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  1. Reinhardt Grossmann (1998). Wittgenstein and the Problem of Non-Existent States of Affairs. Acta Analytica 21:139-146.
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  2. Reinhardt Grossmann (1995). Meinong und die Gegenstandstheorie. Grazer Philosophische Studien 50:163-169.
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  3. Reinhardt Grossmann (1995). Thoughts, Objectives and States of Affairs. Grazer Philosophische Studien 50:163-169.
    The notion of state of affairs was introduced as the complexly signifiable in the Late Scholasticism and rediscovered by Logicians like Bolzano and Frege. While Bolzano and Frege were primarily interested in the nature of objective truths students of Brentano, among others Meinong, Twardowski and Husserl, developed similar concepts starting out with an interest in the nature of mental acts and judgement. Both Frege's and Meinong's conceptions face similar problems concerning complex referents which are diagnosed to stem from confusions of (...)
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  4. Reinhardt Grossmann (1993). The Semantic Tradition From Kant to Carnap. International Studies in Philosophy 25 (3):109-111.
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  5. Reinhardt Grossmann (1992). Frege and Other Philosophers. Review of Metaphysics 45 (4):852-854.
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  6. Reinhardt Grossmann (1992). The Existence of the World: An Introduction to Ontology. Routledge.
    The final section of the book considers two features of the world which transcend the categories, existence and negation.
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  7. Reinhardt Grossmann (1991). Frege in Perspective. Review of Metaphysics 45 (1):156-157.
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  8. Reinhardt Grossmann & Michael P. Levine (1986). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Philosophia 16 (3-4):101-109.
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  9. Reinhardt Grossmann (1984). Nonexistent Objects Versus Definite Descriptions. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 62 (4):363 – 377.
  10. Reinhardt Grossmann (1984). Phenomenology and Existentialism: An Introduction. Routledge & K. Paul.
    Professor Grossman’s introduction to the revolutionary work of Husserl, Heidegger and Sartre studies the ideas of their predecessors too, explaining in detail Descartes’s conception of the mind, Brentano’s theory of intentionality, and Kierkegaard’s emphasis on dread, while tracing the debate over existence and essence as far back as Aquinas and Aristotle. For a full understanding of the existentialists and phenomenologists, we must also understand the problems that they were trying to solve. This book, originally published in 1984, presents clearly how (...)
     
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  11. Reinhardt Grossmann (1977). Some Troubles with Constructional Definitions. Philosophical Books 18 (1):6-9.
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  12. Reinhardt Grossmann (1976). Perception, Common Sense, and Science. International Studies in Philosophy 8:210-213.
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  13. Reinhardt Grossmann (1976). The Factuality of Facts. Grazer Philosophische Studien 2:85-103.
    It is argued that, while there is no such property as truth, there is a feature of factuality which certain states of affairs have and others lack. Since states of affairs can appear before the mind as having this feature when, in reality, they do not have it, a most difficult epistemological problem arises, namely, how to distinguish between a state of affairs which merely appears to have factuality and a state of affairs which really is factual. The test for (...)
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  14. Reinhardt Grossmann (1975). Definite Descriptions. Philosophical Studies 27 (2):127 - 144.
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  15. Reinhardt Grossmann (1974/1999). Meinong. Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  16. Reinhardt Grossmann (1974). Meinong's Doctrine of the Aussersein of the Pure Object. Noûs 8 (1):67-82.
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  17. Reinhardt Grossmann (1973). Ontological Reduction. Bloomington,Indiana University Press.
  18. Reinhardt Grossmann (1972). Russell's Paradox and Complex Properties. Noûs 6 (2):153-164.
    The author argues that the primary lesson of the so-Called logical and semantical paradoxes is that certain entities do not exist, Entities of which we mistakenly but firmly believe that they must exist. In particular, Russell's paradox teaches us that there is no such thing as the property which every property has if and only if it does not have itself. Why should anyone think that such a property must exist and, Hence, Conceive of russell's argument as a paradox rather (...)
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  19. Reinhardt Grossmann (1969). Non-Existent Objects: Recent Work on Brentano and Meinong. American Philosophical Quarterly 6 (1):17 - 32.
  20. Reinhardt Grossmann (1969). Reflections on Frege's Philosophy. Evanston, Northwestern University Press.
     
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  21. Reinhardt Grossmann (1962). Brentano's Ontology: A Reply to Mr. Kamitz. Analysis 23 (1):20 - 24.
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  22. Reinhardt Grossmann (1962). Sensory Intuition and the Dogma of Localization. Inquiry 5 (1-4):238 – 251.
    Conceptualism, like any other philosophical doctrine of comparable scope, has both ontological and epistemological aspects. Ontologically, however, conceptualism does not differ significantly from certain forms of nominalism. 1 At its root lies an epistemological thesis: All objects of sensory intuition are localized in space and time. 2 In this paper, I wish to explore some of the consequences of this thesis.
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  23. Reinhardt Grossmann (1961). Frege's Ontology. Philosophical Review 70 (1):23-40.
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  24. Reinhardt Grossmann (1960). Acts and Relations in Brentano. Analysis 21 (1):1 - 5.
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  25. Reinhardt Grossmann (1960). Conceptualism. Review of Metaphysics 14 (2):243 - 254.
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  26. Reinhardt Grossmann (1960). Digby and Berkeley on Notions. Theoria 26 (1):17-30.
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  27. Reinhardt Grossmann (1960). Propositional Attitudes. Philosophical Quarterly 10 (41):301-312.
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  28. Reinhardt Grossmann (1959). Book Review:Semantics and Necessary Turth Arthur Pap. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 26 (1):57-.
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