Search results for 'Remembering' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  28
    Felipe De Brigard (2014). Is Memory for Remembering? Recollection as a Form of Episodic Hypothetical Thinking. Synthese 191 (2):1-31.
    Misremembering is a systematic and ordinary occurrence in our daily lives. Since it is commonly assumed that the function of memory is to remember the past, misremembering is typically thought to happen because our memory system malfunctions. In this paper I argue that not all cases of misremembering are due to failures in our memory system. In particular, I argue that many ordinary cases of misremembering should not be seen as instances of memory’s malfunction, but rather as the normal result (...)
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  2. Edward S. Casey (1987). Remembering: A Phenomenological Study. Indiana University Press.
    Edward S. Casey provides a thorough description of the varieties of human memory, including recognizing and reminding, reminiscing and commemorating, body memory and place memory. The preface to the new edition extends the scope of the original text to include issues of collective memory, forgetting, and traumatic memory, and aligns this book with Casey's newest work on place and space. This ambitious study demonstrates that nothing in our lives is unaffected by remembering.
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  3.  10
    Lucas M. Bietti & John Sutton (2015). Interacting to Remember at Multiple Timescales: Coordination, Collaboration, Cooperation and Culture in Joint Remembering. Interaction Studies 16 (3):419-450.
    Everyday joint remembering, from family remembering around the dinner table to team remembering in the operating theatre, relies on the successful interweaving of multiple cognitive, bodily, social and material resources, anchored in specific cultural ecosystems. Such systems for joint remembering in social interactions are composed of processes unfolding over multiple but complementary timescales, which we distinguish for analytic purposes so as better to study their interanimation in practice: (i) faster, lower-level coordination processes of behavioral matching and (...)
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  4.  62
    Josef Perner, Daniela Kloo & Elisabeth Stöttinger (2007). Introspection & Remembering. Synthese 159 (2):253 - 270.
    We argue that episodic remembering, understood as the ability to re-experience past events, requires a particular kind of introspective ability and understanding. It requires the understanding that first person experiences can represent actual events. In this respect it differs from the understanding required by the traditional false belief test for children, where a third person attribution (to others or self) of a behavior governing representation is sufficient. The understanding of first person experiences as representations is also required for problem (...)
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  5.  4
    Lucas M. Bietti & John Sutton (2015). Interacting to Remember at Multiple Timescales: Coordination, Collaboration, Cooperation and Culture in Joint Remembering. Interaction Studies 16 (3):419-450.
    Everyday joint remembering, from family remembering around the dinner table to team remembering in the operating theatre, relies on the successful interweaving of multiple cognitive, bodily, social and material resources, anchored in specific cultural ecosystems. Such systems for joint remembering in social interactions are composed of processes unfolding over multiple but complementary timescales, which we distinguish for analytic purposes so as better to study their interanimation in practice: (i) faster, lower-level coordination processes of behavioral matching and (...)
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  6.  18
    Keith Lehrer & Joseph Richard (1975). Remembering Without Knowing. Grazer Philosophische Studien 1:121-126.
    Memory sometimes yields knowledge and sometimes does not. It is, however, natural to suppose that i f a man remembers that p, then he knows that p and formerly knew that p. Remembering something is plausibly construed as a f o rm of knowing something which one has not forgotten and which one knew previously. We argue, to the contrary, that this thesis is false. We present four counterexamples to the thesis that support a different analysis of remembering. (...)
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  7.  12
    Saul Traiger (1978). Some Remarks on Lehrer and Richard's 'Remembering Without Knowing'. Grazer Philosophische Studien 6:107-111.
    This paper examines the four counterexamples offered by Lehrer and Richard in 'Remembering Without Knowing'. The analysis which Lehrer and Richard's purported counterexamples attempt to discredit is that remembering p requires knowing that p and believing that p. The counterexamples are considered individually and all are rejected as counterexamples to knowing as a necessary condition of remembering.
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  8.  5
    Mordechai Gordon (2015). Between Remembering and Forgetting. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (5):489-503.
    This essay seeks to add to a growing body of literature in philosophy of education that focuses on issues of historical consciousness and remembrance and their connections to moral education. In particular, I wish to explore the following questions: What does it mean to maintain a tension between remembering and forgetting tragic historical events? And what does an ethical stance that seeks to maintain this tension provide us? In what follows, I first describe two contemporary approaches to cultivating historical (...)
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  9.  5
    Linda J. Hayes (1998). Remembering as a Psychological Event. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 18 (2):135-143.
    Suggests a new way of speaking about the psychological events of remembering. The article begins with an overview of the conventional views of remembering, and then outlines an unconventional view of remembering. In the unconventional view a psychological event is essentially an historical event, an event in which its history is entailed, and one whose occurrence is a matter of contextual circumstances. After the analysis of remembering on the basis of this somewhat unconventional premises, the author (...)
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  10. David Middleton & Kyoko Murakami (2003). Collectivity and Agency in Remembering and Reconciliation. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 5 (1):16-30.
    This paper examines how British war veterans fold together war time and post war experiences in practices of remembering and reconciliation. We examine these practices as networks of association between British ex-servicemen (veterans) and the people, places and circumstances associated with their experiences as prisoners in Japan during WW2. We focus on the experience of World War 2 British ex-servicemen (veterans) who were prisoners of war in Far East. During their period of captivity they worked to build Thai-Burma Railway (...)
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  11. C. B. Martin & Max Deutscher (1966). Remembering. Philosophical Review 75 (April):161-96.
  12. John Sutton, Celia B. Harris, Paul G. Keil & Amanda J. Barnier (2010). The Psychology of Memory, Extended Cognition, and Socially Distributed Remembering. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):521-560.
    This paper introduces a new, expanded range of relevant cognitive psychological research on collaborative recall and social memory to the philosophical debate on extended and distributed cognition. We start by examining the case for extended cognition based on the complementarity of inner and outer resources, by which neural, bodily, social, and environmental resources with disparate but complementary properties are integrated into hybrid cognitive systems, transforming or augmenting the nature of remembering or decision-making. Adams and Aizawa, noting this distinctive complementarity (...)
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  13.  81
    Andrew Moon (2013). Remembering Entails Knowing. Synthese 190 (14):2717-2729.
    In his recent book, Bernecker (Memory, 2010) has attacked the following prominent view: (RK) S remembers that p only if S knows that p. An attack on RK is also an attack on Timothy Williamson’s view that knowledge is the most general factive stative attitude. In this paper, I defend RK against Bernecker’s attacks and also advance new arguments in favor of it. In Sect. 2, I provide some background on memory. In Sect 3, I respond to Bernecker’s attacks on (...)
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  14. B. S. Benjamin (1956). Remembering. Mind 65 (July):312-331.
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  15.  40
    Edward S. Casey (1977). Imagining and Remembering. Review of Metaphysics 31 (December):187-209.
  16.  27
    Edward S. Casey (1979). Perceiving and Remembering. Review of Metaphysics 32 (March):407-436.
  17. Max Deutscher (1989). Remembering "Remembering". In John Heil (ed.), Identity, Cause, and Mind. Kluwer
     
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  18.  21
    David F. Haight & M. R. Haight (1989). Time, Memory, and Self-Remembering. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 3 (1):1-11.
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  19.  21
    Anthony J. Cascardi (1984). Remembering. Review of Metaphysics 38 (December):275-302.
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  20.  8
    Craig R. Barclay (1996). Autobiographical Remembering: Narrative Constraints on Objectified Selves. In David C. Rubin (ed.), Remembering Our Past: Studies in Autobiographical Memory. Cambridge University Press 94--125.
    The general purposes of this essay are as follows: First, to outline an ecological model of autobiographical remembering by examining the purposes, processes, and products of reconstructing meaningful memories. Second, to argue that autobiographical remembering is embedded in affective, interpersonal, sociocultural, and historical contexts. Improvised selves are created in present contexts to serve psychosocial, cultural, and historical purposes, and third, to demonstrate essential constraints on the construction of coherent personal narratives that give meaning and purpose to our everyday (...)
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  21.  1
    Addison E. Woodward & Robert A. Bjork (1971). Forgetting and Remembering in Free Recall: Intentional and Unintentional. Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (1):109.
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  22.  1
    Douwe B. Yntema & Gayle E. Mueser (1960). Remembering the Present States of a Number of Variables. Journal of Experimental Psychology 60 (1):18.
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  23.  13
    S. Jack Odell (1971). Malcolm on 'Remembering That'. Mind 80 (October):593.
  24.  4
    W. von Leyden (1961). Remembering: A Philosophical Problem. Philosophical Library.
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  25.  12
    Richard K. Scheer (1979). Margolis on Remembering. Mind 88 (April):280-281.
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  26. Hugh J. Silverman (1978). Imagining, Perceiving, and Remembering. Humanitas 14 (May):197-207.
     
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  27.  71
    Samuli Pöyhönen (2015). Memory as a Cognitive Kind: Brains, Remembering Dyads, and Exograms. In Catherine Kendig (ed.), Memory as a cognitive kind: Brains, remembering dyads, and exograms. Routledge 145-156.
    Theories of natural kinds can be seen to face a twofold task: First, they should provide an ontological account of what kinds of (fundamental) things there are, what exists. The second task is an epistemological one, accounting for the inductive reliability of acceptable scientific concepts. In this chapter I examine whether concepts and categories used in the cognitive sciences should be understood as natural kinds. By using examples from human memory research to illustrate my argument, I critically examine some of (...)
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  28. Celia B. Harris, Paul Keil, John Sutton, Amanda Barnier & Doris McIlwain (2011). We Remember, We Forget: Collaborative Remembering in Older Couples. Discourse Processes 48 (4):267-303.
    Transactive memory theory describes the processes by which benefits for memory can occur when remembering is shared in dyads or groups. In contrast, cognitive psychology experiments demonstrate that social influences on memory disrupt and inhibit individual recall. However, most research in cognitive psychology has focused on groups of strangers recalling relatively meaningless stimuli. In the current study, we examined social influences on memory in groups with a shared history, who were recalling a range of stimuli, from word lists to (...)
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  29. John Sutton & Kellie Williamson (2014). Embodied Remembering. In L. Shapiro (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge
    Experiences of embodied remembering are familiar and diverse. We settle bodily into familiar chairs or find our way easily round familiar rooms. We inhabit our own kitchens or cars or workspaces effectively and comfortably, and feel disrupted when our habitual and accustomed objects or technologies change or break or are not available. Hearing a particular song can viscerally bring back either one conversation long ago, or just the urge to dance. Some people explicitly use their bodies to record, store, (...)
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  30.  10
    Lucas M. Bietti & John Sutton (2015). Multiple Timescales of Joint Remembering in the Crafting of aMemory-Scaffolding Tool During Collaborative Design. In G. Airenti, B. G. Bara & G. Sandini (eds.), roceedings of EuroAsianPacific Joint Conference on Cognitive Science. 60-65.
    Joint remembering relies on the successful interweaving of multiple cognitive, linguistic, bodily, social and material resources, anchored in specific cultural ecosystems. Such systems for joint remembering in social interactions are composed of processes unfolding over multiple but complementary timescales which we distinguish for analytic purposes with the terms ‘coordination’, ‘collaboration’, ‘cooperation’, and ‘culture’, so as better to study their interanimation in practice. As an illustrative example of the complementary timescales involved in joint remembering in a real-world activity, (...)
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  31. John Sutton (2012). Memory Before the Game: Switching Perspectives in Imagining and Remembering Sport and Movement. Journal of Mental Imagery 36 (1/2):85-95.
    This paper addresses relations between memory and imagery in expert sport in relation to visual or visuospatial perspective. Imagining, remembering, and moving potentially interact via related forms of episodic simulation, whether future- or past-directed. Sometimes I see myself engaged in action: many experts report switching between such external visual perspectives and an internal, 'own-eyes', or field perspective on their past or possible performance. Perspective in retrieval and in imagery may be flexible and multiple. I raise a range of topics (...)
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  32.  29
    Nils Dahlbäck, Mattias Kristiansson & Fredrik Stjernberg (2013). Distributed Remembering Through Active Structuring of Activities and Environments. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (1):153-165.
    In this paper, we consider a few actual cases of mnemonic strategies among older subjects (older than 65). The cases are taken from an ethnographic study, examining how elderly adults cope with cognitive decline. We believe that these cases illustrate that the process of remembering in many cases involve a complex distributed web of processes involving both internal or intracranial and external sources. Our cases illustrate that the nature of distributed remembering is shaped by and subordinated to the (...)
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  33.  24
    John C. Trueswell & Anna Papafragou, Perceiving and Remembering Events Cross-Linguistically: Evidence From Dual-Task Paradigms.
    What role does language play during attention allocation in perceiving and remembering events? We recorded adults‟ eye movements as they studied animated motion events for a later recognition task. We compared native speakers of two languages that use different means of expressing motion (Greek and English). In Experiment 1, eye movements revealed that, when event encoding was made difficult by requiring a concurrent task that did not involve language (tapping), participants spent extra time studying what their language treats as (...)
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  34.  27
    Josef Perner, Daniela Kloo & Michael Rohwer (2010). Retro- and Prospection for Mental Time Travel: Emergence of Episodic Remembering and Mental Rotation in 5 to 8 Year Old Children. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Cognition 19 (3):802-815.
    We investigate the common development of children’s ability to “look back in time” and to “look into the future” . Experiment 1 with 59 children 5 to 8.5 years old showed mental rotation, as a measure of prospection, explaining specific variance of free recall, as a measure of episodic remembering when controlled for cued recall. Experiment 2 with 31 children from 5 to 6.5 years measured episodic remembering with recall of visually experienced events when controlling for recall of (...)
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  35.  9
    Heather J. Rice & David C. Rubin (2011). Remembering From Any Angle: The Flexibility of Visual Perspective During Retrieval. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):568-577.
    When recalling autobiographical memories, individuals often experience visual images associated with the event. These images can be constructed from two different perspectives: first person, in which the event is visualized from the viewpoint experienced at encoding, or third person, in which the event is visualized from an external vantage point. Using a novel technique to measure visual perspective, we examined where the external vantage point is situated in third-person images. Individuals in two studies were asked to recall either 10 or (...)
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  36.  27
    Martin M. Fagin, Jeremy K. Yamashiro & William C. Hirst (2013). The Adaptive Function of Distributed Remembering: Contributions to the Formation of Collective Memory. [REVIEW] Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (1):91-106.
    Empirical research has increasingly turned its attention to distributed cognition. Acts of remembering are embedded in a social, interactional context; cognitive labor is divided between a rememberer and external sources. The present article examines the benefits and costs associated with distributed, collaborative, conversational remembering. Further, we examine the consequences of joint acts of remembering on subsequent individual acts of remembering. Here, we focus on influences on memory through social contagion and socially shared retrieval-induced forgetting. Extending beyond (...)
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  37.  6
    Steven James (2016). Epistemic and Non‐Epistemic Theories of Remembering. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 97 (2):n/a-n/a.
    Contemporary memory sciences describe processes that are dynamic and constructive. This has led some philosophers to weaken the relationship between memory and epistemology; though remembering can give rise to epistemic success, it is not itself an epistemic success state. I argue that non-epistemic theories will not do; they provide neither necessary nor sufficient conditions for remembering that p. I also argue that the shortcomings of the causal theory are epistemic in nature. Consequently, a theory of remembering must (...)
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  38.  3
    Mary K. DeShazer (2014). Documenting Women’s Postoperative Bodies: Knowing Stephanie and “Remembering Stephanie” as Collaborative Cancer Narratives. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (4):445-454.
    Photographic representations of women living with or beyond breast cancer have gained prominence in recent decades. Postmillennial visual narratives are both documentary projects and dialogic sites of self-construction and reader-viewer witness. After a brief overview of 30 years of breast cancer photography, this essay analyzes a collaborative photo-documentary by Stephanie Byram and Charlee Brodsky, Knowing Stephanie , and a memorial photographic essay by Brodsky written ten years after Byram’s death, “Remembering Stephanie” . The ethics of representing women’s postsurgical bodies (...)
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  39.  17
    John Corcoran (2008). Remembering My Life with Peter Hare. Philosophy Now 58:62-70.
    Excerpts and paraphrases of this memoir appeared in 2008 and 2009. I posted it in full here in happy memory of Peter Hare and my joyful years with him. -/- 2008. Remembering Peter Hare 1935–2008. Philosophy Now. Co-authors: T. Madigan and A. Razin. Issue 66 March/April 2008. Pages 50–2. PDF -/- 2009. Remembering My Life with Peter Hare. Remembering Peter Hare 1935–2008. Ed. J. Campbell. Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy. pp. 9–16. http://american-philosophy.org/documents/RememberingPeterHare_final.pdf -/- Peter H. (...)
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  40.  14
    Natasha Lushetich (2015). Private Reconstructions of Past Collective Experiences: Technologies of Remembering-Forgetting. Environment, Space, Place 7 (1):105-134.
    This article queries the notion of performance as a sustained act of commemoration, and, thus, implicitly, atonement and forgetting. Laying aside potential considerations of guilt and/or victimisation inherent in the spatio-temporal superimposition of a World War II modality of existence on an affluent, and, by comparison, peaceful part of the world, my investigation focuses on three mutually related areas of performance: the body’s hidden somaticity, the co-becoming of the self and time; and walking as a mnemonic mechanism. Aided by the (...)
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  41.  31
    Celia B. Harris, John Sutton, Paul Keil & Amanda Barnier, Collaborative Remembering: When Can Remembering With Others Be Beneficial?
    Experimental memory research has traditionally focused on the individual, and viewed social influence as a source of error or inhibition. However, in everyday life, remembering is often a social activity, and theories from philosophy and psychology predict benefits of shared remembering. In a series of studies, both experimental and more qualitative, we attempted to bridge this gap by examining the effects of collaboration on memory in a variety of situations and in a variety of groups. We discuss our (...)
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  42.  33
    John Sutton (2009). Extended and Constructive Remembering: Two Notes on Martin and Deutscher. Crossroads: An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Study of History, Philosophy, Religion, and Classics 4 (1):79-91.
    Martin and Deutscher’s remarkable 1966 paper ‘Remembering’ still offers great riches to memory researchers across distinctive traditions, both in its methodological ambition (successfully marrying phenomenological and causal discourses) and in its content. In this short discussion, after briefly setting the paper in its context, we hone in on two live and under-explored issues which have gained attention recently under new labels – the extended mind hypothesis, and the constructive nature of memory. We suggest that Martin and Deutscher’s causal analysis (...)
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  43.  7
    Lucas M. Bietti (2012). Towards a Cognitive Pragmatics of Collective Remembering. Pragmatics and Cognition 20 (1):32-61.
    This article aims to provide a cognitive and discourse based theory to collective memory research. Despite the fact that a large proportion of studies in collective memory research in social, cognitive, and discourse psychology are based on investigations of cognitive and discourse processes, neither linguistics nor cognitive and social psychologists have proposed an integrative, interdisciplinary and discursive-based theory to memory research. I argue that processes of remembering are always embodied and action oriented reconstructions of the past, which are highly (...)
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  44.  60
    John Sutton (2009). Remembering. In P. Robbins & M. Aydede (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge UP
    The case of remembering poses a particular challenge to theories of situated cognition, and its successful treatment within this framework will require a more dramatic integration of levels, fields, and methods than has yet been achieved. 1. Introduction: the interdisciplinary framework 2. Remembering as constructive activity and interpersonal skill 3. Remembering as social interaction and joint attention to the past 4. Shared remembering 5. Distributed cognition and exograms 6. Conclusion.
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  45.  26
    Christoph Hoerl (2014). Remembering Events and Remembering Looks. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (3):351-372.
    I describe and discuss one particular dimension of disagreement in the philosophical literature on episodic memory. One way of putting the disagreement is in terms of the question as to whether or not there is a difference in kind between remembering seeing x and remembering what x looks like. I argue against accounts of episodic memory that either deny that there is a clear difference between these two forms of remembering, or downplay the difference by in effect (...)
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  46.  21
    Andrew Naylor (1986). Remembering Without Knowing — Not Without Justification. Philosophical Studies 49 (3):295 - 311.
    K. Lehrer and J. Richard’s analysis of remembering that p is shown to be deficient, particularly because it fails to treat factual memory as an epistemic concept. Adding a requirement concerning the subject’s past justification accommodates instances of factual memory without factual knowledge, helps explain the role of justification in remembering that p, and strengthens the analysis against certain counterexamples. The paper includes an assessment of A. Cusmariu;s definition of impure memory.
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  47.  6
    Andrew Howes, Geoffrey B. Duggan, Kiran Kalidindi, Yuan‐Chi Tseng & Richard L. Lewis (2015). Predicting Short‐Term Remembering as Boundedly Optimal Strategy Choice. Cognitive Science 40 (1).
    It is known that, on average, people adapt their choice of memory strategy to the subjective utility of interaction. What is not known is whether an individual's choices are boundedly optimal. Two experiments are reported that test the hypothesis that an individual's decisions about the distribution of remembering between internal and external resources are boundedly optimal where optimality is defined relative to experience, cognitive constraints, and reward. The theory makes predictions that are tested against data, not fitted to it. (...)
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  48.  35
    William Day (2011). I Don't Know, Just Wait: Remembering Remarriage in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. In David LaRocca (ed.), The Philosophy of Charlie Kaufman. University Press of Kentucky
    "In 'I Don't Know, Just Wait: Remembering Remarriage in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind', William Day shows how Kaufman's Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind should be considered part of the film genre known as remarriage comedy; but he also shows how Kaufman contributes something new to the genre. Day addresses, in particular, how the conversation that is the condition for reunion involves discovering 'what it means to have memories together as a way of learning how to be (...)
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  49.  41
    Kellie Williamson & John Sutton (forthcoming). Embodied Remembering. In L. Shapiro (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Embodied Cognition. Routledge
    Experiences of embodied remembering are familiar and diverse. We settle bodily into familiar chairs or find our way easily round familiar rooms. We inhabit our own kitchens or cars or workspaces effectively and comfortably, and feel disrupted when our habitual and accustomed objects or technologies change or break or are not available. Hearing a particular song can viscerally bring back either one conversation long ago, or just the urge to dance. Some people explicitly use their bodies to record, store, (...)
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  50. Barbara DeConcini (1990). Narrative Remembering. Upa.
    This work is a philosophical treatment of the human activity of remembering as it occurs both in fiction and in life, and as a hermeneutical act. The author begins her treatment by tracing the way numerous authors within the mainstream history of philosophy have basically denigrated the role of memory in the constitution of reality in favor of a more easily measurable physical construct.
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