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Profile: Rekha Nath (University of Alabama)
  1. Rekha Nath (forthcoming). Two Wrong Don't Make a Right: A Critique of Virgina Held's Deontological Justification of Terrorism. Social Theory and Practice.
    Virginia Held argues that terrorism can be justified in some instances. But unlike standard, consequentialist justifications, hers is deontological. This paper critically examines her argument. It explores how the values of fairness, responsibility, and desert can serve to justify acts of terrorism. In doing so, two interpretations of her account are considered: a responsibility-insensitive and a responsibility-sensitive interpretation. On the first, her argument collapses into a consequentialist justification. On the second, it relies on an implausible conception of responsibility. Either way, (...)
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  2. Rekha Nath (2011). Equal Standing in the Global Community. The Monist 94 (4):593-614.
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  3. Rekha Nath (2011). Two Wrongs Don't Make a Right. Social Theory and Practice 37 (4):679-696.
    Virginia Held argues that terrorism can be justified in some instances. But unlike standard, consequentialist justifications, hers is deontological. This paper critically examines her argument. It explores how the values of fairness, responsibility, and desert can serve to justify acts of terrorism. In doing so, two interpretations of her account are considered: a responsibility-insensitive and a responsibility-sensitive interpretation. On the first, her argument collapses into a consequentialist justification. On the second, it relies on an implausible conception of responsibility. Either way, (...)
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  4. John Kelsay, Sujatha Byravan, Sudhir Chella Rajan, Damning Souls, Toni Erskine, Thomas E. Doyle, Anne Schwenkenbecher, On Amartya Sen, Chris Brown & Rekha Nath (2010). Carnegie Council. Ethics and International Affairs 24.
     
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  5. Rekha Nath (2010). Global Institutionalism and Justice. In Stan van Hooft & Wim Vandekerckhove (eds.), Questioning Cosmopolitanism. Springer. 167--181.
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  6. Rekha Nath (2010). The Commitments of Cosmopolitanism. Ethics and International Affairs 24 (3):319-333.
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  7. Rekha Nath (2010). What is so Special About the State? In Gabriele de Angelis & Diogo P. Aurelio (eds.), Sovereign Justice: Global Justice in a World of Nations.
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  8. Rekha Nath (2005). Strong Medicine: Creating Incentives for Pharmaceutical Research on Neglected Diseases, Michael Kremer and Rachel Glennerster (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004), 152 Pp., $24.95 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 19 (3):103-106.
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  9. Thomas Pogge, Rekha Nath, Balakrishnan Rajagopal, Samuel Moyn, William E. Scheuerman & Joanne Bauer (2005). Recent Books on Ethics and International Affairs. Ethics and International Affairs 19 (3).
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