Search results for 'Renaissance' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Sutton (2000). Body, Mind and Order: Local Memory and the Control of Mental Representations in Medieval and Renaissance Sciences of Self. In Guy Freeland & Antony Corones (eds.), 1543 And All That: word and image in the proto- scientific revolution. 117-150.
    This paper is a tentative step towards a historical cognitive science, in the domain of memory and personal identity. I treat theoretical models of memory in history as specimens of the way cultural norms and artifacts can permeate ('proto')scientific views of inner processes. I apply this analysis to the topic of psychological control over one's own body, brain, and mind. Some metaphors and models for memory and mental representation signal the projection inside of external aids. Overtly at least, (...)
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  2.  16
    Risto Saarinen (2011). Weakness of Will in Renaissance and Reformation Thought. Oxford University Press.
    In addition to considering the work of a broad range of Renaissance authors (including Petrarch, Donato Acciaiuoli, John Mair, and Francesco Piccolomini), Risto ...
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  3.  91
    Ernst Cassirer (1963/2000). The Individual and the Cosmos in Renaissance Philosophy. Dover Publications.
    This thought-provoking classic investigates how the Renaissance spirit fundamentally questioned and undermined medieval thought. Of value to students of literature, political theory, history of religious and Reformation thought, and the history of science.
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  4.  14
    Charles B. Schmitt, Quentin Skinner & Eckhard Kessler (eds.) (1988). The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy offers a balanced and comprehensive account of philosophical thought from the middle of the fourteenth century to the emergence of modern philosophy at the turn of the seventeenth century. The Renaissance has attracted intense scholarly attention for over a century, but in the beginning the philosophy of the period was relatively neglected and this is the first volume in English to synthesize for a wider readership the substantial and sophisticated research now available. (...)
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  5.  23
    Viatcheslav Vetrov (2012). Zur Dekonstruktion des Un/Gesunden in philologischen Taxonomien: westlich-chinesischer Renaissance-Diskurs. Oriens Extremus 51:231-268.
    Following Mary Douglas' conviction that "dirt is never an isolated event", the present study aims at a systematic analysis of bodily projections of good and poor health (bacteria, diseases, im/purity etc.) into philological taxonomies of Republican China. Embedded in a global Renaissance discourse, modern Chinese representations of un/healthy language and un/healthy literature provided a system according to which the whole body of the national cultural heritage could be reexamined quickly and at the minimum expense of spiritual effort.
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  6.  19
    David Summers (1987). The Judgment of Sense: Renaissance Naturalism and the Rise of Aesthestics. Cambridge University Press.
    'ith the rise of naturalism in the art of the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance there developed an extensive and diverse literature about art which helped to explain, justify, and shape its new aims. In this book, David Summers provides an original investigation of the philosophical and psychological notions invoked in this new theory and criticism. From a thorough examination of the sources, he shows how the medieval language of mental discourse derived from an understanding of classical thought. (...)
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  7.  40
    G. H. R. Parkinson (ed.) (1993). The Renaissance and Seventeenth-Century Rationalism. Routledge.
    The Routledge History of Philosophy, Volume 4 covers a period of three hundred and fifty years, from the middle of the fourteenth century to the early years of the eighteenth century and the birth of modern philosophy. The focus of this volume is on Renaissance philosophy and seventeenth-century rationalism, particularly that of Descartes, Spinoza, and Leibniz. Science was ascendant during the Renaissance and beyond, and the Copernican revolution represented the philosophical climax of the middle ages. This volume is (...)
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  8.  47
    Brian P. Copenhaver (1992). Renaissance Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    The Renaissance has long been recognized as a brilliant moment in the development of Western civilization. Little attention has been devoted, however, to the distinct contribution of philosophy to Renaissance culture. This volume introduces the reader to the philosophy written, read, taught, and debated during the period traditionally credited with the "revival of learning." Beginning with original sources still largely inaccessible to most readers, and drawing on a wide range of secondary studies, the author examines the relation of (...)
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  9.  34
    Georgios Steiris (2012). Renaissance Studies in Greece. Kunsttexte.De, Nr. 3, 2012 3:1-5.
    Since the 19th century Renaissance studies gained gradually autonomy from the Medieval and the Early Modern studies. In countries like Greece, where the traditional view was that no Renaissance occurred in the Balkan Peninsula during the 14th -16th century as a result of the Turkish occupation, Renaissance studies had to struggle to gain autonomy and distinct presence in the curricula of Greek universities. This article aims to present the current status of the Renaissance studies in the (...)
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  10.  14
    Alain LeRoy Locke (1989). The Philosophy of Alain Locke: Harlem Renaissance and Beyond. Temple University Press.
    Discusses Locke's life and views and their impact on American philosophy, as well as his role in the Harlem Renaissance.
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  11.  1
    Tony Svetelj (2016). A Renaissance of Globalization: A Theory of Compassionate Humanity. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 23 (2):217-233.
    In a world of confrontations between numerous cultures, traditions, languages, and religions, the meaning of “human” and “humanism” reaches a higher level of “humanness.” The pluralism of cultural, political, and religious outlook creates new options and alternative interpretations of what constitutes the “human.” True humanness is always there, open and accessible to all, with nothing being hidden or obscured. At the same time, true humanness is also a matter of doing, not just being. To be “true” is to live the (...)
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  12.  23
    Ian Maclean (2011). The Logic of Physiognomony in the Late Renaissance. Early Science and Medicine 16 (4):275-295.
    This article studies the advances made in the logic of Renaissance physiognomy from the state of the subject in antiquity and the Middle Ages. The properties and accidents of the human body are investigated in the context of the signs selected by physiognomers, whether univocal or in syndromes, strong or weak in character, negative or positive, consistent with each other or contradictory. When these signs are translated into propositions, the construction of argument which flows from them is shown (...)
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  13.  17
    Hiro Hirai (2007). Semence, vertu formatrice et intellect agent chez Nicolò Leoniceno entre la tradition arabo-latine et la renaissance des commentateurs grecs. Early Science and Medicine 12 (2):134-165.
    The treatise On Formative Power of Ferrara's emblematic medical humanist, Nicolò Leoniceno , is the one of the first embryological monographs of the Renaissance. It shows, at the same time, the continuity of medieval Arabo-Latin tradition and the new elements brought by Renaissance medical humanism, namely through the use of the ancient Greek commentators of Aristotle like Simplicius. Thus this treatise stands at the crossroad of these two currents. The present study analyses the range of Leoniceno's philosophical discussion, (...)
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  14.  53
    Agnes Heller (1981). Renaissance Man. Schocken Books.
    INTRODUCTION Is there a * Renaissance ideal of man'? The consciousness that man is a historical being is a product of bourgeois development ; the condition ...
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  15.  35
    Dominique Raynaud (2007). Le Tracé Continu Des Sections Coniques À la Renaissance: Applications Optico-Perspectives, Héritage de la Tradition Mathématique Arabe. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 17 (2):299-345.
    Après une longue éclipse, le compas parfait utilisé par al-Qûhî, al-Sijzî et leurs successeurs pour faire le tracé continu des sections coniques réapparaît chez des mathématiciens de la Renaissance comme le vénitien Francesco Barozzi. La résurgence de cet instrument est liée à son utilité pour résoudre les nouveaux problèmes optico-perspectifs. Après avoir passé en revue les différents instruments permettant le tracé des sections coniques, l'article se focalise sur le compas à coniques et décrit ses usages théoriques et pratiques. Contrairement (...)
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  16.  6
    Luca Bianchi (2004). Interpréter Aristote par Aristote. Parcours de l'herméneutique philosophique à la Renaissance. Methodos 2.
    On peut remettre en question plusieurs schémas conceptuels utilisés par les historiens de l’herméneutique si l’on tient compte de l’histoire de traditions philosophiques qui ne devraient pas être négligées par ceux qui s’attachent à reconstruire le développement des notions et des méthodes herméneutiques. Centré sur la tradition aristotélicienne, cet article a pour but de montrer : 1) qu’entre le Moyen Âge et la Renaissance, le sens du terme latin interpretatio a sensiblement changé ; 2) que l’approche humaniste du corpus (...)
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  17.  13
    Paul Oskar Kristeller (1980). Renaissance Thought and the Arts: Collected Essays. Princeton University Press.
    Written by an eminent authority on the Renaissance, this collection of essays focuses on topics such as humanist learning, humanist moral thought, the diffusion of humanism, Platonism, music and learning during the early Renaissance, and ...
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  18.  23
    Paul Oskar Kristeller, Thomas A. Brady & Heiko Augustinus Oberman (eds.) (1975). Itinerarium Italicum: The Profile of the Italian Renaissance in the Mirror of its European Transformations: Dedicated to Paul Oskar Kristeller on the Occasion of His 70th Birthday. Brill.
    Oberman, H. A. Quoscunque tulit foecunda vetustas.--Bouwsma, W. J. The two faces of humanism.--Gilmore, M. P. Italian reactions to Erasmian humanism.--Dresden, S. The profile of the reception of the Italian Renaissance in France.--IJsewijn, J. The coming of humanism to the Low Countries.--Hay, D. England and the humanities in the fifteenth century.--Spitz, L. W. The course of German humanism.
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  19.  6
    Craig Martin (2009). Conjecture, Probabilism, and Provisional Knowledge in Renaissance Meteorology. Early Science and Medicine 14 (1):265-289.
    For Renaissance Aristotelian natural philosophers, ideally knowledge was certain and based on syllogistic demonstration. Many Italian scholars, such as Agostino Nifo, Pietro Pomponazzi, and Niccolò Cabeo, considered this ideal as inapplicable to the field of meteorology. Rather, because of the accidental nature of meteorological phenomena and the inherent irregularity of the weather, they believed that causal explanations of meteorology were largely conjectural, provisional, and probabilistic. Several of these natural philosophers applied the standard of "saving the appearances" to the field (...)
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  20.  2
    David A. Hughes (2014). Renaissance Catholicism and Contemporary Liberalism. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (1):45-77.
    Contemporary (post-1945) liberalism functions analogously to Roman Catholicism in the decades after 1443. Both ideologies, in their respective periods, represent the hegemonic ideology of Western civilization, despite the fact that both comprise a miscellany of competing belief systems. Both ideologies are dominated by a single hegemonic power—the United States and the Renaissance papacy, respectively—which strives for doctrinal stability. All who reject official “doctrine,” however, are rendered liable to violent suppression. In this, papal Catholicism and American liberalism display an ultra-conservative (...)
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  21.  3
    Jean Celeyrette (2014). Compte rendu de Isabelle Pantin et Gérald Péoux (éds), Mise en forme des savoirs à la Renaissance. À la croisée des idées, des techniques et des publics, Paris, A. Colin, 2013. Methodos 14.
    L’existence d’une rupture radicale entre les maîtres médiévaux et les auteurs de la Renaissance, revendiquée par ces derniers, est aujourd’hui largement remise en question. Même si à partir du XVe siècle apparaissent de nouveaux savoirs accompagnés d’une modification des méthodes, l’expression de « révolution renaissante », par référence à la notion de révolution scientifique introduite par Kuhn, semble pour le moins inappropriée. Comme le dit Laurence Boulègue : « On aurait pu croire que la ..
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  22.  2
    Thierry Ménissier (2012). Métamorphoses de l'idée d'empire à la Renaissance. Astérion 10.
    Époque de transition, la Renaissance connaît une série d’évolutions de l’idée politique d’empire (héritée du Moyen Âge) vers la réalité moderne d’un vaste marché coordonnant progressivement les économies nationales particulières et leurs réseaux d’influence. Ces évolutions permettent-elles d’évoquer la mise en place d’une « version économique de l’empire » ? Peut-on regarder ce qui se joue à la Renaissance, saisie à travers ses relations géopolitiques, comme la préfiguration de la globalisation ? L’article examine ces questions à partir de (...)
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  23.  1
    Mirko Blagojevic (2004). A Sociological View of the Russian Religious Renaissance at the End of the Twentieth Century: Its Scope, Limits and Tendencies. Filozofija I Društvo 24:189-227.
    In this article I have dealt with empirical proofs for the Russian religious renaissance which came after the fall of the Soviet socialistic empire and carried on all through the nineties as a pro-religious consensus and a religious belief. Likewise, I have dealt with proofs suggesting certain limitations of the renaissance in question which manifested mainly in irregular fulfillment of religious duties.
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  24.  4
    Laurence Boulègue & Carlos Lévy (eds.) (2007). Hédonismes: Penser Et Dire le Plaisir Dans l'Antiquité Et à la Renaissance: [Actes du Colloque Sur les Philosophies du Plaisir Organisé En Juin 2004 à l'Université de Lille 3]. [REVIEW] Presses Universitaires du Septentrion.
    Cet ouvrage collectif est le fruit d'un colloque sur les philosophies du plaisir qui a réuni philologues et philosophes, spécialistes de l'Antiquité et de la Renaissance, en juin 2004, à l'Université de Lille 3.
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  25. Henri Busson (1971). Le Rationalisme Dans la Littérature Française de la Renaissance. Vrin.
    Henri Busson. Directeur : Pierre MESNARD I LE RATIONALISME DANS LA LITTÉRATURE FRANÇAISE * DE LA RENAISSANCE (1533-1601) par HENRI BUSSON Professeur Honoraire à la Faculté des Lettres d'Alger Nouvelle édition, revue ...
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  26.  18
    James Hankins (ed.) (2007). The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    The Cambridge Companion to Renaissance Philosophy provides an introduction to a complex period of change in the subject matter and practice of philosophy. The philosophy of the fourteenth through sixteenth centuries is often seen as transitional between the scholastic philosophy of the Middle Ages and modern philosophy, but the essays collected here, by a distinguished international team of contributors, call these assumptions into question, emphasizing both the continuity with scholastic philosophy and the role of Renaissance philosophy in the (...)
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  27. Paul Oskar Kristeller (1974). Medieval Aspects of Renaissance Learning. Durham, N.C.,Duke University Press.
    The scholar and his public in the late Middle Ages and the Renaissance.--Thomism and the Italian thought of the Renaissance.--The contribution of religious orders to Renaissance thought and learning.--Bibliography (p. [115]-120).
     
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  28. Paul Oskar Kristeller (1972). Renaissance Concepts of Man, and Other Essays. New York,Harper & Row.
    Renaissance concepts of man: The Arensberg lectures: The dignity of man. The immortality of the soul. The unity of truth.--The Renaissance and Byzantine learning: Italian Humanism and Byzantium.--Byzantine and Western Platonism in the fifteenth century.--Wimmer lecture: Renaissance philosophy and the medieval tradition.--Appendix: History of Philosophy and history of ideas.
     
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  29.  5
    John L. Lepage (2012). The Revival of Antique Philosophy in the Renaissance. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book examines the revival of antique philosophy in the Renaissance as a literary preoccupation informed by wit.
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  30. John Jeffries Martin (2004). Myths of Renaissance Individualism. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The idea that the Renaissance witnessed the emergence of the modern individual remains a powerful myth. In this important new book Martin examines the Renaissance self with attention to both social history and literary theory and offers a new typology of Renaissance selfhood which was at once collective, performative and porous. At the same time, he stresses the layered qualities of the Renaissance self and the salient role of interiority and notions of inwardness in the shaping (...)
     
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  31.  26
    Brian Ogren (2009). Renaissance and Rebirth: Reincarnation in Early Modern Italian Kabbalah. Brill.
    This book addresses the problematic question of the roles and achievements of Jews who lived in Italy in the development of Renaissance culture in its Jewish ...
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  32.  55
    Erwin Panofsky (1961). Renaissance and Renascences in Western Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 19 (3):350-351.
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  33. James Hankins (2008). The Recovery of Ancient Philosophy in the Renaissance: A Brief Guide. L.S. Olschki.
  34. Charles B. Schmitt (1983). Aristotle and the Renaissance. Published for Oberlin College by Harvard University Press.
     
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  35.  4
    Neal Ward Gilbert (1960). Renaissance Concepts of Method. New York, Columbia University Press.
  36. Allen G. Debus (1978). Man and Nature in the Renaissance. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  37. Eckhard Kessler, Daniel A. Di Liscia & Charlotte Methuen (1997). Method and Order in Renaissance Philosophy of Nature the Aristotle Commentary Tradition. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  38. Jerrold E. Seigel (1968). Rhetoric and Philosophy in Renaissance Humanism. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.
     
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  39. Ian Maclean (1992). Interpretation and Meaning in the Renaissance the Case of Law. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  40. Ian Maclean (2002). Logic, Signs and Nature in the Renaissance the Case of Learned Medicine. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  41. Martin L. Pine (1986). Pietro Pomponazzi: Radical Philosopher of the Renaissance. Antenore.
     
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  42. Edward P. Mahoney (2000). Two Aristotelians of the Italian Renaissance Nicoletto Vernia and Agostino Nifo. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  43.  5
    Ernst Cassirer (1948/1967). The Renaissance Philosophy of Man. Chicago, University of Chicago Press.
    Francesco Petrarca, translated by H. Nachod: Introduction. A self-portrait. The ascent of Mont Ventoux. On his own ignorance and that of many others. A disapproval of an unreasonable use of the discipline of dialectic. An Averroist visits Petrarca. Petraca's aversion to Arab science. A request to take up the fight against Averroes.--Lorenzo Valla, translated by C.E. Trinkaus, Jr.: Introduction by C.E. Trinkaus, Jr. Dialogue on free will.--Marsilio Ficino, translated by J.L. Burroughs: Introduction, by J.L. Burroughs. Five questions concerning the (...)
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  44.  1
    Georgios Steiris (2010). Machiavelli’s Appreciation of Greek Antiquity and the Ideal of Renaissance. In Alexander Lee, Pit Peporte & Harry Schnitker (eds.), Renaissance? Perceptions of Continuity and Discontinuity in Europe, c.1300 - c.1550. Brill 81-94.
    In this article Machiavelli's attitude towards Greek antiquity and philosophy is presented and interpreted, in particular his preference to Sparta and his critical attitude towards Athens and also the way of perception on behalf of him for the general political influence of classical literature and philosophy. Finally, the special way he comprehends Renaissance, as this is expressed in Machiavelli’s philosophy of history, is presented.
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  45. Paul Oskar Kristeller (1996). Studies in Renaissance Thought and Letters, Iv. Edizioni di Storia E Letteratura.
  46.  17
    Ernst Cassirer (1953/1970). The Platonic Renaissance in England. New York,Gordian Press.
  47.  6
    S. K. Heninger (1974). Touches of Sweet Harmony: Pythagorean Cosmology and Renaissance Poetics. Huntington Library.
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  48. Eugene F. Rice (1973). The Renaissance Idea of Wisdom. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.
  49. Nancy S. Struever (1970). The Language of History in the Renaissance. Princeton, N.J.,Princeton University Press.
  50. Dominick A. Iorio (1991). The Aristotelians of Renaissance Italy a Philosophical Exposition. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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