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  1. René C. W. Mandl, Hugo G. Schnack, Marcel P. Zwiers, René S. Kahn & Hilleke E. Hulshoff Pol (2013). Functional Diffusion Tensor Imaging at 3 Tesla. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
    In a previous study we reported on a non-invasive functional diffusion tensor imaging (fDTI) method to measure neuronal signals directly from subtle changes in fractional anisotropy along white matter tracts. We hypothesized that these fractional anisotropy changes relate to morphological changes of glial cells induced by axonal activity. In the present study we set out to replicate the results of the previous study with an improved fDTI scan acquisition scheme. A group of twelve healthy human participants were scanned on a (...)
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  2. René Cw Mandl, Hugo G. Schnack, Marcel P. Zwiers, René S. Kahn, Hulshoff Pol & E. Hilleke (2013). Functional Diffusion Tensor Imaging at 3 Tesla. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:817.
  3. Geartsje Boonstra, Diederick E. Grobbee, Eelko Hak, René S. Kahn & Huibert Burger (2011). Initiation of Antipsychotic Treatment by General Practitioners. A Case–Control Study. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (1):12-17.
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  4. Metten Somers, Sebastiaan F. W. Neggers, Kelly M. Diederen, Marco P. Boks, Rene S. Kahn & Iris E. Sommer (2011). The Measurement of Language Lateralization with Functional Transcranial Doppler and Functional MRI: A Critical Evaluation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.
    Cerebral language lateralization can be assessed in several ways. In healthy subjects, functional MRI (fMRI) during performance of a language task has evolved to be the most frequently applied method. Functional Transcranial Doppler (fTCD) may provide a valid alternative, but has been used rarely. Both techniques have their own strengths and weaknesses and as a result may be applied in different fields of research. Until now, only one relatively small study (n=13) investigated the correlation between lateralization indices measured by fTCD (...)
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  5. Antoin D. De Weijer, Rene C. W. Mandl, Iris Sommer, Matthijs Vink, Rene S. Kahn & Sebastiaan F. W. Neggers (2010). Human Fronto-Tectal and Fronto-Striatal-Tectal Pathways Activate Differently During Anti-Saccades. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:41.
    Almost all cortical areas in the vertebrate brain take part in recurrent connections through the subcortical basal ganglia (BG) nuclei, through parallel inhibitory and excitatory loops. It has been suggested that these circuits can modulate our reactions to external events such that appropriate reactions are chosen from many available options, thereby imposing volitional control over behavior. The saccade system is an excellent model system to study cortico-BG interactions. In this study two possible pathways were investigated that might regulate automaticity of (...)
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  6. André Aleman, Edward H. F. de Haan & René S. Kahn (2004). Underconstrained Perception or Underconstrained Theory? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):787-788.
    Although the evidence remains tentative at best, the conception of hallucinations in schizophrenia as being underconstrained perception resulting from intrinsic thalamocortical resonance in sensory areas might complement current models of hallucination. However, in itself, the approach falls short of comprehensively explaining the neurogenesis of hallucinations in schizophrenia, as it neglects the role of external attributional biases, mental imagery, and a disconnection between frontal and temporal areas.
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  7. André Aleman & René S. Kahn (2004). Genes Can Disconnect the Social Brain in More Than One Way. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):855-855.
    Burns proposes an intriguing hypothesis by suggesting that the “schizophrenia genes” might not be regulatory genes themselves, but rather closely associated with regulatory genes directly involved in the proper growth of the social brain. We point out that this account would benefit from incorporating the effects of localized lesions and aberrant hemispheric asymmetry on cortical connectivity underlying the social brain. In addition, we argue that the evolutionary framework is superfluous.
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  8. Iris E. C. Sommer & René S. Kahn (2003). The Left Hemisphere as the Redundant Hemisphere. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):239-240.
    In this commentary we argue that evolution of the human brain to host the language system was accomplished by the selective development of frontal and temporal areas in the left hemisphere. The unilateral development of Broca's and Wernicke's areas could have resulted from one or more transcription factors that have an expression pattern restricted to the left hemisphere.
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  9. André Aleman & René S. Kahn (2002). Top-Down Modulation, Emotion, and Hallucination. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):578-578.
    We argue that the pivotal role assigned by Northoff to the principle of top-down modulation in catatonia might successfully be applied to other symptoms of schizophrenia, for example, hallucinations. Second, we propose that Northoff's account would benefit from a more comprehensive analysis of the cognitive level of explanation. Finally, contrary to Northoff, we hypothesize that “top-down modulation” might play as important a role as “horizontal modulation” in affective-behavioral alterations.
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