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Profile: Rekha Nath (University of Alabama)
  1. Rekha Nath (forthcoming). Equality for Inegalitarians, by George Sher. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-3.
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  2. Rekha Nath (forthcoming). George Sher, Equality for Inegalitarians. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
    What are society’s distributive obligations to its members? The central contribution of this book lies in its novel response to this question.
     
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  3. Rekha Nath (2015). On the Scope and Grounds of Social Equality. In Fabian Schuppert and Ivo Wallimann-Helmer Edited by Carina Fourie (ed.), Social Equality: Essays on What It Means to be Equals. Oxford University Press 186-208.
    On social equality, individuals ought to relate on terms of equality. An important issue concerning this theory, which has not received much attention, is its scope: which individuals ought to relate on egalitarian terms? The answer depends on the theory’s grounds: the basis upon which demands of social equality arise when they do. In this chapter, I consider how we ought to construe the scope and the grounds of social equality. I argue that underlying the considerations social egalitarians advance for (...)
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  4. Rekha Nath (2014). Against Institutional Luck Egalitarianism. Journal of Ethics and Social Philosophy 8 (1):1-19.
    Kok-Chor Tan has recently defended a novel theory of egalitarian distributive justice, institutional luck egalitarianism (ILE). On this theory, it is unjust for institutions to favor some individuals over others based on matters of luck. Tan takes his theory to preserve the intuitive appeal of luck egalitarianism while avoiding what he regards as absurd implications that face other versions of luck egalitarianism. Despite the centrality of the concept of institutional influence to his theory, Tan never spells out precisely what it (...)
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  5. Rekha Nath (2011). Equal Standing in the Global Community. The Monist 94 (4):593-614.
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  6. Rekha Nath (2011). Two Wrongs Don't Make a Right: A Critique of Virginia Held’s Deontological Justification of Terrorism. Social Theory and Practice 37 (4):679-696.
    Virginia Held argues that terrorism can be justified in some instances. But unlike standard, consequentialist justifications, hers is deontological. This paper critically examines her argument. It explores how the values of fairness, responsibility, and desert can serve to justify acts of terrorism. In doing so, two interpretations of her account are considered: a responsibility-insensitive and a responsibility-sensitive interpretation. On the first, her argument collapses into a consequentialist justification. On the second, it relies on an implausible conception of responsibility. Either way, (...)
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  7. Rekha Nath (2010). Global Institutionalism and Justice. In Stan van Hooft & Wim Vandekerckhove (eds.), Questioning Cosmopolitanism. Springer 167--181.
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  8. Rekha Nath (2010). The Commitments of Cosmopolitanism. Ethics and International Affairs 24 (3):319-333.
    Gillian Brock's "Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account" and Darrel Moellendorf's "Global Inequality Matters" present carefully crafted accounts of the obligations we have to non-compatriots and offer practical proposals for how we might get closer to meeting these obligations.
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  9. Rekha Nath (2010). What is so Special About the State? In Gabriele de Angelis & Diogo P. Aurelio (eds.), Sovereign Justice: Global Justice in a World of Nations.
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  10. Rekha Nath (2005). Strong Medicine: Creating Incentives for Pharmaceutical Research on Neglected Diseases, Michael Kremer and Rachel Glennerster (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2004), 152 Pp., $24.95 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 19 (3):103-106.