Search results for 'Religious life Islam' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Hajer Ben Hadj Salem (2010). Beyond Herberg: An Islamic Perspective On Religious Pluralism In The Usa After 9/11. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (11):3-16.score: 264.0
    The history of America’s openness to immigration from diverse regions has advanced the course of religious pluralism. Many religious groups existed in America, yet only a few were publicly significant in advancing the course of pluralism from tolerance of differences to inclusion and participation. Their public significance was contingent upon their ability to help develop models of religious pluralism. Such models reflect structures that evolved as a result of attempts to formulate responses to diversity and to assert (...)
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  2. G. S. H. Marshall (1960). A Comparison of Islam and Christianity as Frame Work for Religious Life. Diogenes 8 (32):49-74.score: 261.0
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  3. Muḥammad T̤āhirulqādrī (1986). Islamic Philosophy of Human Life. Idara Minhaj-Ul-Quran.score: 234.0
     
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  4. Mohammed Ghaly (2012). The Beginning of Human Life: Islamic Bioethical Perspectives. Zygon 47 (1):175-213.score: 225.0
    Abstract. In January 1985, about 80 Muslim religious scholars and biomedical scientists gathered in a symposium held in Kuwait to discuss the broad question “When does human life begin?” This article argues that this symposium is one of the milestones in the field of contemporary Islamic bioethics and independent legal reasoning (Ijtihād). The proceedings of the symposium, however, escaped the attention of academic researchers. This article is meant to fill in this research lacuna by analyzing the proceedings of (...)
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  5. Syed Ameer Ali (1970). The Ethics of Islam. [Karachi]Umma Pub. House.score: 207.0
    THIS little work embodies the substance of a lecture delivered to the Society for the Higher Training of Youths, and forms a mere attempt towards the exposition ...
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  6. Abdul Malik Mujahid (2006). Sunahre Aurāq: Tārīk̲h̲-I Islām Se Camakte Damakte Vaqiʻāt. Dārussalām.score: 207.0
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  7. Ali Ünal (2009). Living the Ethics and Morality of Islam. Tughra Books.score: 207.0
     
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  8. Muḥammad Ḥanīf Rāme (2005). Islām Kī Ruḥānī Qadren̲: Maut Nahīn, Zindagī. Sang-I Mīl Pablikeshanz.score: 207.0
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  9. M. A. Cook (2000). Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought. Cambridge University Press.score: 198.0
    What kind of duty do we have to try to stop other people doing wrong? The question is intelligible in just about any culture, but few of them seek to answer it in a rigorous fashion. The most striking exception is found in the Islamic tradition, where 'commanding right' and 'forbidding wrong' is a central moral tenet already mentioned in the Koran. As an historian of Islam whose research has ranged widely over space and time, Michael Cook is well (...)
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  10. Talip Küçükcan (2010). Multidimensional Approach to Religion: A Way of Looking at Religious Phenomena. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (10):60-70.score: 198.0
    Modern societies have by nature a corrosive effect on traditional forms of religious life and lead to decline in the scope and influence of religious institutions and in the popularity of religious beliefs. This article argues that prophecies of traditional secularization theory failed to predict the future of religion in the contemporary world. Although modernity caused a degree of rupture between religion and society, there has also been a global revival of religion in the last two (...)
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  11. Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde (2014). The Moral Code in Islam and Organ Donation in Western Countries: Reinterpreting Religious Scriptures to Meet Utilitarian Medical Objectives. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9 (1):11.score: 195.0
    End-of-life organ donation is controversial in Islam. The controversy stems from: (1) scientifically flawed medical criteria of death determination; (2) invasive perimortem procedures for preserving transplantable organs; and (3) incomplete disclosure of information to consenting donors and families. Data from a survey of Muslims residing in Western countries have shown that the interpretation of religious scriptures and advice of faith leaders were major barriers to willingness for organ donation. Transplant advocates have proposed corrective interventions: (1) reinterpreting (...) scriptures, (2) reeducating faith leaders, and (3) utilizing media campaigns to overcome religious barriers in Muslim communities. This proposal disregards the intensifying scientific, legal, and ethical controversies in Western societies about the medical criteria of death determination in donors. It would also violate the dignity and inviolability of human life which are pertinent values incorporated in the Islamic moral code. Reinterpreting religious scriptures to serve the utilitarian objectives of a controversial end-of-life practice, perceived to be socially desirable, transgresses the Islamic moral code. It may also have deleterious practical consequences, as donors can suffer harm before death. The negative normative consequences of utilitarian secular moral reasoning reset the Islamic moral code upholding the sanctity and dignity of human life. (shrink)
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  12. Mona Siddiqui (2012). The Good Muslim: Reflections on Classical Islamic Law and Theology. Cambridge University Press.score: 192.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Spoken, intended and problematic divorce in Hanafi Fiqh; 2. Between person and property - slavery in Qudūrī's Mukhtasar; 3. Pig, purity and permission in Mālikī slaughter; 4. Islamic and other perspectives on evil; 5. The language of love in the Qur'ān; 6. Virtue and limits in the ethics of friendship 7. Drinking and drunkenness in Ibn Rushd.
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  13. Alison Shaw (2012). 'They Say Islam has a Solution for Everything, so Why Are There No Guidelines for This?' Ethical Dilemmas Associated with the Births and Deaths of Infants with Fatal Abnormalities From a Small Sample of Pakistani Muslim Couples in Britain. Bioethics 26 (9):485-492.score: 180.0
    This paper presents ethical dilemmas concerning the termination of pregnancy, the management of childbirth, and the withdrawal of life-support from infants in special care, for a small sample of British Pakistani Muslim parents of babies diagnosed with fatal abnormalities. Case studies illustrating these dilemmas are taken from a qualitative study of 66 families of Pakistani origin referred to a genetics clinic in Southern England. The paper shows how parents negotiated between the authoritative knowledge of their doctors, religious experts, (...)
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  14. Rahmat Abdullah (2008). Warisan Sang Murabbi: Pilar-Pilar Asasi. Tarbawi Press.score: 180.0
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  15. Amturrafīq Ẓaffar (2004). Ādāb-I Ḥayāt. Shuʻbah-Yi Ishāʻat Lajnah ImāʼIllāh.score: 180.0
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  16. Faḍl Allāh & Muḥammad Ḥasan (2004). Rawḍ Al-Ṣāliḥīn. Dār Al-Madá.score: 180.0
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  17. Mirzo Aḣmadov (uuuu). Nasri Akhloqī Badeii Ḣusaĭn Voizi Koshifī. Vazorati Maorifi Jumḣurii Tojikiston.score: 180.0
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  18. Abū al-Mukhtār Muḥammad ʻAbd al-Raʼ Ḥaqyār & ūf (2007). Afz̤al Al-Ḥikāyāt. Maktabah-Yi Qāsimiyah.score: 180.0
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  19. Abū al-Mukhtār Muḥammad ʻAbd al-Raʼūf Ḥaqyār (2007). Afz̤al Al-Ḥikāyāt. Maktabah-Yi Qāsimiyah.score: 180.0
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  20. Abūlḥasan Bārahbankvī (2004). Irshādāt-I Madanī. Milne Kā Patah, Maktabah-Yi Buk̲h̲ārī.score: 180.0
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  21. Ghazzālī (2008). Kimiëi Saodat. Er-Graf.score: 180.0
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  22. Ghazzālī (2008). Ėḣëu Ulumi-D-Din. Ėr-Graf.score: 180.0
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  23. Muḥammad Ismāʻīl Shafīq Ghoṭkī (2005). Qurʼān Aur Ṣāhib-I Qurʼān. Mushtāq Buk Karnar.score: 180.0
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  24. Mụhammad Manṣūrruzamān̲ Ṣiddīqī (2004). Islāmī Ādāb-I Zindagī. Milne Ke Pate, Ṣiddīiqī Ṭrasṭ.score: 180.0
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  25. Ḥusayn Vāʻiẓ Kāshifī (2005). Āk̲h̲lāq-I Muḥsinī: Mutarjam. Prākrit Bhārtī Akādmī.score: 180.0
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  26. Umm-I. ʻAbd-I. Munīb (2004). Ashiyāʼe Z̤urūrat Kā Islāmī Miʻyār. Mashribah-Yi ʻilm o Ḥikmat.score: 180.0
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  27. Muḥammad Hārūn Muʻāviyah (2006). Iṣlāḥ-I Muʻāsharah Ke Rahnumā Uṣūl: Muʻāshare Kī Iṣlāḥ Ke Liʼe Z̤arūrī Aur Bihtarīn Uṣūlon̲ Kā Ek Nafīs Majmūʻah. Amrīkah Men̲ Milne [Kā Patah], Darul-Uloom Al-Madania.score: 180.0
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  28. Zulfiqār Aḥmad Naqshbandī (2008). Ahl-I Dil Ke Taṛpā Dene Vāle Vāqiʻāt. Milne [Kā Patā], Maktabah Al-ʻarab.score: 180.0
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  29. Tavfiq Rifoʺī (2008). Niḣolḣoi Nekī. [S.N.].score: 180.0
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  30. Muḥammad Kāmil Ḥusayn (1977). The Hallowed Valley: A Muslim Philosophy of Religion. American University in Cairo Press.score: 180.0
     
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  31. Muḥammad Taqī ʻUs̲mānī (1993). Easy Good Deeds. Distributors, Bait-Ul-Quran.score: 180.0
     
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  32. Emrullah Yüksel (2011). Mehmed Birgivî'nin (929-981/1523-1573) Dinî Ve Siyasî Görüşleri. Türkiye Diyanet Vakfı.score: 180.0
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  33. Ṣalāḥuddīn Yūsuf (2005). Islāmī Muʻāshirat. Dārussalām.score: 180.0
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  34. Sami Alsolamy (2014). Islamic Views on Artificial Nutrition and Hydration in Terminally Ill Patients. Bioethics 28 (2):96-99.score: 162.0
    Withholding and withdrawing artificial nutrition and hydration from terminally ill patients poses many ethical challenges. The literature provides little information about the Islamic beliefs, attitudes, and laws related to these challenges. Artificial nutrition and hydration may be futile and reduce quality of life. They can also harm the terminally ill patient because of complications such as aspiration pneumonia, dyspnea, nausea, diarrhea, and hypervolemia. From the perspective of Islam, rules governing the care of terminally ill patients are derived from (...)
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  35. Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde (2013). Brain-Dead Patients Are Not Cadavers: The Need to Revise the Definition of Death in Muslim Communities. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (1):25-45.score: 153.0
    The utilitarian construct of two alternative criteria of human death increases the supply of transplantable organs at the end of life. Neither the neurological criterion (heart-beating donation) nor the circulatory criterion (non-heart-beating donation) is grounded in scientific evidence but based on philosophical reasoning. A utilitarian death definition can have unintended consequences for dying Muslim patients: (1) the expedited process of determining death for retrieval of transplantable organs can lead to diagnostic errors, (2) the equivalence of brain death with human (...)
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  36. Bala S. K. Saho (2011). Islam and Personhood in the Senegambia: Life and Times of Seringne Mass Kah, 1827-1936. Mangroves.score: 148.0
     
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  37. R. D. Orr & L. B. Genesen (1997). Requests for "Inappropriate" Treatment Based on Religious Beliefs. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):142-147.score: 147.0
    Requests by patients or their families for treatment which the patient's physician considers to be "inappropriate" are becoming more frequent than refusals of treatment which the physician considers appropriate. Such requests are often based on the patient's religious beliefs about the attributes of God (sovereignty, omnipotence), the attributes of persons (sanctity of life), or the individual's personal relationship with God (communication, commands, etc). We present four such cases and discuss some of the basic religious tenets of the (...)
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  38. Sandu Frunza (2010). Ron Geaves, Religious Studies, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Chrisrianity, Islam. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 6 (16):174-176.score: 144.0
    Ron Geaves, Religious Studies, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism, Chrisrianity, Islam The Continuum International Publishing Group, New York, 2006.
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  39. A. R. Muhammad (2010). Akulturasi Nilai-Nilai Persaudaraan Islam Model Dayah Aceh. Kementerian Agama Ri, Badan Litbang Dan Diklat, Puslitbang Lektur Keagamaan.score: 133.0
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  40. Shaikh Mohd Saifuddeen, Noor Naemah Abdul Rahman, Noor Munirah Isa & Azizan Baharuddin (2014). Maqasid Al-Shariah as a Complementary Framework to Conventional Bioethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 20 (2):317-327.score: 120.0
    With the rapid advancements made in biotechnology, bioethical discourse has become increasingly important. Bioethics is a multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary field that goes beyond the realm of natural sciences, and has involved fields in the domain of the social sciences. One of the important areas in bioethical discourse is religion. In a country like Malaysia, where Muslims make up the majority of the population, Islam plays a crucial role in providing the essential guidelines on the permissibility and acceptability of biotechnological (...)
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  41. Marcia J. Bunge (ed.) (2012). Children, Adults, and Shared Responsibilities: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Perspectives. Cambridge University Press.score: 120.0
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction Marcia J. Bunge; Part I. Religious Understandings of Children and Obligations to Them: Central Beliefs and Practices: 1. The concept of the child embedded in Jewish law Elliot N. Dorff; 2. Children's spirituality in the Jewish narrative tradition Sandy Eisenberg Sasso; 3. Christian understandings of children and obligations to them: central Biblical themes and resources Marcia J. Bunge; 4. Human dignity and social responsibility: Catholic Social Thought on children William Werpehowski; 5. Islam, children, (...)
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  42. Émile Durkheim (1926). The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life. New York, the Macmillan Company.score: 112.0
    In The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (1912), Emile Durkheim sets himself the task of discovering the enduring source of human social identity.
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  43. Mary Cresp (2012). Australian Religious Life Since Vatican II: A Personal Journey. Australasian Catholic Record, The 89 (4):458.score: 112.0
    Cresp, Mary Some months ago while driving I heard an interview with writer Alan Moore on the radio and was so captured by his comments about trends in modern society that I had to pull over to the side of the road and stop to concentrate on what he was saying. I ordered his book, No Straight Lines, and found he presents an inspiring plea for a more human-centric world, more able organisations and more vibrant and equitable economies relevant to (...)
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  44. Muḥammad Bihishtī (1982). Philosophy of Islam. Islamic Publications.score: 111.0
     
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  45. C. J. Arthur (1986). Ineffability and Intelligibility: Towards an Understanding of the Radical Unlikeness of Religious Experience. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (2/3):109 - 129.score: 108.0
    I do not for a moment question the fact that many people have experiences of a special type which may be termed “religious”, The extent to which religious experience may be regarded as a reasonably common phenomenon in present-day Britain is shown clearly by David Hay in his Exploring Inner Space, Harmondsworth 1982. that such experiences often involve reference to something which appears to display a radical unlikeness to all else and that they are therefore in some sense (...)
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  46. M. Pacaci (2013). Democratic Values and the Qur'an as a Source of Islam. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (4-5):361-371.score: 108.0
    It would be an anachronism to search for modern democracy in the Qur’an that is the first among the other sources of Islam, i.e. Sunnah, ijma and the qiyas. To deduce the definition of Islam merely on the basis of the primary and secondary textual sources rather than the application of them as Muslim praxis would be an incomplete hermeneutic process in understanding it. We can see that the state and the religious society, which was represented by (...)
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  47. Hamdan Al-Jahdali, Salim Baharoon, Abdullah Al Sayyari & Ghiath Al-Ahmad (2013). Advance Medical Directives: A Proposed New Approach and Terminology From an Islamic Perspective. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):163-169.score: 108.0
    Advance directives are specific competent consumers’ wishes about future medical plans in the event that they become incompetent. Awareness of a patient’s autonomy particularly, in relation to their right to refuse or withdraw treatment, a right for the patient to die from natural causes and interest in end of life issues were among the main reasons for developing and legalizing advance medical directives in developed countries. However, in many circumstances cultural and religious aspects are among many factors that (...)
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  48. Sherine Hamdy (2013). Not Quite Dead: Why Egyptian Doctors Refuse the Diagnosis of Death by Neurological Criteria. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):147-160.score: 108.0
    Drawing on two years of ethnographic fieldwork in Egypt focused on organ transplantation, this paper examines the ways in which the “scientific” criteria of determining death in terms of brain function are contested by Egyptian doctors. Whereas in North American medical practice, the death of the “person” is associated with the cessation of brain function, in Egypt, any sign of biological life is evidence of the persistence, even if fleeting, of the soul. I argue that this difference does not (...)
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  49. Paul L. Heck (2006). The Crisis of Knowledge in Islam (I): The Case of Al-'Amiri. Philosophy East and West 56 (1):106-135.score: 108.0
    : Skepticism as doubts about religious knowledge played a significant role in the intellectual reflection of the fourth and fifth Islamic centuries (tenth and eleventh centuries c.e.), a period of considerable plurality within Islam on many levels. Such skepticism was directed at revealed knowledge that spelled out the customs and norms (i.e., laws) particular to the Islamic way of life (religio-moral knowledge). Doubts were pushed by (1) theologians who, themselves caught within a web of "parity of evidence" (...)
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  50. N. Gole (2011). The Public Visibility of Islam and European Politics of Resentment: The Minarets-Mosques Debate. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (4):383-392.score: 108.0
    The public visibility of Islam reveals new political stakes in European democracies around issues of immigration and citizenship. By focusing on the societal debates and the controversies around the construction of mosques and minarets, this article explores the ways in which Islamic difference is manifested, perceived and framed in public life. The ‘visibility’ of Islam in public is conceptualized as a form of agency, a manifestation of religious difference that cannot be thought independent of the materiality (...)
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