 3 (1):7-19.score: 18.0
    Aims. Currently, methylphenidate (MPH, trade name Ritalin) is the most widely prescribed medication for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We examined the ability of repeated MPH administration to produce a sensitized appetitive eagerness type response in laboratory rats, as indexed by 50-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (50-kHz USVs). We also examined the ability of MPH to reduce play behavior in rats which may be partially implicated in the clinical efficacy of MPH in ADHD. Design. 56 adolescent rats received injections of either 5.0 mg/kg (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Thomas R. Scott (2012). Neuroscience May Supersede Ethics and Law. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):433-437.score: 18.0
    Abstract Advances in technology now make it possible to monitor the activity of the human brain in action, however crudely. As this emerging science continues to offer correlations between neural activity and mental functions, mind and brain may eventually prove to be one. If so, such a full comprehension of the electrochemical bases of mind may render current concepts of ethics, law, and even free will irrelevant. Content Type Journal Article Category Original Paper Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s11948-012-9351-1 Authors Thomas R. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Rebecca Erwin Wells & Ted J. Kaptchuk (2012). To Tell the Truth, the Whole Truth, May Do Patients Harm: The Problem of the Nocebo Effect for Informed Consent. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):22-29.score: 18.0
    The principle of informed consent obligates physicians to explain possible side effects when prescribing medications. This disclosure may itself induce adverse effects through expectancy mechanisms known as nocebo effects, contradicting the principle of nonmaleficence. Rigorous research suggests that providing patients with a detailed enumeration of every possible adverse event?especially subjective self-appraised symptoms?can actually increase side effects. Describing one version of what might happen (clinical ?facts?) may actually create outcomes that are different from what would have happened without this information (another (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. James Ricks & John Fraedrich (1999). The Paradox of Machiavellianism: Machiavellianism May Make for Productive Sales but Poor Management Reviews. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 20 (3):197 - 205.score: 18.0
    This article investigates the effects of Machiavellianism (MACH) on sales performance. Results indicate that those who possess high Machiavellian traits are more productive but received lower overall managerial ratings. Findings suggest that Machiavellianism may in certain circumstances, be somewhat advantageous for long-term sales performance.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Andrew N. Iwaniuk & Ian Q. Whishaw (2001). The Spandrel May Be Related to Culture Not Brain Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):288-288.score: 18.0
    Finlay et al. describe a method of examining brain evolution, but it has limits that may hinder extrapolation to all vertebrate taxa or the understanding of how brains work. For example, members of different orders have brain and behavioral organization that are fundamentally different. Future investigations should incorporate a phylogenetic approach and more attention to behavior to further test their conclusions.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Ester I. Klimkeit & John L. Bradshaw (2006). Heritable Mental Disorders: You Can't Choose Your Relatives, but It is They Who May Really Count. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):414-415.score: 18.0
    Keller & Miller (K&M) briefly mention and promptly dismiss the idea that genes for harmful mental disorders may confer certain advantages to affected individuals. However, the authors fail to consider that the same genes (in low doses or reduced penetrance) may be adaptive for relatives, and that this may in part explain why they are retained in the gene pool. (Published Online November 9 2006).
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Stephan Schleim (2008). The Risk That Neurogenetic Approaches May Inflate the Psychiatric Concept of Disease and How to Cope with It. Poiesis and Praxis 6 (1-2):79-91.score: 18.0
    Currently, there is a growing interest in combining genetic information with physiological data measured by functional neuroimaging to investigate the underpinnings of psychiatric disorders. The first part of this paper describes this trend and provides some reflections on its chances and limitations. In the second part, a thought experiment using a commonsense definition of psychiatric disorders is invoked in order to show how information from this kind of research could be used and potentially abused to invent new mental illnesses. It (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Matthew W. Pierce, Suzanne Maman, Allison K. Groves, Elizabeth J. King & Sarah C. Wyckoff (2011). Testing Public Health Ethics: Why the CDC's HIV Screening Recommendations May Violate the Least Infringement Principle. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 39 (2):263-271.score: 18.0
    The CDC's HIV screening recommendations for health care settings advocate abandoning two important autonomy protections: (1) pretest counseling and (2) the requirement that providers obtain affirmative agreement from patients prior to testing. The recommendations may violate the least infringement principle because there is insufficient evidence to conclude that abandoning pretest counseling or affirmative agreement requirements will further the CDC's stated public health goals.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Margaret Wilson (2001). Internalized Constraints May Function as an Emulator. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (4):710-711.score: 18.0
    Kubovy and Epstein's main quarrel is with the concept of “internalization.” I argue that they underestimate the aptness of this metaphor. In particular, an emulator which predicts unfolding events can be described as an internalization of external structures. Further, an emulator may use motoric as well as perceptual resources, which lends support to Hecht's proposal. [Hecht; Kubovy & Epstein].
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Marcus Arvan (forthcoming). Why Hobbes Cannot Limit the Leviathan: A Critical Commentary on Larry May's Limiting Leviathan. Hobbes Studies.score: 18.0
    This commentary contends that Larry May’s Hobbesian argument for limitations on sovereignty and lawmaking in Limiting Leviathan does not succeed. First, I show that Hobbes begins with a plausible instrumental theory of normativity. Second, I show that Hobbes then attempts, unsuccessfully—by his own lights—to defend a kind of non-instrumental, moral normativity. Thus, I contend, in order to successfully “limit the Leviathan” of the state, the Hobbesian must provide a sound instrumental argument in favor of the sovereign limiting their actions and (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000