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Profile: Remy Debes (University of Memphis)
  1. Remy Debes (2014). Editorial Introduction: Scottish Reactions to Mandeville. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 12 (1):v-viii.
    Given a steady increase of interest in 18th Scottish philosophy it isn't surprising that Mandeville is also enjoying a new wave of interest. On the one hand, Mandeville had an especially obvious influence on Scottish Enlightenment thought. As the contributions in this volume demonstrate, the Scots took Mandeville very seriously, more so than any other collective audience at the time. In The Fable, the Scots saw fundamental challenges, not mere rabble-rousing social commentary. On the other hand, an essential aspect of (...)
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  2. Remy Debes (2013). Untangling Dignity. The Philosophers' Magazine 62 (62):118-119.
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  3. Remy Debes (2012). Adam Smith on Dignity and Equality. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (1):109 - 140.
    Where exactly should we place Adam Smith in the cannon of classical liberalism? Smith's advocacy of free market economics and defence of religious liberty in The Wealth of Nations suffice for including him somewhere in that tradition.1 The nature and extent of Smith's liberalism, however, remain up for debate. One recent trend has been to characterise Smith as a proponent of social liberalism. This includes those like Stephen Darwall, Samuel Fleischacker and Charles Griswold, who have drawn attention to a kind (...)
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  4. Remy Debes (2012). Recasting Scottish Sentimentalism: The Peculiarity of Moral Approval. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 10 (1):91-115.
  5. Remy Debes (2011). Editor's Introduction. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (s1):1-3.
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  6. Remy Debes (2011). Emotion, Value, and the Ambiguous Honor of a Handbook. Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (2):273-285.
    Scholars take note: the philosophy of emotion is staking its claim. Peter Goldie's new Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion (OHPE) is undoubtedly the most significant collection of original philosophical essays on emotion to date. It spans a broad range of topics from the nature of mind and reason to personal identity and beauty. It also boasts an incredible set of prestigious authors. But more than that - it bears testimony to its own legitimacy.
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  7. Remy Debes (2011). Review of George Kateb, Human Dignity. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2011 (5).
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  8. Remy Debes (2010). Which Empathy? Limitations in the Mirrored “Understanding” of Emotion. Synthese 175 (2):219-239.
    The recent discovery of so-called “mirror-neurons” in monkeys and a corresponding mirroring “system” in humans has provoked wide endorsement of the claim that humans understand a variety of observed actions, somatic sensations, and emotions via a kind of direct representation of those actions, sensations, and emotions. Philosophical efforts to assess the import of such “mirrored understanding” have typically focused on how that understanding might be brought to bear on theories of mindreading (how we represent other creatures as having mental states), (...)
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  9. Remy Debes (2009). Dignity's Gauntlet. Philosophical Perspectives 23 (1):45-78.
    The philosophy of “human dignity” remains a young, piecemeal endeavor with only a small, dedicated literature. And what dedicated literature exists makes for a rather slapdash mix of substantive and formal metatheory (i.e. theory about either what dignity consists in, or about the properties, distinguishing characteristics, or explanatory demands that apply generally to any contentful account of dignity’s nature). Worse, ironically we seem compelled to treat this existing theory both charitably and casually. For how can we definitively assess any of (...)
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  10. Remy Debes (2009). Neither Here nor There: The Cognitive Nature of Emotion. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 146 (1):1 - 27.
    The philosophy of emotion has long been divided over the cognitive nature of emotion. In this paper I argue that this debate suffers from deep confusion over the meaning of “cognition” itself. This confusion has in turn obscured critical substantive agreement between the debate’s principal opponents. Capturing this agreement and remedying this confusion requires re-conceptualizing “the cognitive” as it functions in first-order theories of emotion. Correspondingly, a sketch for a new account of cognitivity is offered. However, I also argue that (...)
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  11. Remy Debes (2008). Review of Valerie Tiberius, The Reflective Life: Living Wisely with Our Limits. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (10).
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  12. Margaret Atherton, Tom Beauchamp, Deborah Boyle, Emily Carson, Dorothy Coleman, Angela Coventry, Shelagh Crooks, Remy Debes, Georges Dicker & Paul Draper (2007). Hume Studies Referees, 2006-2007. Hume Studies 33 (2):385-387.
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  13. Remy Debes (2007). Has Anything Changed? Hume's Theory of Association and Sympathy After the Treatise. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (2):313 – 338.
  14. Remy Debes (2007). Humanity, Sympathy and the Puzzle of Hume's Second Enquiry. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 15 (1):27 – 57.