Search results for 'Religion Forecasting' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michel Despland, Gérard Vallée & Canadian Corporation for Studies in Religion (1992). Religion in History the Word, the Idea, the Reality = la Religion Dans l'Histoire : Le Mot, l'Idée, la Réalité. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  2. David Ray Griffin & American Academy of Religion (1972). Philosophy of Religion and Theology, 1972 Working Papers Read to the Philosophy of Religion and Theology Section, American Academy of Religion, Annual Meeting, 1972. American Academy of Religion.
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  3. David Ray Griffin & American Academy of Religion (1971). Philosophy of Religion and Theology: 1971. American Academy of Religion.
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  4. David E. Klemm (2008). Religion and the Human Future: An Essay on Theological Humanism. Blackwell Pub..
    The shape of theological humanism -- Ideas and challenges -- The humanist imagination -- Thinking of God -- The logic of Christian humanism -- On the integrity of life -- The task of theological humanism -- Our endangered garden -- A school of conscience -- Masks of mind -- Religion and spiritual integrity -- Living theological humanism.
     
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  5. John S. Wilkins & Paul E. Griffiths (forthcoming). Evolutionary Debunking Arguments in Three Domains: Fact, Value, and Religion. In James Maclaurin Greg Dawes (ed.), A New Science of Religion. Routledge
    Ever since Darwin people have worried about the sceptical implications of evolution. If our minds are products of evolution like those of other animals, why suppose that the beliefs they produce are true, rather than merely useful? We consider this problem for beliefs in three different domains: religion, morality, and commonsense and scientific claims about matters of empirical fact. We identify replies to evolutionary scepticism that work in some domains but not in others. One reply is that evolution can (...)
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  6. Massimo Pigliucci (2014). 5 Questions on Science & Religion. In Gregg D. Caruso (ed.), 5 Questions on Science & Religion. Automatic Press 163-170.
    Are science and religion compatible when it comes to understanding cosmology (the origin of the universe), biology (the origin of life and of the human species), ethics, and the human mind (minds, brains, souls, and free will)? Do science and religion occupy non-overlapping magisteria? Is Intelligent Design a scientific theory? How do the various faith traditions view the relationship between science and religion? What, if any, are the limits of scientific explanation? What are the most important open (...)
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  7.  29
    J. L. Schellenberg (2005). Prolegomena to a Philosophy of Religion. Cornell University Press.
    Providing an original and systematic treatment of foundational issues in philosophy of religion, J. L. Schellenberg's new book addresses the structure of..
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  8. Serge Grigoriev (2011). Rorty, Religion, and Humanism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (3):187-201.
    This article offers a review of Richard Rorty’s attempts to come to terms with the role of religion in our public and intellectual life by tracing the key developments in his position, partially in response to the ubiquitous criticisms of his distinction between private and public projects. Since Rorty rejects the possibility of dismissing religion on purely epistemic grounds, he is determined to treat it, instead, as a matter of politics. My suggestion is that, in this respect, Rorty’s (...)
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  9.  9
    Enzo Rossi (forthcoming). Understanding Religion, Governing Religion: A Realist Perspective. In C. Laborde A. Bardon (ed.), Religion in Liberal Political Philosophy. Oxford University Press
    Cécile Laborde has argued that the freedom we think of as ‘freedom of religion’ should be understood as a bundle of separate and relatively independent freedoms. I criticise that approach by pointing out that it is insufficiently sensitive to facts about the sorts of entities that liberal states are. I argue that states have good reasons to mould phenomena such as religion into easily governable monoliths. If this is a problem from the normative point of view, it is (...)
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  10. Andrew Chignell (2010). The Devil, The Virgin, and the Envoy: Symbols of Moral Struggle in Religion II.2. In Otfried Hoeffe (ed.), Klassiker Auslegen: Religion innerhalb der Grenzen der blossen. Akademie Verlag
  11.  66
    Victoria Harrison (2010). Philosophy of Religion, Fictionalism, and Religious Diversity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1):43-58.
    Until recently philosophy of religion has been almost exclusively focused upon the analysis of western religious ideas. The central concern of the discipline has been the concept God , as that concept has been understood within Judaeo-Christianity. However, this narrow remit threatens to render philosophy of religion irrelevant today. To avoid this philosophy of religion should become a genuinely multicultural discipline. But how, if at all, can philosophy of religion rise to this challenge? The paper considers (...)
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  12.  63
    Pamela Sue Anderson & Beverley Clack (eds.) (2004). Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Critical Readings. Routledge.
    Feminist philosophy of religion as a subject of study has developed in recent years because of the identification and exposure of explicit sexism in much of the traditional philosophical thinking about religion. This struggle with a discipline shaped almost exclusively by men has led feminist philosophers to redress the problematic biases of gender, race, class and sexual orientation of the subject. Anderson and Clack bring together new and key writings on the core topics and approaches to this growing (...)
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  13.  87
    Maeve Cooke (2006). Salvaging and Secularizing the Semantic Contents of Religion: The Limitations of Habermas's Postmetaphysical Proposal. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):187 - 207.
    The article considers Jürgen Habermas's views on the relationship between postmetaphysical philosophy and religion. It outlines Habermas's shift from his earlier, apparently dismissive attitude towards religion to his presently more receptive stance. This more receptive stance is evident in his recent emphasis on critical engagement with the semantic contents of religion and may be characterized by two interrelated theses: (a) the view that religious contributions should be included in political deliberations in the informally organized public spheres of (...)
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  14.  74
    Moritz Baumstark (2012). The End of Empire and the Death of Religion : A Reconsideration of Hume's Later Political Thought. In Ruth Savage (ed.), Philosophy and Religion in Enlightenment Britain: New Case Studies. Oxford University Press
    This essay reconsiders David Hume’s thinking on the fate of the British Empire and the future of established religion. It provides a detailed reconstruction of the development of Hume’s views on Britain’s successive attempts to impose or regain its authority over its North American colonies and compares these views with the stance taken during the American Crisis by Adam Smith and Josiah Tucker. Fresh light is shed on this area of Hume’s later political thought by a new letter, appended (...)
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  15.  43
    Alan Padgett (2010). Overcoming the Problem of Induction: Science and Religion as Ways of Knowing. In Science and Religion in Dialogue. Wiley-Blackwell 862--883.
    This chapter contains sections titled: * The Problem of Induction * Reid’s Common-Sense Realism * Tradition and Reason in the Principles of Informal Inference * Back to the Rationality of Religion * Notes * Bibliography.
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  16.  15
    Herman Westerink (2012). Spirituality in Psychology of Religion: A Concept in Search of Its Meaning. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 34 (1):3-15.
    In this article it is argued that the apparent vagueness and broadness of the concept ‘spirituality’ and the difficulty in finding an agreeable definition for it are related to the different meanings of the concept within different intellectual and religious contexts and, subsequently, to different valuations of spirituality in relation to religion and lived religiosity. This article also examines the concept spirituality in the context of the psychology of religion’s historical entanglement with theology. On the one hand, the (...)
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  17.  54
    Timothy M. Costelloe (2004). `In Every Civilized Community': Hume on Belief and the Demise of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 55 (3):171-185.
    This paper considers the claim that Hume washostile to religion and religious belief, andhoped for their demise. Part one examines hisapproach to belief, showing how commentatorstake him to see religious belief asnon-natural. Part two challenges thisconclusion by arguing, first, that Hume'sdistinction between natural and artificialvirtue allows the term ``natural'' to coverreligious belief as well; second, that Humehimself never denies religious belief isnatural, and, third, that he takes religion tobe a necessary part of any flourishing society. The target of (...)
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  18.  57
    Philip Clayton (2010). Something New Under the Sun: Forty Years of Philosophy of Religion, with a Special Look at Process Philosophy. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1):139-152.
    Looking back over the last 40 years of work in the philosophy of religion provides a fascinating vantage point from which to assess the state of the discipline today. I describe central features of American philosophy of religion in 1970 and reconstruct the last 40 years as a progression through four main stages. This analysis offers an overarching framework from which to examine the major contributions and debates of process philosophy of religion during the same period. The (...)
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  19.  10
    D. Z. Phillips (ed.) (1996). Religion and Morality. St. Martin's Press.
    Reflection on religion inevitably involves consideration of its relation to morality. When great evil is done to human beings, we may feel that something absolute has been violated. Can that sense, which is related to gratitude for existence, be expressed without religious concepts? Can we express central religious concerns, such as losing the self, while abandoning any religious metaphysic? Is moral obligation itself dependent on divine commands if it is to be objective, or is morality not only independent of (...)
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  20.  11
    Dave Vliegenthart (2011). Can Neurotheology Explain Religion? Archive for the Psychology of Religion 33 (2):137-171.
    Neurotheology is a fast-growing field of research. Combining philosophy of mind, neuroscience, and religious studies, it takes a new approach to old questions on religion. What is religion and why do we have it? Neurotheologists focus on the search for the neural correlate of religious experiences. If we can trace religious experiences to specific parts of the brain, chances are we can reduce religion as such to that grey soggy matter as well. This article predicts neurotheology will (...)
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  21.  31
    Christopher Callaway (2011). Keeping Score: The Consequential Critique of Religion. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 70 (3):231-246.
    This essay attempts to specify just what one would need to show in order to draw any substantive conclusion about religion’s consequential value. It is focused on three central questions: (1) What exactly is being evaluated? (2) What benefits and harms are relevant? (3) How are the relevant benefits and harms to be assessed? Each of these questions gives rise to a range of thorny philosophical and empirical issues, and any thesis about religion’s ultimate consequential value will therefore (...)
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  22.  6
    Tomis Kapitan (2009). Evaluating Religion. In Jonathan L. Kvanvig (ed.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion: Volume 2. OUP Oxford
    This paper examines the nature of religion. A definition of religion is proposed, and a major rival interpretation -- that of John Hick -- is examined and rejected. It is then explained how religions can be evaluated.
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  23.  21
    John Roth (2010). Easy to Remember?: Genocide and the Philosophy of Religion. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 68 (1):31-42.
    Philosophers of religion have written a great deal about the problem of evil. Their reflections, however, have not concentrated, at least not extensively or sufficiently, on the particularities of evil that manifest themselves in genocide. Concentrating on some of those particularities, this essay reflects on genocide, which has sometimes been called the crime of crimes, to raise questions such as: how should genocide affect the philosophy of religion and what might philosophers of religion contribute to help check (...)
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  24.  83
    Matthew C. Halteman (2002). Toward a Continental Philosophy of Religion: Derrida, Responsibility, and Non-Dogmatic Faith. In Philip Goodchild (ed.), Rethinking Philosophy of Religion: Approaches from Continental Philosophy. Fordham University Press
    From its inception in Kant's efforts to articulate a "religion within the limits of reason alone," the Continental tradition has maintained a strict division of labor between theological and philosophical reflection on religion. In what follows, I examine this continental legacy in the context of Jacques Derrida's recent work on the concept of responsibility. First I discuss three guiding themes (the limits of speculative analysis, the idea of nondogmatic religion, and the importance of the other) that characterize (...)
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  25.  9
    Merold Westphal (1987). God, Guilt, and Death: An Existential Phenomenology of Religion. Indiana University Press.
    "... a profoundly stimulating and satisfying piece of philosophy.... It is a book from which one really can learn something worthwhile." —Idealistic Studies "... exceptionally well-written philosophy of religion... " —Mentalities "... a most impressive phenomenology of religion... a splendid achievement... " —The Reformed Theological Review "... challenging to scholars... interesting to general audiences." —International Journal for Philosophy of Religion "... equal in clarity of thought and comprehensiveness of scope.... profoundly original." —The Reformed Journal "Challenging and thought-provoking, (...)
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  26.  6
    Helen Tattam (2016). Atheism, Religion, and Philosophical “Availability” in Gabriel Marcel. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 79 (1):19-30.
    The dramatic change in the focus and overall project of French philosophy since World War I has become increasingly apparent, with one of the resultant developments being, as Geroulanos has identified, the emergence of “an atheism that is not humanist.” This article discusses parallels between the philosophical methodology of Gabriel Marcel and this new form of atheism. In so doing, it explores connections between Marcel and French philosophy’s more recent “turn to religion,” and uses these to demonstrate how Marcel’s (...)
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  27.  79
    James DiCenso (2007). Kant, Freud, and the Ethical Critique of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 61 (3):161 - 179.
    This paper engages Freud’s relation to Kant, with specific reference to each theorist’s articulation of the interconnections between ethics and religion. I argue that there is in fact a constructive approach to ethics and religion in Freud’s thought, and that this approach can be better understood by examining it in relation to Kant’s formulations on these topics. Freud’s thinking about religion and ethics participates in the Enlightenment heritage, with its emphasis on autonomy and rationality, of which Kant’s (...)
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  28.  33
    Billy Joe Lucas (2012). The Right to Believe Truth Paradoxes of Moral Regret for No Belief and the Role(s) of Logic in Philosophy of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 72 (2):115-138.
    I offer you some theories of intellectual obligations and rights (virtue Ethics): initially, RBT (a Right to Believe Truth, if something is true it follows one has a right to believe it), and, NDSM (one has no right to believe a contradiction, i.e., No right to commit Doxastic Self-Mutilation). Evidence for both below. Anthropology, Psychology, computer software, Sociology, and the neurosciences prove things about human beliefs, and History, Economics, and comparative law can provide evidence of value about theories of rights. (...)
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  29.  14
    Nicholas Mowad (2013). The Place of Nationality in Hegel's Philosophy of Politics and Religion: A Defense of Hegel on the Charges of Racism and National Chauvinism. In Angelica Nuzzo (ed.), Hegel on Religion and Politics. State University of New York Press 157.
    I analyze Hegel’s conception of nationality in order to make clear how he conceives the precise relation between the state and religion. This analysis also allows me to draw conclusions about whether Hegel can be considered racist or Eurocentric. My project involves understanding nationality as Hegel presents it in the anthropology: viz., as a form of spirit immersed in nature and closely related to geography. The geographical features of a nation’s land are reflected in its national religion; its (...)
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  30.  15
    Marc Slors & Nina Azari (2007). From Brain Imaging Religious Experience to Explaining Religion: A Critique. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):67-85.
    Recent functional neuroimaging data, acquired in studies of religious experience, have been used to explain and justify religion and its origins. In this paper, we critique the move from describing brain activity associated with self-reported religious states, to explaining why there is religion at all. Toward that end, first we review recent neuroimaging findings on religious experience, and show how those results do not necessarily support a popular notion that religion has a primitive evolutionary origin. Importantly, we (...)
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  31.  52
    Sami Pihlström (2007). Religion and Pseudo-Religion: An Elusive Boundary. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (1):3 - 32.
    This paper examines the possibility of setting a boundary between religion and “pseudo-religion” (or superstition). Philosophers of religion inspired by Ludwig Wittgenstein’s ideas, in particular, insist that religious language-use can be neither legitimated nor criticized from the perspective of non-religious language-games. Thus, for example, the “theodicist” requirement that the existence of evil should be theoretically reconciled with theism can be argued to be pseudo-religious (superstitious). Another example discussed in the paper is the relation between religion and (...)
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  32.  14
    James DiCenso (2015). Grace and Favor in Kant’s Ethical Explication of Religion. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 78 (1):29-51.
    This paper discusses Kant’s assessment of the religious idea of grace in relation to autonomous ethical practice. Following Kant’s own explanation of his methods and goals in interpreting religious ideas, my focus is on the ethical import of inherited religious concepts for human beings, rather than on literal theological dogmas concerning supernatural matters. I focus on how Kant’s inquiry into the ethical significance of the idea of grace is intertwined with another less recognized concept, that of favor. The latter concept (...)
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  33.  35
    Mikel Burley (2012). D. Z. Phillips' Contemplations on Religion and Literature. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 71 (1):21-37.
    This paper critically discusses D. Z. Phillips’ use of literary works as a resource for philosophical reflection on religion. Beginning by noting Phillips’ suggestion, made in relation to Waiting for Godot , that the possibilities of meaning that we see in a literary work can reveal something of our own religious sensibility, I then proceed to show what we learn about Phillips from his readings of certain works by Larkin, Tennyson, and Wharton. Through exploring alternative possible readings, I argue (...)
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  34.  12
    Nina P. Azari & Marc Slors (2007). From Brain Imaging Religious Experience to Explaining Religion: A Critique. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 29 (1):67-85.
    Recent functional neuroimaging data, acquired in studies of religious experience, have been used to explain and justify religion and its origins. In this paper, we critique the move from describing brain activity associated with self-reported religious states, to explaining why there is religion at all. Toward that end, first we review recent neuroimaging findings on religious experience, and show how those results do not necessarily support a popular notion that religion has a primitive evolutionary origin. Importantly, we (...)
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  35.  8
    D. Z. Phillips & Timothy Tessin (eds.) (2001). Philosophy of Religion in the 21st Century. Palgrave.
    This book offers the rare opportunity to assess, within a single volume, the leading schools of thought in the contemporary philosophy of religion. With contributions by well-known exponents of each school, the book is an ideal text for assessing the deep proximities and divisions which characterize contemporary philosophy of religion. The schools of thought represented include philosophical theism, Reformed epistemology, Wittgensteinianism, Postmodernism, Critical Theory, and Process Thought.
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  36.  10
    Valerie DeMarinis (2008). The Impact of Postmodernization on Existential Health in Sweden: Psychology of Religion's Function in Existential Public Health Analysis. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 30 (1):57-74.
    The article presents a portrait and analysis of the existential-psychocultural situation in postmodern Sweden. Drawing from recent research exploring psychology of religion and existential worldviews, and the Swedish findings from the international World Values Survey, an argument is made for thinking about existential function and dysfunction as public health issues. This is portrayed against the background of Sweden as one of the most secularized countries and simultaneously a country with one of the most encompassing welfare systems. Psychology of (...)'s updated role here would be to take responsibility for identifying and assessing the categories of function and dysfunction for an existential public health system. This role would also include the planning of policy for societal existential wellbeing, as well as planning prevention and intervention efforts for avoiding existential epidemiology. This new role fits well with public health's third revolution agenda focusing on health, wellbeing and quality of life. (shrink)
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  37.  27
    Ulf Zackariasson (2009). A Critique of Foundationalist Conceptions of Comprehensive Doctrines in the Religion in Politics-Debate. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 65 (1):11 - 28.
    This paper comprises a critical examination of foundationalist conceptions of comprehensive doctrines in the religion in politics-debate. I argue that John Rawls, the towering figure of this debate, operates with a foundationalist conception of comprehensive doctrines that has shaped the debate’s view of relevant alternatives (often referred to as exclusivism and inclusivism). However, there are several problems with foundationalist conceptions, and the most serious is that they are empirically inadequate in relation to modern Western societies. I conclude that participants (...)
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  38.  5
    Ian Fraser (2015). Charles Taylor, Mikhail Epstein and ‘Minimal Religion’. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 77 (2):159-178.
    In A Secular Age Charles Taylor endorses Mikhail Epstein’s notion of ‘minimal religion’ as his preferred orientation to the good for Western secular society. This article examines the basis of Epstein’s ‘minimal religion’ which rests on the psychoanalytic theories of Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung. It is shown that Freud’s theories are incompatible with Taylor’s own thought, and in the case of Jung, Epstein fails to develop the latter’s contribution to our understanding of religion. Moreover, although Taylor (...)
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  39.  3
    Jacob A. Belzen (2009). The Dynamics of Becoming a Psychologist of Religion: The Case of Heije Faber. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 31 (1):35-52.
    This paper offers a psychobiographical study of the connection between the life and work of Heije Faber , the internationally best known Dutch psychologist of religion. Initially, Faber studied theology, qualifying in philosophy of religion; in later years, he studied psychology . As a politically active pastor, he had to hide from the Nazi-occupation of The Netherlands during World War II. In 1970 he became the first professor of the psychology of religion at a Dutch theological faculty. (...)
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  40.  3
    Helmut K. Reich & Peter C. Hill (2008). Quo Vadis Psychology of Religion? Introduction to the Special Section. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 30 (1):5-18.
    After a brief review of the history of the psychology of religion and its nature, we introduce this special section by presenting various themes of ongoing research and pointing out differentially the desirability of continued efforts in these areas. We then assess the field, its growth, increased interdisciplinary opportunities, lesser marginalization, and improved research methodology but also the challenge of arriving at theoretical coherence, studying all types of religious and spiritual understanding and experience, and researching the richness and complexity (...)
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  41.  8
    Peter C. Hill & Nicholas J. S. Gibson (2008). Whither the Roots? Achieving Conceptual Depth in Psychology of Religion. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 30 (1):19-35.
    Should psychology of religion undergo a disciplinary renaissance and, if so, what might it look like? In this paper we explore that question by discussing the benefits of a better grounding of the field within mid-level theories from general psychology that provide it with greater conceptual depth. Such discussion will focus on three already existing and variously productive lines of research as case studies: attribution processes, attachment styles, and religious coping. These case studies represent lines of research at three (...)
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  42.  5
    Mustafa Koç (2012). Psychology of Religion in Turkey (1949–2012): An Overview. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 34 (3):327-340.
    This article aims to introduce, in brief, studies on psychology of religion in Turkey from 1949 to 2012 using literature survey methodology. The historical development of psychology of religion in the West will first be presented before focusing on the historical development of such studies in Turkey. Thereafter, the number of academic psychologists of religion in Turkey is listed. In addition, some information is given about journals, articles and academic dissertations covering scientific studies on the psychology of (...)
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  43.  8
    Helmut K. Reich (2008). Extending the Psychology of Religion: A Call for Exploration of Psychological Universals, More Inclusive Approaches, and Comprehensive Models. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 30 (1):115-134.
    Extensions of ongoing research identified in the introduction to this special issue are discussed here with farther reaching objectives: researching more intensely psychological universals thought to underlie religion, taking a more inclusive approach to psychology of religion, and constructing more comprehensive models. All three involve conscious experience, to which some observations are devoted. Remarks about the relationships between these research areas conclude the article.
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  44.  2
    Pehr Granqvist (2010). Religion as Attachment: The Godin Award Lecture. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 32 (1):5-24.
    In this presentation, I delineate five refinements that I and my associates have introduced during the last decade to the literature on religion and spirituality from an attachment-theory perspective. First, I describe the principle of social correspondence as an addition to the idea that religiousness reflects generalizing working models of attachment. Second, I focus on what we have learned from studying implicit processes and utilizing experimental designs in religion-as-attachment research. Third, I describe results from research projects that have (...)
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  45. Peter C. Hill & Nicholas J. S. Gibson (2008). Whither the Roots? Achieving Conceptual Depth in Psychology of Religion. Archive for the Psychology of Religion / Archiv für Religionspychologie 30 (1):19-35.
    Should psychology of religion undergo a disciplinary renaissance and, if so, what might it look like? In this paper we explore that question by discussing the benefits of a better grounding of the field within mid-level theories from general psychology that provide it with greater conceptual depth. Such discussion will focus on three already existing and variously productive lines of research as case studies: attribution processes, attachment styles, and religious coping. These case studies represent lines of research at three (...)
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  46. Helmut K. Reich & Peter C. Hill (2008). Quo Vadis Psychology of Religion? Introduction to the Special Section. Archive for the Psychology of Religion / Archiv für Religionspychologie 30 (1):5-18.
    After a brief review of the history of the psychology of religion and its nature, we introduce this special section by presenting various themes of ongoing research and pointing out differentially the desirability of continued efforts in these areas. We then assess the field, its growth, increased interdisciplinary opportunities, lesser marginalization, and improved research methodology but also the challenge of arriving at theoretical coherence, studying all types of religious and spiritual understanding and experience, and researching the richness and complexity (...)
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  47. Michaela Rehm (2008). Keine Politik ohne Moral, keine Moral ohne Religion? In Mathias Hildebrandt & Manfred Brocker (eds.), Der Begriff der Religion. VS Verlag 59-80.
    The paper offers a systematic analysis of the phenomenon of civil religion. It reconstructs its historical preconditions and explains that civil religion is advocated when a pluralist society seems about to lose a traditional religion or ideology perceived as former guarantor of social stability. Civil religion is then propagated as a means to create a new equilibrium. The text aims to clarify that this notion is based on the idea that morality depends on religion. The (...)
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  48. Yi-fu Tuan (2009). Religion: From Place to Placelessness. Distributed by the University of Chicago Press.
    Geography and religion -- Landscape of anxiety and fear -- Chinese cosmic space and places -- European sacred space and places -- A comparison with American Indian world-view -- Similar, yet different -- Apartness -- Order -- Wholeness and completion -- Sacred state -- Violence -- Ironies of piety -- God and morality -- From amoral energy to power for good -- Rise and fall of place specificity -- Traders and pilgrims -- Religious geography; or just human geography -- (...)
     
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  49.  35
    William J. Wainwright (ed.) (2004). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press.
    The philosophy of religion as a distinct discipline is an innovation of the last two hundred years, but its central topics--the existence and nature of the divine, humankind's relation to it, the nature of religion and its place in human life--have been with us since the inception of philosophy. Philosophers have long critically examined the truth of (and rational justification for) religious claims, and have explored such philosophically interesting phenomena as faith, religious experience and the distinctive features of (...)
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    Jacques Derrida (2002). Acts of Religion. Routledge.
    Is there, today," asks Jacques Derrida, "another 'question of religion'?" Derrida's writings on religion situate and raise anew questions of tradition, faith, and sacredness and their relation to philosophy and political culture. He has amply testified to his growing up in an Algerian Jewish, French-speaking family, to the complex impact of a certain Christianity on his surroundings and himself, and to his being deeply affected by religious persecution. Religion has made demands on Derrida, and, in turn, the (...)
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