Search results for 'Relativity (Physics Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

387 found
Order:
  1.  40
    Thomas Ryckman (2005). The Reign of Relativity: Philosophy in Physics, 1915-1925. Oxford University Press.
    Universally recognized as bringing about a revolutionary transformation of the notions of space, time, and motion in physics, Einstein's theory of gravitation, known as "general relativity," was also a defining event for 20th century philosophy of science. During the decisive first ten years of the theory's existence, two main tendencies dominated its philosophical reception. This book is an extended argument that the path actually taken, which became logical empiricist philosophy of science, greatly contributed to the current impasse (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  2. Thomas Ryckman (2008). The Reign of Relativity: Philosophy in Physics 1915-1925. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Universally recognized as bringing about a revolutionary transformation of the notions of space, time, and motion in physics, Einstein's theory of gravitation, known as "general relativity," was also a defining event for 20th century philosophy of science. During the decisive first ten years of the theory's existence, two main tendencies dominated its philosophical reception. This book is an extended argument that the path actually taken, which became logical empiricist philosophy of science, greatly contributed to the current impasse (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Peter Kosso (1998). Appearance and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Physics. Oxford University Press.
    Appearance and Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Physics addresses quantum mechanics and relativity and their philosophical implications, focusing on whether these theories of modern physics can help us know nature as it really is, or only as it appears to us. The author clearly explains the foundational concepts and principles of both quantum mechanics and relativity and then uses them to argue that we can know more than mere appearances, and that we can know to (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  4.  11
    Paul Fitzgerald (1972). Relativity Physics and the God of Process Philosophy. Process Studies 2 (4):251-276.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  5.  7
    Theodore de Laguna (1922). Philosophy and the New Physics. An Essay on the Relativity Theory and the Theory of Quanta. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 19 (14):389-389.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  62
    Mark van Atten (2008). Thomas Ryckman: The Reign of Relativity. Philosophy in Physics 1915–1925. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 24 (1):73-78.
  7.  16
    Wolfgang Scheffel (1985). Space, Time, Relativity. The Foundations of Physics From the Viewpoint of Hegel's Philosophy of Nature. Philosophy and History 18 (1):37-38.
  8.  12
    Roy Wood Sellars (1946). The Philosophy and Physics of Relativity. Philosophy of Science 13 (3):177-195.
  9.  2
    Michel Ghins (2005). The Reign of Relativity: Philosophy in Physics 1915-1925. Metascience: An International Review Journal for the History, Philosophy and Social Studies of Science 16 (3):397-407.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Louis Rougier & Morton Masius (1922). Philosophy and the New Physics. An Essay on the Relativity Theory and the Theory of Quanta. Journal of Philosophy 19 (14):389-389.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  13
    R. Torretti (2006). Review: The Reign of Relativity: Philosophy in Physics 1915-1925. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (459):808-811.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  1
    Boris Kalin (2006). The Theory of Relativity in High School Philosophy and Physics. Filozofska Istrazivanja 26 (3):571-584.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  1
    Michael Stöltzner (2008). The Reign of Relativity: Philosophy in Physics, 1915–1925. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 99:858-859.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Tim Maudlin (2002). Quantum Non-Locality and Relativity: Metaphysical Intimations of Modern Physics. Blackwell Publishers.
    This second edition also includes a new author's preface and an additional appendix.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   44 citations  
  15. Roger B. Angel (1980). Relativity, the Theory and its Philosophy. Pergamon Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  16. Nick Huggett (2010). Everywhere and Everywhen: Adventures in Physics and Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Why does time pass and space does not? Are there just three dimensions? What is a quantum particle? Nick Huggett shows that philosophy -- armed with a power to analyze fundamental concepts and their relationship to the human experience -- has much to say about these profound questions about the universe. In Everywhere and Everywhen, Huggett charts a journey that peers into some of the oldest questions about the world, through some of the newest, such as: What shape is (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  17.  77
    Jeremy Butterfield & John Earman (eds.) (2007). Philosophy of Physics. Elsevier.
    The ambition of this volume is twofold: to provide a comprehensive overview of the field and to serve as an indispensable reference work for anyone who wants to work in it. For example, any philosopher who hopes to make a contribution to the topic of the classical-quantum correspondence will have to begin by consulting Klaas Landsman’s chapter. The organization of this volume, as well as the choice of topics, is based on the conviction that the important problems in the (...) of physics arise from studying the foundations of the fundamental theories of physics. It follows that there is no sharp line to be drawn between philosophy of physics and physics itself. Some of the best work in the philosophy of physics is being done by physicists, as witnessed by the fact that several of the contributors to the volume are theoretical physicists: viz., Ellis, Emch, Harvey, Landsman, Rovelli, ‘t Hooft, the last of whom is a Nobel laureate. Key features - Definitive discussions of the philosophical implications of modern physics - Masterly expositions of the fundamental theories of modern physics - Covers all three main pillars of modern physics: relativity theory, quantum theory, and thermal physics - Covers the new sciences grown from these theories: for example, cosmology from relativity theory; and quantum information and quantum computing, from quantum theory - Contains special Chapters that address crucial topics that arise in several different theories, such as symmetry and determinism - Written by very distinguished theoretical physicists, including a Nobel Laureate, as well as by philosophers - Definitive discussions of the philosophical implications of modern physics - Masterly expositions of the fundamental theories of modern physics - Covers all three main pillars of modern physics: relativity theory, quantum theory, and thermal physics - Covers the new sciences that have grown from these theories: for example, cosmology from relativity theory; and quantum information and quantum computing, from quantum theory - Contains special Chapters that address crucial topics that arise in several different theories, such as symmetry and determinism - Written by very distinguished theoretical physicists, including a Nobel Laureate, as well as by philosophers. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  18.  6
    John Earman & Jeremy Butterfield (eds.) (2007). Philosophy of Physics. Elsevier.
    The ambition of this volume is twofold: to provide a comprehensive overview of the field and to serve as an indispensable reference work for anyone who wants to work in it. For example, any philosopher who hopes to make a contribution to the topic of the classical-quantum correspondence will have to begin by consulting Klaas Landsman’s chapter. The organization of this volume, as well as the choice of topics, is based on the conviction that the important problems in the (...) of physics arise from studying the foundations of the fundamental theories of physics. It follows that there is no sharp line to be drawn between philosophy of physics and physics itself. Some of the best work in the philosophy of physics is being done by physicists, as witnessed by the fact that several of the contributors to the volume are theoretical physicists: viz., Ellis, Emch, Harvey, Landsman, Rovelli, ‘t Hooft, the last of whom is a Nobel laureate. Key features - Definitive discussions of the philosophical implications of modern physics - Masterly expositions of the fundamental theories of modern physics - Covers all three main pillars of modern physics: relativity theory, quantum theory, and thermal physics - Covers the new sciences grown from these theories: for example, cosmology from relativity theory; and quantum information and quantum computing, from quantum theory - Contains special Chapters that address crucial topics that arise in several different theories, such as symmetry and determinism - Written by very distinguished theoretical physicists, including a Nobel Laureate, as well as by philosophers - Definitive discussions of the philosophical implications of modern physics - Masterly expositions of the fundamental theories of modern physics - Covers all three main pillars of modern physics: relativity theory, quantum theory, and thermal physics - Covers the new sciences that have grown from these theories: for example, cosmology from relativity theory; and quantum information and quantum computing, from quantum theory - Contains special Chapters that address crucial topics that arise in several different theories, such as symmetry and determinism - Written by very distinguished theoretical physicists, including a Nobel Laureate, as well as by philosophers. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  2
    Jeremy Butterfield & Constantine Pagonis (eds.) (1999). From Physics to Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays by leading philosophers of physics was first published in 2000, and offers philosophical perspectives on two of the central elements of modern physics, quantum theory and relativity. The topics examined include the notorious 'measurement problem' of quantum theory and the attempts to solve it by attributing extra values to physical quantities, the mysterious non-locality of quantum theory, the curious properties of spatial localization in relativistic quantum theories, and the problem of time in the search for (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  6
    James T. Cushing (1998). Philosophical Concepts in Physics: The Historical Relation Between Philosophy and Scientific Theories. Cambridge University Press.
    This book examines a selection of philosophical issues in the context of specific episodes in the development of physical theories. Advances in science are presented against the historical and philosophical backgrounds in which they occurred. A major aim is to impress upon the reader the essential role that philosophical considerations have played in the actual practice of science. The book begins with some necessary introduction to the history of ancient and early modern science, with major emphasis being given to the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  21. J. R. Lucas (1990). Spacetime and Electromagnetism: An Essay on the Philosophy of the Special Theory of Relativity. Oxford University Press.
    That space and time should be integrated into a single entity, spacetime, is the great insight of Einstein's special theory of relativity, and leads us to regard spacetime as a fundamental context in which to make sense of the world around us. But it is not the only one. Causality is equally important and at least as far as the special theory goes, it cannot be subsumed under a fundamentally geometrical form of explanation. In fact, the agent of propagation (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   10 citations  
  22.  59
    Thomas Ryckman (2011). What Does History Matter to Philosophy of Physics? Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):496-512.
    Naturalized metaphysics remains a default presupposition of much contemporary philosophy of physics. As metaphysics is supposed to be about the general structure of reality, so a naturalized metaphysics draws upon our best physical theories: Assuming the truth of such a theory, it attempts to answer the “foundational question par excellence “, “how could the world possibly be the way this theory says it is?“ It is argued that attention to historical detail in the development and formulation of physical theories (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  23.  16
    Theophanes Grammenos (2015). Geometry, Relativity, and Philosophy. Metascience 24 (1):141-145.
    David Malament, now emeritus at the University of California, Irvine, where since 1999 he served as a Distinguished Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science after having spent twenty-three years as a faculty member at the University of Chicago , is well known as the author of numerous articles on the mathematical and philosophical foundations of modern physics with an emphasis on problems of space-time structure and the foundations of relativity theory. Malament’s Topics in the foundations of general (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Max Jammer (2009). Concepts of Mass in Contemporary Physics and Philosophy. Princeton University Press.
    The concept of mass is one of the most fundamental notions in physics, comparable in importance only to those of space and time. But in contrast to the latter, which are the subject of innumerable physical and philosophical studies, the concept of mass has been but rarely investigated. Here Max Jammer, a leading philosopher and historian of physics, provides a concise but comprehensive, coherent, and self-contained study of the concept of mass as it is defined, interpreted, and applied in contemporary (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  25. Karen Michelle Barad (2007). Meeting the Universe Halfway: Quantum Physics and the Entanglement of Matter and Meaning. Duke University Press.
  26. Andrew Paul Ushenko (1937). The Philosophy of Relativity. London, G. Allen & Unwin, Ltd..
  27.  44
    Katherine Brading (2015). Physically Locating the Present: A Case of Reading Physics as a Contribution to Philosophy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 50:13-19.
    In this paper I argue that reading history of physics as a contribution to history of philosophy is important for contemporary philosophy of physics. My argument centers around a particular case: special relativity versus presentism. By means of resources drawn from reading aspects of Newton's work as contributions to philosophy, I argue that there is in physics an alternative way to approach what we mean by "present" such that presentism remains an open empirical question whose refutation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  60
    Mauro Dorato (2010). On Various Senses of “Conventional” and Their Interrelation in the Philosophy of Physics: Simultaneity as a Case Study. In Thomas Uebel, Stephan Hartmann, Wenceslao Gonzalez, Marcel Weber, Dennis Dieks & Friedrich Stadler (eds.), The Present Situation in the Philosophy of Science. Springer 335--349.
    My aim in this note is to disambiguate various senses of ‘conventional’ that in the philosophy of physics have been frequently conflated. As a case study, I will refer to the well-known issue of the conventionality of simultaneity in the special theory of relativity, since it is particularly in this context that the above mentioned confusion is present.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  44
    Herbert Dingle (1979). Time in Philosophy and in Physics. Philosophy 54 (207):99 - 104.
    The essay centers on Godel's views on the place of our intuitive concept of time in philosophy and in physics. It presents my interpretation of his work on the theory of relativity, his observations on the relationship between Einstein's theory and Kantian philosophy, as well as some of the scattered remarks in his conversations with me in the seventies-namely, those of the philosophies of Leibniz, Hegel and Husserl-as a successor of Kant-in relation to their conceptions of time.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  44
    Michael Esfeld (1999). Holism in Cartesianism and in Today's Philosophy of Physics. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 30 (1):17-36.
    The aim of this paper is to contribute to a more balanced judgement than the widespread impression that the changes which are called for in today's philosophy of physics and which centre around the concept of holism amount to a rupture with the framework of Cartesian philosophy of physics. I argue that this framework includes a sort of holism: As a result of the identification of matter with space, any physical property can be instantiated only if there is (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Hermann Weyl & Peter Pesic (eds.) (2009). Mind and Nature: Selected Writings on Philosophy, Mathematics, and Physics. Princeton University Press.
    Hermann Weyl was one of the twentieth century's most important mathematicians, as well as a seminal figure in the development of quantum physics and general relativity. He was also an eloquent writer with a lifelong interest in the philosophical implications of the startling new scientific developments with which he was so involved. Mind and Nature is a collection of Weyl's most important general writings on philosophy, mathematics, and physics, including pieces that have never before been published in any (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  32.  25
    Hans Reichenbach (2006). Defending Einstein: Hans Reichenbach's Writings on Space, Time, and Motion. Cambridge University Press.
    Hans Reichenbach, a philosopher of science who was one of five students in Einstein's first seminar on the general theory of relativity, became Einstein's bulldog, defending the theory against criticism from philosophers, physicists, and popular commentators. This book chronicles the development of Reichenbach's reconstruction of Einstein's theory in a way that clearly sets out all of its philosophical commitments and its physical predictions as well as the battles that Reichenbach fought on its behalf, in both the academic and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  33. Martin Johnson (1947). Time, Knowledge, and the Nebulae an Introduction to the Meanings of Time in Physics, Astronomy, and Philosophy, and the Relatives of Einstein and of Milne. Dover Publications.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Hao Wang (1995). Time in Philosophy and in Physics: From Kant and Einstein to Gödel. Synthese 102 (2):215 - 234.
    The essay centers on Gödel's views on the place of our intuitive concept of time in philosophy and in physics. It presents my interpretation of his work on the theory of relativity, his observations on the relationship between Einstein's theory and Kantian philosophy, as well as some of the scattered remarks in his conversations with me in the seventies — namely, those on the philosophies of Leibniz, Hegel and Husserl — as a successor of Kant — in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  35. Jeremy Butterfield & John Earman, Introduction to the Philosophy of Physics: Volume 2 of the North-Holland Series, the Handbook of the Philosophy of Science.
    This is the editors' introduction to a new anthology of commissioned articles covering the various branches of philosophy of physics. We introduce the articles in terms of the three pillars of modern physics: relativity theory, quantum theory and thermal physics. We end by discussing the present state, and future prospects, of fundamental physics.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Jeremy Butterfield, The Philosophy of Physics.
    This is an excellent book, by a very distinguished historian and philosopher of physics. Roberto Torretti is principally known to historians and philosophers of physics through his previous books, Philosophy of Geometry from Riemann to Poincaré (1978), Relativity and Geometry (1983), and Creative Understanding: Philosophical Reflections on Physics (1990). As the first two titles suggest, his forte is the history and philosophy of geometry and spacetime physics, especially from the nineteenth century onwards. These two books were recognized (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  59
    Dennis Dieks, The Adolescence of Relativity: Einstein, Minkowski, and the Philosophy of Space and Time.
    An often repeated account of the genesis of special relativity tells us that relativity theory was to a considerable extent the fruit of an operationalist philosophy of science. Indeed, Einstein’s 1905 paper stresses the importance of rods and clocks for giving concrete physical content to spatial and temporal notions. I argue, however, that it would be a mistake to read too much into this. Einstein’s operationalist remarks should be seen as serving rhetoric purposes rather than as attempts (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  12
    Michael Liston (2007). Roland Omnès. Converging Realities: Towards a Common Philosophy of Physics and Mathematics. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2005. Pp. XVII + 264. Isbn 0-691-11530-. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 15 (2):257-267.
    In this book physicist Roland Omnès addresses some big questions in philosophy of mathematics. Anyone who reflects on the history and practice of mathematics and the sciences, especially physics, will naturally be struck by some remarkable coincidences. First, often newly developed mathematics was not well understood. But its successful applications and its agreement with intuitive representations of reality promoted confidence in its correctness even absent clear foundations . Later, this confidence is vindicated when a proper setting for the concepts (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Jeremy Butterfield & Constantine Pagonis (eds.) (2011). From Physics to Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays by leading philosophers of physics was first published in 2000, and offers philosophical perspectives on two of the central elements of modern physics, quantum theory and relativity. The topics examined include the notorious 'measurement problem' of quantum theory and the attempts to solve it by attributing extra values to physical quantities, the mysterious non-locality of quantum theory, the curious properties of spatial localization in relativistic quantum theories, and the problem of time in the search for (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Jeremy Butterfield & Constantine Pagonis (eds.) (2010). From Physics to Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays by leading philosophers of physics was first published in 2000, and offers philosophical perspectives on two of the central elements of modern physics, quantum theory and relativity. The topics examined include the notorious 'measurement problem' of quantum theory and the attempts to solve it by attributing extra values to physical quantities, the mysterious non-locality of quantum theory, the curious properties of spatial localization in relativistic quantum theories, and the problem of time in the search for (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Nick Huggett (2010). Everywhere and Everywhen: Adventures in Physics and Philosophy. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Why does time pass and space does not? Are there just three dimensions? What is a quantum particle? Nick Huggett shows that philosophy -- armed with a power to analyze fundamental concepts and their relationship to the human experience -- has much to say about these profound questions about the universe. In Everywhere and Everywhen, Huggett charts a journey that peers into some of the oldest questions about the world, through some of the newest, such as: What shape is (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  30
    Jeffrey Koperski (2015). The Physics of Theism: God, Physics, and the Philosophy of Science. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Theologians and philosophers of religion are increasingly interested in physics. From the fine-tuning of universal constants to quantum mechanics, relativity, and cosmology, physics is a surprisingly common subject where religion is involved. Bridging the gap between issues in religion and those in physics can be quite difficult, however. Fortunately, the philosophy of science provides a middle ground between the two disciplines. In this book, a philosopher of science provides a critical analysis of the ways in which physics is (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  70
    Max Jammer (2006). Concepts of Simultaneity: From Antiquity to Einstein and Beyond. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Max Jammer's Concepts of Simultaneity presents a comprehensive, accessible account of the historical development of an important and controversial concept -- which played a critical role in initiating modern theoretical physics -- from the days of Egyptian hieroglyphs through to Einstein's work in 1905, and beyond. Beginning with the use of the concept of simultaneity in ancient Egypt and in the Bible, the study discusses its role in Greek and medieval philosophy as well as its significance in Newtonian physics (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  44. Tim Budden (1996). Geometry, Symmetry and Locality in the Philosophy of Special Relativity.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  45.  24
    C. K. Raju (2003). The Eleven Pictures of Time: The Physics, Philosophy, and Politics of Time Beliefs. Sage Publications.
    Visit the author's Web site at www.11PicsOfTime.com Time is a mystery that has perplexed humankind since time immemorial. Resolving this mystery is of significance not only to philosophers and physicists but is also a very practical concern. Our perception of time shapes our values and way of life; it also mediates the interaction between science and religion both of which rest fundamentally on assumptions about the nature of time. C K Raju begins with a critical exposition of various time-beliefs, ranging (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46.  66
    D. G. B. J. Dieks (2011). E. W. Beth as a Philosopher of Physics. Synthese 179 (2):271 - 284.
    This paper examines E. W. Beth's work in the philosophy of physics, both from a historical and a systematic point of view. Beth saw the philosophy of physics first of all as an opportunity to illustrate and promulgate a new and modern general approach to the philosophy of nature and to philosophy tout court: an approach characterized negatively by its rejection of all traditional metaphysics and positively by its firm orientation towards science. Beth was successful in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  10
    Steven Gimbel (2012). Einstein's Jewish Science: Physics at the Intersection of Politics and Religion. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Introduction : Einstein's Jewish science -- Is Einstein a Jew? -- Is relativity pregnant with Jewish concepts? -- Why did a Jew formulate the theory of relativity? -- Is the theory of relativity political science or scientific politics? -- Einstein and the Jewish intelligentsia -- Einstein's liberal science? -- Conclusion : Einstein's cosmopolitan science.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  46
    Roberto Torretti (1983/1996). Relativity and Geometry. Dover Publications.
    This high-level study discusses Newtonian principles and 19th-century views on electrodynamics and the aether. Additional topics include Einstein's electrodynamics of moving bodies, Minkowski spacetime, gravitational geometry, time and causality, and other subjects. Highlights include a rich exposition of the elements of the special and general theories of relativity.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   20 citations  
  49.  5
    Philipp Frank (1951). Relativity, as Richer Truth. London, Cape.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  50. Paul M. Clark (ed.) (1981). Modern Physics and Problems of Knowledge. Open University Press.
    Einstein, philosophical belief and physical theory -- Introduction to quantum theory -- Quantum theory, the Bohr-Einstein debate -- Physics and society.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 387