Search results for 'Remembering' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Edward S. Casey (1987). Remembering: A Phenomenological Study. Indiana University Press.score: 18.0
    Edward S. Casey provides a thorough description of the varieties of human memory, including recognizing and reminding, reminiscing and commemorating, body memory and place memory. The preface to the new edition extends the scope of the original text to include issues of collective memory, forgetting, and traumatic memory, and aligns this book with Casey's newest work on place and space. This ambitious study demonstrates that nothing in our lives is unaffected by remembering.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Josef Perner, Daniela Kloo & Elisabeth Stöttinger (2007). Introspection & Remembering. Synthese 159 (2):253 - 270.score: 18.0
    We argue that episodic remembering, understood as the ability to re-experience past events, requires a particular kind of introspective ability and understanding. It requires the understanding that first person experiences can represent actual events. In this respect it differs from the understanding required by the traditional false belief test for children, where a third person attribution (to others or self) of a behavior governing representation is sufficient. The understanding of first person experiences as representations is also required for problem (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Saul Traiger (1978). Some Remarks on Lehrer and Richard's 'Remembering Without Knowing'. Grazer Philosophische Studien 6:107-111.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the four counterexamples offered by Lehrer and Richard in 'Remembering Without Knowing'. The analysis which Lehrer and Richard's purported counterexamples attempt to discredit is that remembering p requires knowing that p and believing that p. The counterexamples are considered individually and all are rejected as counterexamples to knowing as a necessary condition of remembering.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Felipe De Brigard (2013). Is Memory for Remembering? Recollection as a Form of Episodic Hypothetical Thinking. Synthese 191 (2):1-31.score: 18.0
    Misremembering is a systematic and ordinary occurrence in our daily lives. Since it is commonly assumed that the function of memory is to remember the past, misremembering is typically thought to happen because our memory system malfunctions. In this paper I argue that not all cases of misremembering are due to failures in our memory system. In particular, I argue that many ordinary cases of misremembering should not be seen as instances of memory’s malfunction, but rather as the normal result (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Keith Lehrer & Joseph Richard (1975). Remembering Without Knowing. Grazer Philosophische Studien 1:121-126.score: 18.0
    Memory sometimes yields knowledge and sometimes does not. It is, however, natural to suppose that i f a man remembers that p, then he knows that p and formerly knew that p. Remembering something is plausibly construed as a f o rm of knowing something which one has not forgotten and which one knew previously. We argue, to the contrary, that this thesis is false. We present four counterexamples to the thesis that support a different analysis of remembering. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. David Middleton & Kyoko Murakami (2003). Collectivity and Agency in Remembering and Reconciliation. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 5 (1):16-30.score: 18.0
    This paper examines how British war veterans fold together war time and post war experiences in practices of remembering and reconciliation. We examine these practices as networks of association between British ex-servicemen (veterans) and the people, places and circumstances associated with their experiences as prisoners in Japan during WW2. We focus on the experience of World War 2 British ex-servicemen (veterans) who were prisoners of war in Far East. During their period of captivity they worked to build Thai-Burma Railway (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Andrew Moon (2013). Remembering Entails Knowing. Synthese 190 (14):2717-2729.score: 16.0
    In his recent book, Bernecker (Memory, 2010) has attacked the following prominent view: (RK) S remembers that p only if S knows that p. An attack on RK is also an attack on Timothy Williamson’s view that knowledge is the most general factive stative attitude. In this paper, I defend RK against Bernecker’s attacks and also advance new arguments in favor of it. In Sect. 2, I provide some background on memory. In Sect 3, I respond to Bernecker’s attacks on (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. C. B. Martin & Max Deutscher (1966). Remembering. Philosophical Review 75 (April):161-96.score: 15.0
  9. B. S. Benjamin (1956). Remembering. Mind 65 (July):312-331.score: 15.0
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Edward S. Casey (1979). Perceiving and Remembering. Review of Metaphysics 32 (March):407-436.score: 15.0
  11. Edward S. Casey (1977). Imagining and Remembering. Review of Metaphysics 31 (December):187-209.score: 15.0
  12. David F. Haight & M. R. Haight (1989). Time, Memory, and Self-Remembering. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 3 (1):1-11.score: 15.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Anthony J. Cascardi (1984). Remembering. Review of Metaphysics 38 (December):275-302.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Richard K. Scheer (1979). Margolis on Remembering. Mind 88 (April):280-281.score: 15.0
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. S. Jack Odell (1971). Malcolm on 'Remembering That'. Mind 80 (October):593.score: 15.0
  16. Linda J. Hayes (1998). Remembering as a Psychological Event. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 18 (2):135-143.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Max Deutscher (1989). Remembering "Remembering". In John Heil (ed.), Identity, Cause, and Mind. Kluwer.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Hugh J. Silverman (1978). Imagining, Perceiving, and Remembering. Humanitas 14 (May):197-207.score: 15.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. W. von Leyden (1961). Remembering: A Philosophical Problem. Philosophical Library.score: 15.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Addison E. Woodward & Robert A. Bjork (1971). Forgetting and Remembering in Free Recall: Intentional and Unintentional. Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (1):109.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Douwe B. Yntema & Gayle E. Mueser (1960). Remembering the Present States of a Number of Variables. Journal of Experimental Psychology 60 (1):18.score: 15.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. John Sutton, Celia B. Harris, Paul G. Keil & Amanda J. Barnier (2010). The Psychology of Memory, Extended Cognition, and Socially Distributed Remembering. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):521-560.score: 12.0
    This paper introduces a new, expanded range of relevant cognitive psychological research on collaborative recall and social memory to the philosophical debate on extended and distributed cognition. We start by examining the case for extended cognition based on the complementarity of inner and outer resources, by which neural, bodily, social, and environmental resources with disparate but complementary properties are integrated into hybrid cognitive systems, transforming or augmenting the nature of remembering or decision-making. Adams and Aizawa, noting this distinctive complementarity (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. John Sutton & Kellie Williamson (forthcoming). Embodied Remembering. In L. Shapiro (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Experiences of embodied remembering are familiar and diverse. We settle bodily into familiar chairs or find our way easily round familiar rooms. We inhabit our own kitchens or cars or workspaces effectively and comfortably, and feel disrupted when our habitual and accustomed objects or technologies change or break or are not available. Hearing a particular song can viscerally bring back either one conversation long ago, or just the urge to dance. Some people explicitly use their bodies to record, store, (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. John Sutton (2009). Remembering. In P. Robbins & M. Aydede (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge UP.score: 12.0
    The case of remembering poses a particular challenge to theories of situated cognition, and its successful treatment within this framework will require a more dramatic integration of levels, fields, and methods than has yet been achieved. 1. Introduction: the interdisciplinary framework 2. Remembering as constructive activity and interpersonal skill 3. Remembering as social interaction and joint attention to the past 4. Shared remembering 5. Distributed cognition and exograms 6. Conclusion.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. William Day (2011). I Don't Know, Just Wait: Remembering Remarriage in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. In David LaRocca (ed.), The Philosophy of Charlie Kaufman. University Press of Kentucky.score: 12.0
    "In 'I Don't Know, Just Wait: Remembering Remarriage in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind', William Day shows how Kaufman's Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind should be considered part of the film genre known as remarriage comedy; but he also shows how Kaufman contributes something new to the genre. Day addresses, in particular, how the conversation that is the condition for reunion involves discovering 'what it means to have memories together as a way of learning how to be (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Celia B. Harris, John Sutton, Paul Keil & Amanda Barnier, Collaborative Remembering: When Can Remembering With Others Be Beneficial?score: 12.0
    Experimental memory research has traditionally focused on the individual, and viewed social influence as a source of error or inhibition. However, in everyday life, remembering is often a social activity, and theories from philosophy and psychology predict benefits of shared remembering. In a series of studies, both experimental and more qualitative, we attempted to bridge this gap by examining the effects of collaboration on memory in a variety of situations and in a variety of groups. We discuss our (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Andrew Naylor (1986). Remembering Without Knowing — Not Without Justification. Philosophical Studies 49 (3):295 - 311.score: 12.0
    K. Lehrer and J. Richard’s analysis of remembering that p is shown to be deficient, particularly because it fails to treat factual memory as an epistemic concept. Adding a requirement concerning the subject’s past justification accommodates instances of factual memory without factual knowledge, helps explain the role of justification in remembering that p, and strengthens the analysis against certain counterexamples. The paper includes an assessment of A. Cusmariu;s definition of impure memory.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Kellie Williamson & John Sutton (forthcoming). Embodied Remembering. In L. Shapiro (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge.score: 12.0
    Experiences of embodied remembering are familiar and diverse. We settle bodily into familiar chairs or find our way easily round familiar rooms. We inhabit our own kitchens or cars or workspaces effectively and comfortably, and feel disrupted when our habitual and accustomed objects or technologies change or break or are not available. Hearing a particular song can viscerally bring back either one conversation long ago, or just the urge to dance. Some people explicitly use their bodies to record, store, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. John C. Trueswell & Anna Papafragou, Perceiving and Remembering Events Cross-Linguistically: Evidence From Dual-Task Paradigms.score: 12.0
    What role does language play during attention allocation in perceiving and remembering events? We recorded adults‟ eye movements as they studied animated motion events for a later recognition task. We compared native speakers of two languages that use different means of expressing motion (Greek and English). In Experiment 1, eye movements revealed that, when event encoding was made difficult by requiring a concurrent task that did not involve language (tapping), participants spent extra time studying what their language treats as (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Celia B. Harris, Paul Keil, John Sutton, Amanda Barnier & Doris McIlwain (2011). We Remember, We Forget: Collaborative Remembering in Older Couples. Discourse Processes 48 (4):267-303.score: 12.0
    Transactive memory theory describes the processes by which benefits for memory can occur when remembering is shared in dyads or groups. In contrast, cognitive psychology experiments demonstrate that social influences on memory disrupt and inhibit individual recall. However, most research in cognitive psychology has focused on groups of strangers recalling relatively meaningless stimuli. In the current study, we examined social influences on memory in groups with a shared history, who were recalling a range of stimuli, from word lists to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Nils Dahlbäck, Mattias Kristiansson & Fredrik Stjernberg (2013). Distributed Remembering Through Active Structuring of Activities and Environments. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (1):153-165.score: 12.0
    In this paper, we consider a few actual cases of mnemonic strategies among older subjects (older than 65). The cases are taken from an ethnographic study, examining how elderly adults cope with cognitive decline. We believe that these cases illustrate that the process of remembering in many cases involve a complex distributed web of processes involving both internal or intracranial and external sources. Our cases illustrate that the nature of distributed remembering is shaped by and subordinated to the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Martin M. Fagin, Jeremy K. Yamashiro & William C. Hirst (2013). The Adaptive Function of Distributed Remembering: Contributions to the Formation of Collective Memory. [REVIEW] Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (1):91-106.score: 12.0
    Empirical research has increasingly turned its attention to distributed cognition. Acts of remembering are embedded in a social, interactional context; cognitive labor is divided between a rememberer and external sources. The present article examines the benefits and costs associated with distributed, collaborative, conversational remembering. Further, we examine the consequences of joint acts of remembering on subsequent individual acts of remembering. Here, we focus on influences on memory through social contagion and socially shared retrieval-induced forgetting. Extending beyond (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. John Sutton (2009). Extended and Constructive Remembering: Two Notes on Martin and Deutscher. Crossroads: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Study of History, Philosophy, Religion, and Classics 4 (1):79-91.score: 12.0
    Martin and Deutscher’s remarkable 1966 paper ‘Remembering’ still offers great riches to memory researchers across distinctive traditions, both in its methodological ambition (successfully marrying phenomenological and causal discourses) and in its content. In this short discussion, after briefly setting the paper in its context, we hone in on two live and under-explored issues which have gained attention recently under new labels – the extended mind hypothesis, and the constructive nature of memory. We suggest that Martin and Deutscher’s causal analysis (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Paul Vitányi (2011). Remembering Kolmogorov. Metascience 20 (3):509-511.score: 12.0
    Remembering Kolmogorov Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9540-6 Authors Paul M. B. Vitányi, CWI, Science Park 123, 1098 XG Amsterdam, The Netherlands Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
    No categories
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Chris Yuill (2011). Forgetting and Remembering Alienation Theory. History of the Human Sciences 24 (2):103-119.score: 12.0
    Alienation theory has acted as the stimulus for a great deal of research and writing in the history of sociology. It has formed the basis of many sociological ‘classics’ focused on the workplace and the experiences of workers, and has also been mobilized to chart wider social malaise and individual troubles. Alienation theory usage has, however, declined significantly since its heyday of the 1960s and 1970s. Here, the reasons why alienation theory was ‘forgotten’ and what can be gained by ‘ (...)’ alienation theory are explored. To realize this ambition this article proceeds by (1) briefly visiting differing definitions of alienation theory, before charting its high point, and the various debates and tensions of the time, during the 1960s and 1970s; (2) analysing the reasons why alienation theory fell from grace from the 1980s onwards; (3) elaborating how and why alienation theory is still relevant for sociology and the wider social sciences today. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Craig R. Barclay (1996). Autobiographical Remembering: Narrative Constraints on Objectified Selves. In David C. Rubin (ed.), Remembering Our Past: Studies in Autobiographical Memory. Cambridge University Press. 94--125.score: 12.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Lauren Haaftern-Schick & Sura Levine (2011). Remembering Robert Seydel. Continent 1 (2):141-144.score: 12.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 141-144. This January, while preparing a new course, Robert Seydel was struck and killed by an unexpected heart attack. He was a critically under-appreciated artist and one of the most beloved and admired professors at Hampshire College. At the time of his passing, Seydel was on the brink of a major artistic and career milestone. His Book of Ruth was being prepared for publication by Siglio Press. His publisher describes the book as: “an alchemical assemblage that composes (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Christine M. Koggel (2014). Relational Remembering and Oppression. Hypatia 29 (2):493-508.score: 12.0
    This paper begins by discussing Sue Campbell's account of memory as she first developed it in Relational Remembering: Rethinking the Memory Wars and applied it to the context of the false memory debates. In more recent work, Campbell was working on expanding her account of relational remembering from an analysis of personal rememberings to activities of public rememberings in contexts of historic harms and, specifically, harms to Aboriginals and their communities in Canada. The goal of this paper is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Jordi Fernandez (2006). Memory and Perception: Remembering Snowflake. Theoria 21 (56):147-164.score: 10.0
    If I remember something, I tend to believe that I have perceived it. Similarly, if I remember something, I tend to believe that it happened in the past. My aim here is to propose a notion of mnemonic contentaccounts for these facts. Certain proposals build perceptual experiences into the content of memories. I argue that they Have trouble with the second belief. Other proposals build references to temporal locations into mnemonic content. I argue that they have trouble with the second (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. John M. Gardiner, C. Ramponi & A. Richardson-Klavehn (1998). Experiences of Remembering, Knowing, and Guessing. Consciousness and Cognition 7 (1):1-26.score: 10.0
    This article presents and discusses transcripts of some 270 explanations subjects provided subsequently for recognition memory decisions that had been associated with remember, know, or guess responses at the time the recognition decisions were made. Only transcripts for remember responses included reports of recollective experiences, which seemed mostly to reflect either effortful elaborative encoding or involuntary reminding at study, especially in relation to the self. Transcripts for know responses included claims of just knowing, and of feelings of familiarity. These transcripts (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Carol Gilligan (1998). Remembering Larry. Journal of Moral Education 27 (2):125-140.score: 10.0
    Abstract I am honoured that you asked me to give the Kohlberg Memorial Lecture and grateful for this occasion to remember Larry and speak about his work. For me, it means coming back into a conversation that I was intensely involved in a long time ago. I have not talked publicly about Larry or my relationship with him since the time of his death, and it has now been over 10 years. I want to say how I remember Larry and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Stanley Hauerwas (1995). Remembering Martin Luther King Jr. Remembering: A Response to Christopher Beem. Journal of Religious Ethics 23 (1):135 - 148.score: 10.0
    The question of the relation of my work to that of Martin Luther King Jr. cannot be resolved with the theoretical tools Christopher Beem brings to the task. Stanley Fish has written that "those who detach King's words from the history that produced them erase the fact of that history from the slate, and they do so, paradoxically, in order to prevent that history from being truly and deeply altered." The vice of liberalism is not selfishness so much as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Allen Dyer & Phil Mullins (2007). Remembering Doug Adams. Tradition and Discovery 34 (2):9-10.score: 10.0
    These brief reflections remember the late Doug Adams, Professor of Christianity and the Arts at Pacific School of Religion and Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Ronald L. Hall (2000). Remembering Bill Poteat. Tradition and Discovery 27 (3):11-15.score: 10.0
    This brief essay remembers the late William H. Poteat and outlines his intellectual perspective and its its roots.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Erica H. Wojcik (2013). Remembering New Words: Integrating Early Memory Development Into Word Learning. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 10.0
    In order to successfully acquire a new word, young children must learn the correct associations between labels and their referents. For decades, word-learning researchers have explored how young children are able to form these associations. However, in addition to learning label-referent mappings, children must also remember them. Despite the importance of memory processes in forming a stable lexicon, there has been little integration of early memory research into the study of early word learning. After discussing what we know about how (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Sven Bernecker (2007). Remembering Without Knowing. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (1):137 – 156.score: 9.0
    This paper challenges the standard conception of memory as a form of knowledge. Unlike knowledge, memory implies neither belief nor justification.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Andrew Naylor (2011). Remembering-That: Episodic Vs. Semantic. Philosophical Psychology 24 (3):317 - 322.score: 9.0
    In a paper ?The intentionality of memory,? Jordi Fernández (2006) proposes a way of distinguishing between episodic and semantic memory. I identify three difficulties with his proposal and provide a way of drawing the distinction that avoids these shortcomings.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Alan R. White (1989). As I Remember. Philosophical Quarterly 39 (January):94-97.score: 9.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Lindsay Judson & V. Karasmanēs (eds.) (2006). Remembering Socrates: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
    Lindsay Judson and Vassilis Karasmanis present a selection of philosophical papers by an outstanding international team of scholars, assessing the legacy and continuing relevance of Socrates's thought 2,400 years after his death. The topics of the papers include Socratic method; the notion of definition; Socrates's intellectualist conception of ethics; famous arguments in the Euthyphro and Crito; and aspects of the later portrayal and reception of Socrates as a philosophical and ethical exemplar, by Plato, the Sceptics, and in the early Christian (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000