Search results for 'Reparations for historical injustices' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael Robert Marrus (2006). Offical Apologies and the Quest for Historical Justice. Munk Centre for International Studies.score: 678.0
     
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  2. Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.) (2007). Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press.score: 666.0
    Reparations is an idea whose time has come. From civilian victims of war in Iraq and South America to descendents of slaves in the US to citizens of colonized nations in Africa and south Asia to indigenous peoples around the world--these groups and their advocates are increasingly arguing for the importance of addressing historical injustices that have long been either ignored or denied. This volume contributes to these debates by focusing the attention of a group of highly (...)
     
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  3. Richard Vernon (2012). Historical Redress: Must We Pay for the Past? Continuum.score: 660.0
    An introduction to the philosophical implications of the recent surge of political and ethical interest in historical redress.
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  4. Manfred Berg & Bernd Schäfer (eds.) (2009). Historical Justice in International Perspective: How Societies Are Trying to Right the Wrongs of the Past. Cambridge University Press.score: 585.0
    This book makes a valuable contribution to recent debates on redress for historical injustices by offering case studies from nine countries on five continents.
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  5. Platz Jeppe von & Reidy David A. (2006). The Structural Diversity of Historical Injustices. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):360-376.score: 548.0
    Driven by a sharp increase in claims for reparations, reparative justice has become a topic of academic debate. To some extent this debate has been marred by a failure to realize the complexity of reparative justice. In this essay we try to amend this shortcoming. We do this by developing a taxonomy of different kinds of wrongs that can underwrite claims to reparations. We identify four kinds of wrongs: entitlement violations, unjust exclusions from an otherwise acceptable system of (...)
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  6. Jeremy J. Sarkin & Carly Fowler (2008). Reparations for Historical Human Rights Violations: The International and Historical Dimensions of the Alien Torts Claims Act Genocide Case of the Herero of Namibia. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 9 (3):331-360.score: 526.5
    Between 1904 and 1908, German colonialists in German South West Africa (GSWA, known today as Namibia) committed genocide and other international crimes against two indigenous groups, the Herero and the Nama. From the late 1990s, the Herero have sought reparations from the German government and several German corporations for what occurred more than a hundred years ago. This article examines and contextualizes the issues concerning reparations for historical human rights claims. It describes and analyzes the events in (...)
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  7. Bashir Bashir (2012). Reconciling Historical Injustices: Deliberative Democracy and the Politics of Reconciliation. [REVIEW] Res Publica 18 (2):127-143.score: 520.0
    Deliberative democracy is often celebrated and endorsed because of its promise to include, empower, and emancipate otherwise oppressed and excluded social groups through securing their voice and granting them impact in reasoned public deliberation. This article explores the ability of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy to accommodate the demands of historically excluded social groups in democratic plural societies. It argues that the inclusive, transformative, and empowering potential of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy falters when confronted with particular types of (...) injustices. It falters because it pays little attention to the historical dimension of injustices and the demands to which it gives rise. The historical dimension of longstanding injustices, it is argued, gives rise to a set of distinctive demands, such as collective memory of exclusion, acknowledgement of historical injustices, taking responsibility, and offering apology and reparations for causing these injustices, which go beyond the type of democratic inclusion that is often offered by deliberative democracy. Yet, the solution is not to abandon the model of deliberative democracy. Quite the contrary, it remains a valuable basis for forward-looking political decision making. The article concludes that in order to achieve inclusive, empowering and transformative deliberation in consolidated democracies that have experienced historical injustices, the politics of reconciliation is indispensable. (shrink)
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  8. Pablo De Greiff (ed.) (2006). The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press.score: 480.0
    Offering the most comprehensive book-length study to-date of reparation programs, this handbook contains an innovative blend of case-study analysis, thematic papers, and national legislation documents from leading scholars and practitioners. This landmark work will make a genuine contribution to the theory and practice of reparations.
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  9. Barbara Rose Johnston & Susan Slyomovics (eds.) (2009). Waging War, Making Peace: Reparations and Human Rights. Left Coast Press.score: 468.0
     
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  10. Nahshon Perez (2011). On Compensation and Return: Can The 'Continuing Injustice Argument' for Compensating for Historical Injustices Justify Compensation for Such Injustices or the Return of Property? Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):151-168.score: 456.8
    This paper offers a critique of recent attempts, by George Sher and others to justify compensation to be paid to descendants of deceased victims of past wrongs. This recent attempt (the ‘continuing injustice argument’) is important as it endeavours to avoid some well-known critiques of previous attempts, such as the non-identity problem. Furthermore, this new attempt is grounded in individual rights, without invoking a more controversial collectivist assumption. The first step in this critique is to differentiate between compensation and restitution. (...)
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  11. David Boonin (2011). Should Race Matter?: Unusual Answers to the Usual Questions. Cambridge University Press.score: 456.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Thinking in black and white; 2. Repairing the slave reparations debate; 3. Advancing the slave reparations debate; 4. One cheer for affirmative action; 5. Two cheers for affirmative action; 6. Why I used to hate hate speech restrictions; 7. Why I still hate hate speech restrictions; 8. How to stop worrying and learn to love hate crime laws; 9. How to keep on loving hate crime laws; 10. Is racial profiling irrational?; 11. Is (...)
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  12. Janna Thompson (2009). Intergenerational Justice: Rights and Responsibilities in an Intergenerational Polity. Routledge.score: 420.0
    Focusing on contemporary social issues-- the environmental crisis, population growth and demographic change, and the question of whether reparations are owed to indigenous peoples--this study presents a theory of intergenerational justice that gives citizens duties to past and future generations, and explains what relationships between contemporary generations count as fair.
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  13. Janna Thompson, Taking Responsibility for the Past: Reparation and Historical Injustice.score: 415.0
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  14. J. Angelo Corlett (2003). Janna Thompson, Taking Responsibility for the Past: Reparation and Historical Injustice Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (4):291-293.score: 415.0
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  15. Michael Schefczyk (2011). Verantwortung Für Historisches Unrecht: Eine Philosophische Untersuchung. De Gruyter.score: 408.0
     
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  16. Thomas McCarthy (2004). Coming to Terms with Our Past, Part II: On the Morality and Politics of Reparations for Slavery. Political Theory 32 (6):750-772.score: 348.0
    There has recently been a surge of interest, theoretical and political, in reparations for slavery. This essay takes up several moral-political issues from that intensifying debate: how to conceptualize and justify collective compensation and collective responsibility, and how to establish a plausible connection between past racial injustices and present racial inequalities. It concludes with some brief remarks on one aspect of the very complicated politics of reparations: the possible effects of hearings and trials on the public memory (...)
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  17. Makoto Usami (2011). The Non-Identity Problem, Collective Rights, and the Threshold Conception of Harm. Tokyo Institute of Technology Department of Social Engineering Discussion Paper (2011-04):1-17.score: 306.0
    One of the primary views on our supposed obligation towards our descendants in the context of environmental problems invokes the idea of the rights of future generations. A growing number of authors also hold that the descendants of those victimized by historical injustices, including colonialism and slavery, have the right to demand financial reparations for the sufferings of their distant ancestors. However, these claims of intergenerational rights face theoretical difficulties, notably the non-identity problem. To circumvent this problem (...)
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  18. Makoto Usami (2011). Intergenerational Rights: A Philosophical Examination. In Patricia Hanna (ed.), An Anthology of Philosophical Studies, Vol. 5. Athens Institute of Education and Research.score: 306.0
    One of the primary views on our supposed obligation towards our descendants in the context of environmental problems invokes the idea of the rights of future generations. A growing number of authors also hold that the descendants of those victimized by historical injustices, including colonialism and slavery, have the right to demand financial reparations for the sufferings of their distant ancestors. However, these claims of intergenerational rights face theoretical difficulties, notably the non-identity problem. To circumvent this problem (...)
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  19. Juan Espindola & Moises Vaca (2014). The Problem of Historical Rectification for Rawlsian Theory. Res Publica 20 (3):227-243.score: 304.5
    In this paper we claim that Rawls’s theory is compatible with the absence of rectification of extremely important historical injustices within a given society. We hold that adding a new principle to justice-as-fairness may amend this problem. There are four possible objections to our claim: First, that historical rectification is not required by justice. Second, that, even when historical rectification is a matter of justice, it is not a matter of distributive justice, so that Rawls’s theory (...)
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  20. Karin Edvardsson Björnberg (forthcoming). Historic Injustices and the Moral Case for Cultural Repatriation. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-14.score: 294.0
    It is commonly argued that cultural objects ought to be returned to their place of origin in order to remedy injustices committed in the past. In this paper, it is shown that significant challenges attach to this way of arguing. Although there is considerable intuitive appeal in the idea that if somebody wrongs another person then she ought to compensate for that injustice, the principle is difficult (albeit not impossible) to apply to wrongdoings committed many decades or centuries ago. (...)
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  21. Janna Thompson (2006). Collective Responsibility for Historic Injustices. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):154–167.score: 283.5
    The article presents critical examination of theories about collective responsibility attempting to cover responsibility for historic injustices. The author will also try to establish the possibility of collective responsibility for the present members of the group to make recompense for the injustices committed by their ancestors depending on two factors expounded in the article.
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  22. Mathias Thaler (2012). Just Pretending: Political Apologies for Historical Injustice and Vice's Tribute to Virtue. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 15 (3):259-278.score: 283.5
    Should we be concerned with, or alarmed or outraged by, the insincerity and hypocrisy of politicians who apologize for historical injustice? This paper argues that the correct reply to this question is: sometimes, but not always. In order to establish what types of insincerity must be avoided, Judith Shklar?s hierarchy of ordinary vices is critically revisited. Against Shklar?s overly benign account of hypocrisy, the paper then tries to demonstrate that only institutional and harmful forms of hypocrisy must be rejected (...)
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  23. Jonathan Kaplan & Andrew Valls (2007). Housing Discrimination As a Basis for Black Reparations. Public Affairs Quarterly 21 (3):255-274.score: 265.5
    The renewed interest in the issue of black reparations, both in the public sphere and among scholars, is a welcome development because the racial injustices of the past continue to shape American society by disadvantaging African Americans in a variety of ways. Attention to the past and how it has shaped present-day inequality seems essential both to understanding our predicament and to justifying policies that would address and undermine racial inequality. Given this, any argument for policies designed to (...)
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  24. Barbara Ann Hocking, Scott Guy & Jason Grant Allen (2010). Three Sorries and You're In? Does the Prime Minister's Statement in the Australian Federal Parliament Presage Federal Constitutional Recognition and Reparations? Human Rights Review 11 (1):105-134.score: 263.0
    Then newly elected Labor Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd, made a historic statement of “Sorry” for past injustices to Australian Indigenous peoples at the opening of the 2008 federal parliament. In the long-standing absence of a constitutional ‘foundational principle’ to shape positive federal initiatives in this context, there has been speculation that the emphatic Sorry Statement may presage formal constitutional recognition. The debate is long overdue in a nation that only overturned the legal fiction of terra nullius and recognised native (...)
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  25. Andrew I. Cohen (2009). Compensation for Historic Injustices: Completing the Boxill and Sher Argument. Philosophy and Public Affairs 37 (1):81-102.score: 236.3
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  26. Geoffrey Scarre (2011). Apologising for Historic Injustices. In Christel Fricke (ed.), The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. Routledge.score: 236.3
     
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  27. Daniel Butt (2009). Rectifying International Injustice: Principles of Compensation and Restitution Between Nations. Oxford University Press.score: 228.0
    The history of international relations is characterized by widespread injustice. What implications does this have for those living in the present? Should contemporary states pay reparations to the descendants of the victims of historic wrongdoing? Many writers have dismissed the moral urgency of rectificatory justice in a domestic context, as a result of their forward-looking accounts of distributive justice. Rectifying International Injustice argues that historical international injustice raises a series of distinct theoretical problems, as a result of the (...)
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  28. John Morton (2006). The Cunning of Recognition: Indigenous Alterities and the Making of Australian Multiculturalism; Taking Responsibility for the Past: Reparation and Historical Justice. Thesis Eleven 85 (1):122-125.score: 222.5
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  29. Rael Strous (2011). 10 Historical Injustice in Psychiatry with Examples From Nazi Germany and Others–Ethical Lessons for the Modern Professional. In Thomas W. Kallert, Juan E. Mezzich & John Monahan (eds.), Coercive Treatment in Psychiatry: Clinical, Legal and Ethical Aspects. Wiley-Blackwell. 161.score: 222.5
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  30. Makoto Usami (2005). World Poverty and Justice Beyond Borders. Tokyo Institute of Technology Department of Social Engineering Discussion Paper (05-04):1-18.score: 216.5
    Most cosmopolitans who are concerned about world poverty assume that for citizens of affluent societies, justice beyond national borders is a matter of their positive duty to provide aid to distant people suffering from severe poverty. This assumption is challenged by some authors, notably Tomas Pogge, who maintains that these citizens are actively involved in the incidence of poverty abroad and therefore neglect their negative duty of refraining from harming others. This paper examines the extent to which it is pertinent (...)
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  31. Lance Wahlert (2013). Anti-Love or Anti-“Lifestyle”: Historical Reflections on Reparative Therapies for Homosexuality. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):36-38.score: 215.0
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  32. Margaret Urban Walker (2010). Truth Telling as Reparations. Metaphilosophy 41 (4):525-545.score: 214.0
    Abstract: International instruments now defend a "right to the truth" for victims of political repression and violence and include truth telling about human rights violations as a kind of reparation as well as a form of redress. While truth telling about violations is obviously a condition of redress or repair for violations, it may not be clear how truth telling itself is a kind of reparations. By showing that concerted truth telling can satisfy four features of suitable reparations (...)
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  33. David Reidy (2006). The Structural Diversity of Historical Injustices. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):360-376.score: 211.5
    Part of special issue of JSP on reparations. URL2 is a graph/figure that appears in the article but is here presented as a separate file. Article written with Jeppe von Platz.
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  34. Leif Wenar (2006). Reparations for the Future. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):396–405.score: 200.5
    All of these claims for reparations have mobilized popular support, and all share a degree of intuitive plausibility. The challenge to the theorist is to judge whether and which of such demands are grounded in sound principles of political normativity, so as to be able to select out the valid claims and to measure how the urgency of these claims compares with other demands on the public agenda. The most basic question for those considering the justifications of reparations (...)
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  35. Jon Miller, Review Essay.score: 198.0
    While a handful of scholars have probed the purported link between peace and justice, the notion that a sustainable peace is a just peace has become a mantra amongst many policymakers and civil society activists.1 Whether through formal, ad hoc or traditional means, confronting historical injustices is seen as essential to restoring the rule of law, creating honest and inclusive historical narratives, and enabling the coexistence of hostile groups by taming the desire for vengeance. In particular, (...) programmes are attracting increased interest from researchers and policymakers alike. Under international law, reparation encompasses three main types of remedy: restitution, financial compensation and satisfaction. Restitution aims to restore the conditions that existed prior to a violation, and often involves the return of homes, artefacts or land, while satisfaction addresses non-material injuries and may involve activities such as official apologies, judicial proceedings or truth and reconciliation commissions. Politically, reparations may be understood as the ‘entire spectrum of attempts to rectify historical injustices’. (shrink)
     
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  36. Duncan Ivison, Historical Injustice.score: 183.0
    Historical injustice is ubiquitous in human history. The origins of just about every institution relevant to human political life has a pedigree stained by injustices of various magnitudes. Slavery, genocide, mass expropriation of property, mass internment, indiscriminate killings of civilians and massive political repression are all depressingly familiar features of human history, both in the distant and more recent past. Should any of them be redressed? Can historical injustice be redressed? Should states be held accountable for their (...)
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  37. Jeff Spinner-Halev (2007). From Historical to Enduring Injustice. Political Theory 35 (5):574 - 597.score: 175.5
    Advocates of remedying historical injustices urge political communities to take responsibility for their past, but their arguments are ambiguous about whether all past injustices need remedy, or just those regarding groups that suffer from current injustice. This ambiguity leaves unanswered the challenge of critics who argue that contemporary injustices matter, not those in the past. I argue instead for a focus on injustices that have roots in the past, and continue to the present day, what (...)
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  38. Ding Weixiang (2013). The Realistic Actualization of the Moist Passion for Salvation and Its Historical Destination. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 8 (2):309-331.score: 168.0
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  39. H. P. P. Lotter (2005). Compensating for Impoverishing Injustices of the Distant Past. Politikon 32 (1):83-102.score: 163.0
    Calls for compensation are heard in many countries all over the world. Spokespersons on behalf of formerly oppressed and dominated groups call for compensation for the deeply traumatic injustices their members have suffered in the past. Sometimes these injustices were suffered decades ago by members already deceased. How valid are such claims to compensation and should they be honoured as a matter of justice? The focus of this essay is on these issues of compensatory justice. I want to (...)
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  40. Martin Kusch (2011). Reflexivity, Relativism, Microhistory: Three Desiderata for Historical Epistemologies. [REVIEW] Erkenntnis 75 (3):483-494.score: 162.0
    This paper tries to motivate three desiderata for historical epistemologies: (a) that they should be reflective about the pedigree of their conceptual apparatus; (b) that they must face up to the potentially relativistic consequences of their historicism; and (c) that they must not forget the hard-won lessons of microhistory (i.e. historical events must be explained causally; historical events must not be artificially divided into internal/intellectual and external/social “factors” or “levels”; and constructed series of homogenous events must not (...)
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  41. Hans-Jörg Rheinberger (2012). A Plea for a Historical Epistemology of Research. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (1):105-111.score: 162.0
    The paper approaches the topic of what a general philosophy of science could mean today from the perspective of a historical epistemology. Consequently, in a first step, the paper looks at the notion of generality in the sciences, and how it evolved over time, on the example of the life sciences. In the second part of the paper, the urgency of a general philosophy of science is located in the history of philosophy of science. Two attempts at the beginning (...)
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  42. Ronald Olufemi Badru (2010). Reparations for Africa. Cultura 7 (2):67-80.score: 162.0
    The paper adopts philosophical research methodologies of conceptual clarification, critical analysis, and extensive argumentation. It attempts to jointly employ African metaphysical and epistemological grounds to address the problem of finding appropriate justification for reparations for Africa on the issue of past slavery and slave trade. The paper states that the crux of the problem is how to formulate a coherent theoretical framework, which provides a strong connection between the direct victims of slavery and slave trade and their descendants in (...)
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  43. Ignazio Masulli (1997). Recurrences of Form in the Old World as Evidence of Collective Consciousness: A Hypothesis for Historical Research. World Futures 48 (1):191-211.score: 162.0
    (1997). Recurrences of form in the old world as evidence of collective consciousness: A hypothesis for historical research. World Futures: Vol. 48, The Concept of Collective Consiousness: Research Perspectives, pp. 191-211.
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  44. J. Allen & B. A. Hocking (2010). Unlocking the Alienation: A Comparative Role for Alien Torts Legislation in Post-Colonial Reparations Claims? [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 11 (2):247-276.score: 159.0
    This article continues the themes developed in a previous paper looking at reparations for past wrongs in post-colonial Australia. It narrows the focus to examine the scope of the law of tort to provide reparations suffered as a result of colonisation and dispossession, with particular emphasis on the assimilation policies whose legacy is now known emphatically, although it ought not be exclusively, as the Stolen Generations. The search for more than just words is particularly topical in light of (...)
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  45. NaomiZack Zack (2003). Reparations and the Rectification of Race. Journal of Ethics 7 (1):139-151.score: 157.5
    Positive law and problems with identifyingbeneficiaries confine reparations for U.S.slavery to the level of discourse. Within thediscourse, the broader topic of rectificationcan be addressed. The rectification of slaveryincludes restoring full humanity to our ideasof the slaves and their descendants and itrequires disabuse of the false biological ideaof race. This is not racial eliminativism,because biological race never existed, but moreimportantly because African American racialidentities and redress of present racism arebased on lifeworlds of race in contrast withwhich the biological idea has (...)
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  46. Birger Siebert (2005). Prospects for a Cultural-Historical Psychology of Intelligence. Studies in East European Thought 57 (3-4):305 - 317.score: 156.0
    The ideas of cultural-historical psychology have led to a new understanding of the human psyche as developing in the process of the subject acting in social and historical contexts. Such a “non-classical” reinterpretation of psychological concepts should be based on a theoretical and philosophical framework in order to explain genetic sources of these concepts. For this purpose, Il’enkov’s philosophy is of great significance. This is illustrated by discussing a possible cultural-historical understanding of the concept of intelligence.
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  47. Arno van Raak & Aggie Paulus (2008). The Emergence of Multidisciplinary Teams for Interagency Service Delivery in Europe: Is Historical Institutionalism Wrong? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (4):342-354.score: 156.0
    In Europe, a well-known problem is the coordination of interagency service delivery to independently living older persons, disabled persons or persons suffering from chronic illness. Coordination is necessary in order for the users to receive services at the appropriate time and place. Based on historical institutionalism, which focuses on the path dependency of the development of government policy and organizational and professional rules, it can be stated that coordination requires organizational models or other solutions that fit the characteristics of (...)
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  48. Xiang Chen (2002). The 'Platforms' for Comparing Incommensurable Taxonomies: A Cognitive-Historical Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 33 (1):1-22.score: 150.0
    This paper examines taxonomy comparison from a cognitive perspective. Arguments are developed by drawing on the results of cognitive psychology, which reveal the cognitive mechanisms behind the practice of taxonomy comparison. The taxonomic change in 19th-century ornithology is also used to uncover the historical practice that ornithologists employed in the revision of the classification of birds. On the basis of cognitive and historical analyses, I argue that incommensurable taxonomies can be compared rationally. Using a frame model to represent (...)
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  49. Thom Brooks (2008). A Two-Tiered Reparations Theory: A Reply to Wenar. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (4):666-669.score: 148.5
    This paper argues that Leif Wenar's theory of reparations is not purely forward-looking and that backward-looking considerations play an important role: if there had never been a past injustice, then reparations for the future cannot be acceptable. Past injustice compose the first part of a two-tiered theory of reparations. We must first discover a past injustice has taken place: reparations are for the repair of previous damage. However, for Wenar, not all past injustices warrant (...). Once we have first passed the initial test of demonstrating a past injustice has taken place, we then determine whether or not to finally accept reparations based upon forward-looking considerations. What is important to note is that this decision to award reparations is based upon forward-looking considerations, but only after first satisfying the test of a past injustice. Thus, backward-looking considerations make up an important first part of Wenar's two-tiered theory of reparations. It is not my argument that this theory is unsafe and I find Wenar's arguments both novel and highly compelling. However, the view that this theory is forward-looking -- and not backward-looking -- is not entirely accurate. My brief reply corrects this part of an important new theory of reparations in the hope of strengthening its persuasive power. (shrink)
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  50. Angelo Corlett (2012). Reparations for U.S. War Crimes Against Iraq. Filozofija I Društvo 23 (4):193-217.score: 147.0
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