Search results for 'Relativity (Physics History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  40
    Thomas Ryckman (2005). The Reign of Relativity: Philosophy in Physics, 1915-1925. Oxford University Press.
    Universally recognized as bringing about a revolutionary transformation of the notions of space, time, and motion in physics, Einstein's theory of gravitation, known as "general relativity," was also a defining event for 20th century philosophy of science. During the decisive first ten years of the theory's existence, two main tendencies dominated its philosophical reception. This book is an extended argument that the path actually taken, which became logical empiricist philosophy of science, greatly contributed to the current impasse over realism, (...)
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  2.  59
    Thomas Ryckman (2011). What Does History Matter to Philosophy of Physics? Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):496-512.
    Naturalized metaphysics remains a default presupposition of much contemporary philosophy of physics. As metaphysics is supposed to be about the general structure of reality, so a naturalized metaphysics draws upon our best physical theories: Assuming the truth of such a theory, it attempts to answer the “foundational question par excellence “, “how could the world possibly be the way this theory says it is?“ It is argued that attention to historical detail in the development and formulation of physical theories serves (...)
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  3.  12
    Richard Staley (2008). Einstein's Generation: The Origins of the Relativity Revolution. University of Chicago Press.
    Much of the history of physics at the beginning of the twentieth century has been written with a sharp focus on a few key figures and a handful of notable events. Einstein’s Generation offers a distinctive new approach to the origins of modern physics by exploring both the material culture that stimulated relativity and the reaction of Einstein’s colleagues to his pioneering work. Richard Staley weaves together the diverse strands of experimental and theoretical physics, commercial instrument making, and (...)
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  4. Edward Slowik (2005). On the Cartesian Ontology of General Relativity: Or, Conventionalism in the History of the Substantival-Relational Debate. Philosophy of Science 72 (5):1312-1323.
    Utilizing Einstein’s comparison of General Relativity and Descartes’ physics, this investigation explores the alleged conventionalism that pervades the ontology of substantival and relationist conceptions of spacetime. Although previously discussed, namely by Rynasiewicz and Hoefer, it will be argued that the close similarities between General Relativity and Cartesian physics have not been adequately treated in the literature—and that the disclosure of these similarities bolsters the case for a conventionalist interpretation of spacetime ontology.
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  5.  88
    Huw Price, 1. The Most Underrated Discovery in the History of Physics?
    Late in the nineteenth century, physics noticed a puzzling conflict between the laws of physics and what actually happens. The laws make no distinction between past and future—if they allow a process to happen one way, they allow it in reverse.1 But many familiar processes are in practice ‘irreversible’, common in one orientation but unknown ‘backwards’. Air leaks out of a punctured tyre, for example, but never leaks back in. Hot drinks cool down to room temperature, but never spontaneously heat (...)
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  6. Amit Hagar (2014). Discrete or Continuous? The Quest for Fundamental Length in Modern Physics. Cambridge University Press.
    A book on the notion of fundamental length, covering issues in the philosophy of math, metaphysics, and the history and the philosophy of modern physics, from classical electrodynamics to current theories of quantum gravity. Published (2014) in Cambridge University Press.
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  7. Gary Zukav (1979). The Dancing Wu Li Masters: An Overview of the New Physics. Morrow.
     
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  8. Paul M. Clark (ed.) (1981). Modern Physics and Problems of Knowledge. Open University Press.
    Einstein, philosophical belief and physical theory -- Introduction to quantum theory -- Quantum theory, the Bohr-Einstein debate -- Physics and society.
     
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  9.  25
    D. Bohm (1971). Quantum Theory as an Indication of a New Order in Physics. Part A. The Development of New Orders as Shown Through the History of Physics. Foundations of Physics 1 (4):359-381.
    In this paper, we discuss the general significance of order in physics, as a first step toward the development of new notions of order. We begin with a brief historical discussion of the notions of order underlying ancient Greek views, and then go on to show how these changed in key ways with the rise of classical physics. This leads to a broader view of the significance of order, which helps to indicate what is to be meant by a change (...)
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  10.  2
    Chuang Liu (1992). Einstein and Relativistic Thermodynamics in 1952: A Historical and Critical Study of a Strange Episode in the History of Modern Physics. British Journal for the History of Science 25 (2):185-206.
    Over forty years after the foundations of the special theory of relativity had been securely laid, a heated debate, beginning in 1965, about the correct formulation of relativistic thermodynamics raged in the physics literature. Prior to 1965, relativistic thermodynamics was considered one of the most secure relativistic theories and one of the most simple and elegant examples of relativization in physics. It is, as its name apparently suggests, the result of the application of the special theory of relativity (...)
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  11.  6
    James T. Cushing (1998). Philosophical Concepts in Physics: The Historical Relation Between Philosophy and Scientific Theories. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines a selection of philosophical issues in the context of specific episodes in the development of physical theories. Advances in science are presented against the historical and philosophical backgrounds in which they occurred. A major aim is to impress upon the reader the essential role that philosophical considerations have played in the actual practice of science. The book begins with some necessary introduction to the history of ancient and early modern science, with major emphasis being given to (...)
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  12. John J. Stachel (ed.) (2005). Einstein's Miraculous Year: Five Papers That Changed the Face of Physics. Princeton University Press.
    After 1905, Einstein's miraculous year, physics would never be the same again. In those twelve months, Einstein shattered many cherished scientific beliefs with five extraordinary papers that would establish him as the world's leading physicist. This book brings those papers together in an accessible format. The best-known papers are the two that founded special relativity: On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies and Does the Inertia of a Body Depend on Its Energy Content? In the former, Einstein showed that absolute (...)
     
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  13. Niall Shanks (2003). Tim Maudlin, Quantum Non-Locality and Relativity: Metaphysical Intimations of Modern Physics (2nd Edn.). [REVIEW] Metascience 12 (1):97-100.
  14.  16
    Andrew Warwick (1992). Cambridge Mathematics and Cavendish Physics: Cunningham, Campbell and Einstein's Relativity 1905–1911 Part I: The Uses of Theory. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (4):625-656.
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  15.  9
    Andrew Warwick (1993). Cambridge Mathematics and Cavendish Physics: Cunningham, Campbell and Einstein's Relativity 1905–1911 Part II: Comparing Traditions in Cambridge Physics. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 24 (1):1-25.
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  16.  16
    Wolfgang Scheffel (1985). Space, Time, Relativity. The Foundations of Physics From the Viewpoint of Hegel's Philosophy of Nature. Philosophy and History 18 (1):37-38.
  17.  2
    Michel Ghins (2005). The Reign of Relativity: Philosophy in Physics 1915-1925. Metascience: An International Review Journal for the History, Philosophy and Social Studies of Science 16 (3):397-407.
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  18.  1
    Michael Stöltzner (2008). The Reign of Relativity: Philosophy in Physics, 1915–1925. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 99:858-859.
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  19.  35
    Jeroen van Dongen (2010). Einstein's Unification. Cambridge University Press.
    Why did Einstein tirelessly study unified field theory for more than 30 years? In this book, the author argues that Einstein believed he could find a unified theory of all of nature's forces by repeating the methods he used when he formulated general relativity. The book discusses Einstein's route to the general theory of relativity, focusing on the philosophical lessons that he learnt. It then addresses his quest for a unified theory for electromagnetism and gravity, discussing in detail (...)
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  20. A. A. Ti͡apkin (2004). Ob Istorii Vozniknovenii͡a "Teorii Otnositelʹnosti". Obʹedinennyĭ in-T I͡adernykh Issledovaniĭ.
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  21. Lewis Samuel Feuer (1974). Einstein and the Generations of Science. New York,Basic Books.
  22. Alessandro Braccesi (2008). Al di Là Dell'intuizione: Per Una Storia Della Fisica Del Ventesimo Secolo: Relatività E Quantistica. Bononia University Press.
    Proseguendo nella rilettura della fisica iniziata con il volume Una storia della fisica classica, l'autore tenta di tracciare una storia delle teorie della relatività e di quelle quantistiche. -/- Il taglio è quello del precedente volume: cercare di riscoprire le cose così come apparvero all'atto della loro scoperta e presentarle cercando di essere il più fedele possibile ai lavori originali, utilizzando ampie citazioni tratte da questi e mettendone in evidenza le motivazioni e i limiti. -/- Questa via, una via più (...)
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  23. M. Dardo (2004). Nobel Laureates and Twentieth-Century Physics. Cambridge University Press.
    Using an original approach, Mauro Dardo recounts the major achievements of twentieth-century physics--including relativity, quantum mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, the invention of the transistor and the laser, superconductivity, binary pulsars, and the Bose-Einstein condensate--as each emerged. His year-by-year chronicle, biographies and revealing personal anecdotes help bring to life the main events since the first Nobel Prize was awarded in 1901. The work of the most famous physicists of the twentieth century--including the Curies, Bohr, Heisenberg, Einstein, Fermi, Feynman, Gell-Mann, (...)
     
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  24.  1
    Jennifer Ouellette (2005). Black Bodies and Quantum Cats: Tales From the Annals of Physics. Penguin Books.
    Physics, once known as “natural philosophy,” is the most basic science, explaining the world we live in, from the largest scale down to the very, very, very smallest, and our understanding of it has changed over many centuries. In Black Bodies and Quantum Cats , science writer Jennifer Ouellette traces key developments in the field, setting descriptions of the fundamentals of physics in their historical context as well as against a broad cultural backdrop. Newton’s laws are illustrated via the film (...)
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  25. Helge Kragh (2011). Sommerfeld, the Quantum, and the Problem Approach to Physics. Metascience 20 (1):87-90.
    In the early phase of the new history of physics that emerged at about 1970 and was pioneered by John Heilbron, Thomas Kuhn, Paul Forman, and others, the quantum and atomic theories of the first three decades of the twentieth century played a central role. Since then, interest in the area has continued, but for the last few decades at a slower rate. While other areas of the new physics—such as the general theory of relativity—have attracted much attention, (...)
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  26.  3
    Robert G. Colodny (ed.) (1986). From Quarks to Quasars: Philosophical Problems of Modern Physics. University of Pittsburgh Press.
    In the history of science, only three hundred years separate the discoveries of Galileo and Albert Einstein. Recent science has brought us relativity theory, quantum mechanics, and elementary particle physics-in a radical and mercurial departure from earlier developments. In this collection of essays, four philosophers and one physicist consider the interactions of mathematics and physics with logic and philosophy in the rapidly changing environment of modern science.
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  27.  90
    Gareth Ernest Boardman (2013). Addressing the Conflict Between Relativity and Quantum Theory: Models, Measurement and the Markov Property. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (2):86-115.
    Twenty-first century science faces a dilemma. Two of its well-verified foundation stones - relativity and quantum theory - have proven inconsistent. Resolution of the conflict has resisted improvements in experimental precision leaving some to believe that some fundamental understanding in our world-view may need modification or even radical reform. Employment of the wave-front model of electrodynamics, as a propagation process with a Markov property, may offer just such a clarification.
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  28.  44
    Katherine Brading (2015). Physically Locating the Present: A Case of Reading Physics as a Contribution to Philosophy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 50:13-19.
    In this paper I argue that reading history of physics as a contribution to history of philosophy is important for contemporary philosophy of physics. My argument centers around a particular case: special relativity versus presentism. By means of resources drawn from reading aspects of Newton's work as contributions to philosophy, I argue that there is in physics an alternative way to approach what we mean by "present" such that presentism remains an open empirical question (...)
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  29.  12
    Mansoor Niaz (2014). Science Textbooks: The Role of History and Philosophy of Science. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer 1411-1441.
    Research in science education has recognized the importance of history and philosophy of science (HPS), and this has facilitated the evaluation of science textbooks. Purpose of this chapter is to review research based on analyses of science textbooks that explicitly use a history and philosophy of science framework. This review has focused on studies published in the 15-year period (1996–2010) and has drawn on the following major science education journals: International Journal of Science Education, Journal of Research in (...)
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  30.  32
    Alberto Cordero (2012). Rejected Posits, Realism, and the History of Science. In Henk W. de Regt (ed.), Epsa Philosophy of Science: Amsterdam 2009. Springer 23--32.
    Summary: Responding to Laudan’s skeptical reading of history an influential group of realists claim that the seriously wrong claims past successful theories licensed were not really implicated in the predictions that once singled them out as successful. For example, in the case of Fresnel’s theory of light, it is said that although he appealed to the ether he didn’t actually need to in order to derive his famous experimental predictions—in them, we are assured, the ether concept was “idle,” “inessential,” (...)
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  31.  30
    R. M. Nugayev (1985). The History of Quantum Mechanics as a Decisive Argument Favoring Einstein Over Lorentz. Philosophy of Science 52 (1):44-63.
    PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE, vol. 52, number 1, pp.44-63. R.M. Nugayev, Kazan State |University, USSR. -/- THE HISTORY OF QUANTUM THEORY AS A DECISIVE ARGUMENT FAVORING EINSTEIN OVER LJRENTZ. -/- Abstract. Einstein’s papers on relativity, quantum theory and statistical mechanics were all part of a single research programme ; the aim was to unify mechanics and electrodynamics. It was this broader program – which eventually split into relativistic physics and quantummmechanics – that superseded Lorentz’s theory. The argument of this (...)
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  32.  99
    Alberto Cordero, Rejected Posits, Realism, and the History of Science.
    Summary: Responding to Laudan’s skeptical reading of history an influential group of realists claim that the seriously wrong claims past successful theories licensed were not really implicated in the predictions that once singled them out as successful. For example, in the case of Fresnel’s theory of light, it is said that although he appealed to the ether he didn’t actually need to in order to derive his famous experimental predictions—in them, we are assured, the ether concept was “idle,” “inessential,” (...)
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  33. Jeremy Butterfield, The Philosophy of Physics.
    This is an excellent book, by a very distinguished historian and philosopher of physics. Roberto Torretti is principally known to historians and philosophers of physics through his previous books, Philosophy of Geometry from Riemann to Poincaré (1978), Relativity and Geometry (1983), and Creative Understanding: Philosophical Reflections on Physics (1990). As the first two titles suggest, his forte is the history and philosophy of geometry and spacetime physics, especially from the nineteenth century onwards. These two books were recognized as (...)
     
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  34. Chuang Liu (1991). Relativistic Thermodynamics: Its History and Foundations. Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
    Relativistic Thermodynamics of equilibrium processes has remained a strange chapter in the history of modern physics. It was established by Planck in 1908 as a simple application of Einstein's special theory of relativity. Einstein himself made substantial contributions and its final product remained officially unchallenged until 1965. In 1952, however, at the end of his career, Einstein challenged the theory in his correspondence with von Laue. Many of his unpublished suggestions anticipated the major works in the debate of (...)
     
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  35.  25
    C. K. Raju (2003). The Eleven Pictures of Time: The Physics, Philosophy, and Politics of Time Beliefs. Sage Publications.
    Visit the author's Web site at www.11PicsOfTime.com Time is a mystery that has perplexed humankind since time immemorial. Resolving this mystery is of significance not only to philosophers and physicists but is also a very practical concern. Our perception of time shapes our values and way of life; it also mediates the interaction between science and religion both of which rest fundamentally on assumptions about the nature of time. C K Raju begins with a critical exposition of various time-beliefs, ranging (...)
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  36.  12
    Michael Liston (2007). Roland Omnès. Converging Realities: Towards a Common Philosophy of Physics and Mathematics. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2005. Pp. XVII + 264. Isbn 0-691-11530-. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 15 (2):257-267.
    In this book physicist Roland Omnès addresses some big questions in philosophy of mathematics. Anyone who reflects on the history and practice of mathematics and the sciences, especially physics, will naturally be struck by some remarkable coincidences. First, often newly developed mathematics was not well understood. But its successful applications and its agreement with intuitive representations of reality promoted confidence in its correctness even absent clear foundations . Later, this confidence is vindicated when a proper setting for the (...)
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  37. Francisco J. Flores (1998). Levels of Theory and Types of Theoretical Explanation in Theoretical Physics. Dissertation, The University of Western Ontario (Canada)
    In Newtonian physics, there is a clear distinction between a "framework theory", a collection of general physical principles and definitions of physical terms, and theories that describe specific causal interactions such as gravitation, i.e., "interaction theories". I argue that this distinction between levels of theory can also be found in the context of Special Relativity and that recognizing it is essential for a philosophical account of how laws are explained in this theory. As a case study, I consider the (...)
     
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  38. Harvey R. Brown (2007). Physical Relativity: Space-Time Structure From a Dynamical Perspective. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Physical Relativity explores the nature of the distinction at the heart of Einstein's 1905 formulation of his special theory of relativity: that between kinematics and dynamics. Einstein himself became increasingly uncomfortable with this distinction, and with the limitations of what he called the 'principle theory' approach inspired by the logic of thermodynamics. A handful of physicists and philosophers have over the last century likewise expressed doubts about Einstein's treatment of the relativistic behaviour of rigid bodies and clocks in (...)
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  39. Harvey R. Brown (2005). Physical Relativity: Space-Time Structure From a Dynamical Perspective. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Physical Relativity explores the nature of the distinction at the heart of Einstein's 1905 formulation of his special theory of relativity: that between kinematics and dynamics. Einstein himself became increasingly uncomfortable with this distinction, and with the limitations of what he called the 'principle theory' approach inspired by the logic of thermodynamics. A handful of physicists and philosophers have over the last century likewise expressed doubts about Einstein's treatment of the relativistic behaviour of rigid bodies and clocks in (...)
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  40.  15
    Ryan Samaroo (2015). Friedman's Thesis. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 52:129-138.
    This essay examines Friedman's recent approach to the analysis of physical theories. Friedman argues against Quine that the identification of certain principles as ‘constitutive’ is essential to a satisfactory methodological analysis of physics. I explicate Friedman's characterization of a constitutive principle, and I evaluate his account of the constitutive principles that Newtonian and Einsteinian gravitation presuppose for their formulation. I argue that something close to Friedman's thesis is defensible.
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  41.  10
    Marc Holman (2014). Foundations of Quantum Gravity: The Role of Principles Grounded in Empirical Reality. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 46 (2):142-153.
    When attempting to assess the strengths and weaknesses of various principles in their potential role of guiding the formulation of a theory of quantum gravity, it is crucial to distinguish between principles which are strongly supported by empirical data – either directly or indirectly – and principles which instead rely heavily on theoretical arguments for their justification. Principles in the latter category are not necessarily invalid, but their a priori foundational significance should be regarded with due caution. These remarks are (...)
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  42.  7
    Domenico Giulini (2014). Does Cosmological Expansion Affect Local Physics? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 46 (1):24-37.
    In this contribution I wish to address the question whether, and how, the global cosmological expansion influences local physics, like particle orbits and black hole geometries. Regarding the former I argue that a pseudo Newtonian picture can be quite accurate if “expansion” is taken to be an attribute of the inertial structure rather than of “space” in some substantivalist sense. This contradicts the often-heard suggestion to imagine cosmological expansion as that of “space itself”. Regarding isolated objects in full General (...), like black holes, I emphasise the need for proper geometric characterisations in order to meaningfully compare them in different spacetimes, like static and expanding ones. Examples are discussed in some detail to clearly map out the problems. A slightly extended version of this contribution may be found at philsci-archive.pitt.edu/10033. (shrink)
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  43.  16
    B. G. Sidharth (2008). The Limits of Special Relativity. Foundations of Physics 38 (8):695-706.
    The Special Theory of Relativity and the Theory of the Electron have had an interesting history together. Originally the electron was studied in a non-relativistic context and this opened up the interesting possibility that lead to the conclusion that the mass of the electron could be thought of entirely in electromagnetic terms without introducing inertial considerations. However the application of Special Relativity lead to several problems, both for an extended electron and the point electron. These inconsistencies have, (...)
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  44.  33
    Joseph K. Cosgrove (2008). Simone Weil's Spiritual Critique of Modern Science: An Historical-Critical Assessment. Zygon 43 (2):353-370.
    Simone Weil is widely recognized today as one of the profound religious thinkers of the twentieth century. Yet while her interpretation of natural science is critical to Weil's overall understanding of religious faith, her writings on science have received little attention compared with her more overtly theological writings. The present essay, which builds on Vance Morgan's Weaving the World: Simone Weil on Science, Necessity, and Love (2005), critically examines Weil's interpretation of the history of science. Weil believed that mathematical (...)
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  45.  82
    Michel Janssen (2009). Drawing the Line Between Kinematics and Dynamics in Special Relativity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 40 (1):26-52.
    In his book, Physical Relativity, Harvey Brown challenges the orthodox view that special relativity is preferable to those parts of Lorentz's classical ether theory it replaced because it revealed various phenomena that were given a dynamical explanation in Lorentz's theory to be purely kinematical. I want to defend this orthodoxy. The phenomena most commonly discussed in this context in the philosophical literature are length contraction and time dilation. I consider three other phenomena of this kind that played a (...)
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  46.  33
    James Owen Weatherall (2011). On the Status of the Geodesic Principle in Newtonian and Relativistic Physics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 42 (4):276-281.
    A theorem due to Bob Geroch and Pong Soo Jang ["Motion of a Body in General Relativity." Journal of Mathematical Physics 16, ] provides a sense in which the geodesic principle has the status of a theorem in General Relativity. I have recently shown that a similar theorem holds in the context of geometrized Newtonian gravitation [Weatherall, J. O. "The Motion of a Body in Newtonian Theories." Journal of Mathematical Physics 52, ]. Here I compare the interpretations of (...)
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  47. Amit Hagar (2008). Length Matters: The Einstein–Swann Correspondence and the Constructive Approach to the Special Theory of Relativity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 39 (3):532-556.
    I discuss a rarely mentioned correspondence between Einstein and Swann on the constructive approach to the special theory of relativity, in which Einstein points out that the attempts to construct a dynamical explanation of relativistic kinematical effects require postulating a fundamental length scale in the level of the dynamics. I use this correspondence to shed light on several issues under dispute in current philosophy of spacetime that were highlighted recently in Harvey Brown’s monograph Physical Relativity, namely, Einstein’s view (...)
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  48.  38
    Michel Janssen (2012). The Twins and the Bucket: How Einstein Made Gravity Rather Than Motion Relative in General Relativity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 43 (3):159-175.
    In publications in 1914 and 1918, Einstein claimed that his new theory of gravity in some sense relativizes the rotation of a body with respect to the distant stars and the acceleration of the traveler with respect to the stay-at-home in the twin paradox. What he showed was that phenomena seen as inertial effects in a space-time coordinate system in which the non-accelerating body is at rest can be seen as a combination of inertial and gravitational effects in (...)
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  49.  20
    Dennis Lehmkuhl (2014). Why Einstein Did Not Believe That General Relativity Geometrizes Gravity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 46 (2):316-326.
    I argue that, contrary to folklore, Einstein never really cared for geometrizing the gravitational or the electromagnetic field; indeed, he thought that the very statement that General Relativity geometrizes gravity “is not saying anything at all”. Instead, I shall show that Einstein saw the “unification” of inertia and gravity as one of the major achievements of General Relativity. Interestingly, Einstein did not locate this unification in the field equations but in his interpretation of the geodesic equation, the law (...)
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  50.  55
    Nicholaos Jones (2009). General Relativity and the Standard Model: Why Evidence for One Does Not Disconfirm the Other. Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 40 (2):124-132.
    General Relativity and the Standard Model often are touted as the most rigorously and extensively confirmed scientific hypotheses of all time. Nonetheless, these theories appear to have consequences that are inconsistent with evidence about phenomena for which, respectively, quantum effects and gravity matter. This paper suggests an explanation for why the theories are not disconfirmed by such evidence. The key to this explanation is an approach to scientific hypotheses that allows their actual content to differ from their apparent content. (...)
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