Search results for 'Replication' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Bence Nanay (2011). Replication Without Replicators. Synthese 179 (455):477.score: 18.0
    According to a once influential view of selection, it consists of repeated cycles of replication and interaction. It has been argued that this view is wrong: replication is not necessary for evolution by natural selection. I analyze the nine most influential arguments for this claim and defend the replication–interaction conception of selection against these objections. In order to do so, however, the replication–interaction conception of selection needs to be modified significantly. My proposal is that replication (...)
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  2. Jutta Schickore (2012). What Does History Matter to Philosophy of Science? The Concept of Replication and the Methodology of Experiments. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):513-532.score: 18.0
    Abstract Scientists and philosophers generally agree that the replication of experiments is a key ingredient of good and successful scientific practice. “One-offs“ are not significant; experiments must be replicable to be considered valid and important. But the term “replication“ has been used in a number of ways, and it is therefore quite difficult to appraise the meaning and significance of replications. I consider how history may help - and has helped - with this task. I propose that: 1) (...)
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  3. Bence Nanay (2002). The Return of the Replicator: What is Philosophically Significant in a General Account of Replication and Selection? [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 17 (1):109-121.score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to outline a typologyof selection processes, and show that differentsub-categories have different explanatorypower. The basis of this typology of selectionprocesses is argued to be the difference ofreplication processes involved in them. Inorder to show this, I argue that: 1.Replication is necessary for selection and 2.Different types of replication lead todifferent types of selection. Finally, it isargued that this typology is philosophicallysignificant, since it contrasts cases ofselection (on the basis of the replicationprocesses involved (...)
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  4. B. Nanay (2002). The Return of the Replicator: What is Philosophically Significant in a General Account of Replication and Selection? [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy (1):109-121.score: 18.0
    The aim of this paper is to outline a typology of selection processes, and show that different sub-categories have different explanatory power. The basis of this typology of selection processes is argued to be the difference of replication processes involved in them. In order to show this, I argue that: 1. Replication is necessary for selection and 2. Different types of replication lead to different types of selection. Finally, it is argued that this typology is philosophically significant, (...)
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  5. Sara Steegen, Francis Tuerlinckx & Wolf Vanpaemel (forthcoming). Registered Replication Proposal: The Crowd Within. Frontiers in Psychology.score: 18.0
    The crowd within effect shows that the average of two estimates from one person is more accurate than a single estimate of that person. The effect implies that the well documented wisdom of the crowd effect - the crowd's average estimate tends to be more accurate than the individual estimates - can be obtained within a single individual. The crowd within effect has important theoretical and practical implications, resulting in a widespread attention in both academic and non-academic reports. Despite its (...)
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  6. Jerry Suls (2013). Using “Cinéma Vérité (Truthful Cinema) to Facilitate Replication and Accountability in Psychological Research. Frontiers in Psychology 4:872.score: 18.0
    To increase replication and accountability, it is proposed that researchers make audio/video recordings of laboratory protocols using currently available technologies, such as smart-phones. A detailed record of the procedure representing each experimental condition of the study design with simulated participants could then be posted on the internet and made accessible to researchers wanting more information about the procedures described in the research publication. Making recordings of all research participants a standard practice would be a greater challenge because of threats (...)
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  7. Stan Klein (forthcoming). What Can Recent Replication Failures Tell Us About the Theoretical Commitments of Psychology? Theory and Psychology.score: 16.0
    I suggest that the recent, highly visible, and often heated debate over failures to replicate the results in the social sciences reveals more than the need for greater attention to the pragmatics and value of empirical falsification. It also is a symptom of a serious issue -- the underdeveloped state of theory in many areas of psychology. While I focus on the phenomenon of “social priming” -- since it figures centrally in current debate -- it is not the only area (...)
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  8. Patrizio E. Tressoldi (2012). Replication Unreliability in Psychology: Elusive Phenomena or “Elusive” Statistical Power? Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 16.0
    The focus of this paper is to analyse whether the unreliability of results related to certain controversial psychological phenomena may be a consequence of their low statistical power. Applying the Null Hypothesis Statistical Testing (NHST), still the widest used statistical approach, unreliability derives from the failure to refute the null hypothesis, in particular when exact or quasi-exact replications of experiments are carried out. Taking as example the results of meta-analyses related to four different controversial phenomena, subliminal semantic priming, incubation effect (...)
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  9. Leonard M. Giambra (1971). Selection Strategies for Eight Concept Rules with Exemplar and Nonexemplar Start Cards: A Within-Subjects Replication. Journal of Experimental Psychology 87 (1):143-145.score: 15.0
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  10. Jaakko Lo Pohjoismäki & Steffi Goffart (2011). Of Circles, Forks and Humanity: Topological Organisation and Replication of Mammalian Mitochondrial DNA. Bioessays 33 (4):290-299.score: 15.0
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  11. Ira H. Bernstein, Vicki E. Amundson & Donald L. Schurman (1973). Metacontrast Inferred From Reaction Time and Verbal Report: Replication and Comments on the Fehrer-Biederman Experiment. Journal of Experimental Psychology 100 (1):195.score: 15.0
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  12. Kenneth O. Eck & David R. Thomas (1970). Discrimination Learning as a Function of Prior Discrimination and Nondifferential Training: A Replication. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (3p1):511.score: 15.0
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  13. John P. Houston (1971). Proactive Inhibition and Undetected Rehearsal: A Replication. Journal of Experimental Psychology 90 (1):156-157.score: 15.0
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  14. Zuzana Jasencakova & Anja Groth (2010). Replication Stress, a Source of Epigenetic Aberrations in Cancer? Bioessays 32 (10):847-855.score: 15.0
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  15. Frederick L. Kitterle & Harry Helson (1972). On the Inhibitory Effect of a Second Stimulus Following the Primary Stimulus to React: A Successful Replication. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (1):138.score: 15.0
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  16. Stuart T. Klapp (1974). Syllable-Dependent Pronunciation Latencies in Number Naming: A Replication. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (6):1138.score: 15.0
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  17. Ram Parikshan Kumar (2009). Polycomb Group Proteins: Remembering How to Catch Chromatin During Replication. Bioessays 31 (8):822-825.score: 15.0
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  18. Hisao Masai, Taku Tanaka & Daisuke Kohda (2010). Stalled Replication Forks: Making Ends Meet for Recognition and Stabilization. Bioessays 32 (8):687-697.score: 15.0
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  19. Benoit Miotto & Yacine Graba (2010). Control of DNA Replication: A New Facet of Hox Proteins? Bioessays 32 (9):800-807.score: 15.0
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  20. Joana Sequeira‐Mendes & María Gómez (2012). On the Opportunistic Nature of Transcription and Replication Initiation in the Metazoan Genome. Bioessays 34 (2):119-125.score: 15.0
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  21. Winifred Strange, Terrence Keeney, Frank S. Kessel & James J. Jenkins (1970). Abstraction Over Time of Prototypes From Distortions of Random Dot Patterns: A Replication. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (3, Pt.1):508-510.score: 15.0
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  22. Mathew J. Thayer (2012). Mammalian Chromosomes Contain Cis‐Acting Elements That Control Replication Timing, Mitotic Condensation, and Stability of Entire Chromosomes. Bioessays 34 (9):760-770.score: 15.0
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  23. Hamid Seyedsayamdost, On Normativity and Epistemic Intuitions: Failure of Replication.score: 12.0
    In one of the earlier influential papers in the field of experimental philosophy titled Normativity and Epistemic Intuitions published in 2001, Jonathan M. Weinberg, Shaun Nichols and Stephen Stich reported that respondents answered Gettier type questions differently depending on their ethnic background as well as socioeconomic status. There is currently a debate going on, on the significance of the results of Weinberg et al. (2001) and its implications for philosophical methodology in general and epistemology in specific. Despite the debates, however, (...)
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  24. Hamid Seyedsayamdost (forthcoming). On Gender and Philosophical Intuition: Failure of Replication and Other Negative Results. Philosophical Psychology.score: 12.0
    On gender and philosophical intuition: Failure of replication and other negative results. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2014.893288.
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  25. Blake H. Dournaee (2010). Comments on “The Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and Bio-AI”. Minds and Machines 20 (2):303-309.score: 12.0
    In their joint paper entitled The Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and BIO-AI (Boltuc et al. Replication of the hard problem of conscious in AI and Bio- AI: An early conceptual framework 2008), Nicholas and Piotr Boltuc suggest that machines could be equipped with phenomenal consciousness, which is subjective consciousness that satisfies Chalmer’s hard problem (We will abbreviate the hard problem of consciousness as H-consciousness ). The claim is that if we knew the inner (...)
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  26. H. M. Collins (1985/1992). Changing Order: Replication and Induction in Scientific Practice. University of Chicago Press.score: 12.0
    This fascinating study in the sociology of science explores the way scientists conduct, and draw conclusions from, their experiments. The book is organized around three case studies: replication of the TEA-laser, detecting gravitational rotation, and some experiments in the paranormal. "In his superb book, Collins shows why the quest for certainty is disappointed. He shows that standards of replication are, of course, social, and that there is (...)
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  27. David L. Hull & Sigrid S. Glenn (2004). Multiply Concurrent Replication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):902-904.score: 12.0
    If selection is interpreted as involving repeated cycles of replication, variation, and environmental interaction so structured that environmental interaction causes replication to be differential, then selection in gene-based biological evolution and the reaction of the immune system to antigens are relatively unproblematic examples of selection processes. Operant learning and cultural evolution pose more serious problems. In this response we deal with operant learning as a selection process. Footnotes1 The authors regretfully inform readers that since the publication of our (...)
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  28. William M. Baum (2001). Two Stumbling Blocks to a General Account of Selection: Replication and Information. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):528-528.score: 12.0
    When one takes the evolution of operant behavior as prototype, one sees that the term replication is too tied to the peculiarities of genetic evolution. A more general term is recurrence. The important problem raised by recurrence is not “information” but relationship: deciding when two occurrences belong to the same lineage. That is solved by looking at common environmental effects.
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  29. Geoffrey M. Hodgson & Thorbjørn Knudsen (2008). Information, Complexity and Generative Replication. Biology and Philosophy 23 (1):47-65.score: 12.0
    The established definition of replication in terms of the conditions of causality, similarity and information transfer is very broad. We draw inspiration from the literature on self-reproducing automata to strengthen the notion of information transfer in replication processes. To the triple conditions of causality, similarity and information transfer, we add a fourth condition that defines a “generative replicator” as a conditional generative mechanism, which can turn input signals from an environment (...)
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  30. Bruce Edmonds, Replication, Replication and Replication: Some Hard Lessons From Model Alignment.score: 12.0
    A published simulation model Riolo et al. 2001 ) was replicated in two independent implementations so that the results as well as the conceptual design align. This double replication allowed the original to be analysed and critiqued with confidence. In this case, the replication revealed some weaknesses in the original model, which otherwise might not have come to light. This shows that unreplicated simulation models and their results can not be trusted - as with other kinds of experiment, (...)
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  31. L. Bass (1977). Biological Replication by Quantum Mechanical Interactions. Foundations of Physics 7 (3-4):221-231.score: 12.0
    Wigner's quantum mechanical formulation of the problem of biological replication is examined with special reference to DNA. His necessary condition for replication is that the number of independent equations in his formulation should not exceed the number of unknowns. Explicit hypotheses concerning the relevant collision matrix are proposed without assuming biotonic modifications of quantum mechanics. Schrödinger's description of the gene as a low-temperature solid, combined with the concept of template, is given mathematical expression which fails to satisfy Wigner's (...)
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  32. Peter Godfrey-Smith (2001). The Role of Information and Replication in Selection Processes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):538-538.score: 12.0
    Hull et al. argue that information and replication are both essential ingredients in any selection process. But both information and replication are found in only some selection processes, and should not be included in abstract descriptions of selection intended to help researchers discover and describe selection processes in new domains.
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  33. Christian Agrillo & Maria Elena Miletto Petrazzini (2012). The Importance of Replication in Comparative Psychology: The Lesson of Elephant Quantity Judgments. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 12.0
    The Importance of Replication in Comparative Psychology: The Lesson of Elephant Quantity Judgments.
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  34. Shelia Catlett & Sherry R. Lovan (2011). Being a Good Nurse and Doing the Right Thing: A Replication Study. Nursing Ethics 18 (1):54-63.score: 12.0
    This qualitative research study, a replication of a study published in 2002, investigated the qualities of a good nurse and the role ethics plays in decision making. After reviewing the limitations of the published work, the current study implemented modifications related to the research questions, sample selection, data collection, and use of software for data analysis. The original study identified seven categories that related to being a good nurse and doing the right thing. In the present study, the use (...)
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  35. Michael Glassman (2001). Replication or Reproduction?: Symbiogenesis as an Alternative Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):537-538.score: 12.0
    This commentary takes issue with the idea that replication is a “fundamental element” in natural selection. Such an assumption is based on a traditional, mechanistic view of evolution. A symbiogenetic theory of evolution offers an alternative to traditional theories, emphasizing reproduction and qualitative development rather than replication and quantitative development. The issues raised by the symbiogenetic alternative may be extended to discussions of behavioral development.
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  36. George N. Reeke (2001). Replication in Selective Systems: Multiplicity of Carriers, Variation of Information, Iteration of Encounters. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):552-553.score: 12.0
    An analysis of biological selection aimed at deriving a mechanism-independent definition removes Hull et al.'s obligatory requirement for replication of the carriers of information, under conditions, such as those obtaining in the nervous system, where the information content of a carrier can be modified without duplication by an amount controlled by the outcome of interactions with the environment.
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  37. Alexei A. Sharov (1999). Hierarchical Approach to Replication and Selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):905-906.score: 12.0
    The major merit of Rose's book is the elaboration of the idea of multilevel causation in different explanatory languages. Yet Rose's critique of “ultra-Darwinism” is not convincing. Rose argues that activity and self-replication are properties of organisms rather than genes, which contradicts his idea of multilevel causation. Also, Rose fails to develop the concept of multilevel selection.
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  38. A. R. Singh & S. A. Singh (2003). Replicative Nature of Indian Research, Essence of Scientific Temper, and Future of Scientific Progress. Mens Sana Monographs 1 (4):3.score: 12.0
    A lot of Indian research is replicative in nature. This is because originality is at a premium here and mediocrity is in great demand. But replication has its merit as well because it helps in corroboration. And that is the bedrock on which many a fancied scientific hypothesis or theory stands, or falls. However, to go from replicative to original research will involve a massive effort to restructure the Indian psyche and an all round effort from numerous quarters. The (...)
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  39. S. Joyce Brotsky & Linda M. Litwin (1972). Semantic Generalization: Replication of Cramer's Associative Gradient. Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (2):430-432.score: 11.0
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  40. John Inglis (1999). Aquinas's Replication of the Acquired Moral Virtues: Rethinking the Standard Philosophical Interpretation of Moral Virtue in Aquinas. Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (1):3 - 27.score: 10.0
    Aquinas is often presented as following Aristotle's "Nicomachean Ethics" when treating moral virtue. Less often do philosophers consider that Aquinas's conception of the highest good and its relation to the functional character of human activity led him to break with Aristotle by replicating each of the acquired moral virtues on an infused level. The author suggests that we can discern reasons for this move by examining Aquinas's commentary on the "Sententiae" of Peter the Lombard and the "Summa theologiae" within their (...)
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  41. Luca Barlassina (2011). After All, It’s Still Replication: A Reply to Jacob on Simulation and Mirror Neurons. Res Cogitans 8 (1):92-111.score: 10.0
    Mindreading is the ability to attribute mental states to other individuals. According to the simulation theory (ST), mindreading is based on the ability the mind has of replicating others' mental states and processes. Mirror neurons (MNs) are a class of neurons that fire both when an agent performs a goal-directed action and when she observes the same type of action performed by another individual. Since MNs appear to form a replicative mechanism in which a portion of the observer's brain replicates (...)
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  42. Robert A. Peterson, Richard F. Beltramini & George Kozmetsky (1991). Concerns of College Students Regarding Business Ethics: A Replication. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 10 (10):733 - 738.score: 10.0
    In 1984 we reported the results of surveying a nationwide sample of college students about selected business ethics issues. We concluded that (a) college students were in general concerned about the issues investigated and (b) female students were relatively more concerned than were male students. The present study replicated our earlier study and not only corroborated both of its conclusions, but also found a higher level of concern than had been observed previously.
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  43. Liane Gabora (2004). Ideas Are Not Replicators but Minds Are. Biology and Philosophy 19 (1):127-143.score: 10.0
    An idea is not a replicator because it does not consist of coded self-assembly instructions. It may retain structure as it passes from one individual to another, but does not replicate it. The cultural replicator is not an idea but an associatively-structured network of them that together form an internal model of the world, or worldview. A worldview is a primitive, uncoded replicator, like the autocatalytic sets of polymers widely believed to be the earliest form of life. Primitive replicators generate (...)
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  44. J. Mattingly (2001). The Replication of Hertz's Cathode Ray Experiments. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 32 (1):53-75.score: 10.0
    I reappraise in detail Hertz's cathode ray experiments. I show that, contrary to Buchwald's (1995) evaluation, the core experiment establishing the electrostatic properties of the rays was successfully replicated by Perrin (probably) and Thomson (certainly). Buchwald's discussion of 'current purification' is shown to be a red herring. My investigation of the origin of Buchwald's misinterpretation of this episode reveals that he was led astray by a focus on what Hertz 'could do'-his experimental resources. I argue that one (...)
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  45. Mathias Osvath & Tomas Persson (2013). Great Apes Can Defer Exchange: A Replication with Different Results Suggesting Future Oriented Behavior. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 10.0
    The topic of cognitive foresight in non-human animals has received considerable attention in the last decade. The main questions concern whether the animals can prepare for upcoming situations which are, to various degrees, contextually or sensorially detached from the situation in which the preparations are made. Studies on great apes have focused on tool-related tasks, e.g. the ability to select a tool which is functional only in the future. Dufour and Sterck (2008), however, investigated whether chimpanzees were also able to (...)
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  46. James Weber & Julie E. Seger (2002). Influences Upon Organizational Ethical Subclimates: A Replication Study of a Single Firm at Two Points in Time. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):69 - 84.score: 10.0
    This research replicates Weber's 1995 study of a large financial services firm that found that ethical subclimates exist within multi-departmental organizations, are influenced by the function of the department and the stakeholders served, and are relatively stable over time. Relying upon theoretical models developed by Thompson (1967) and Victor and Cullen (1998), hypotheses are developed that predict the ethical subclimate decision-making dimensions and type for diverse departments within a large steel manufacturing firm and that these ethical subclimate types will be (...)
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  47. Andrée C. Ehresmann & Jean-Paul Vanbremeersch (2006). The Memory Evolutive Systems as a Model of Rosen's Organisms – (Metabolic, Replication) Systems. Axiomathes 16 (1-2):137-154.score: 9.0
    Robert Rosen has proposed several characteristics to distinguish “simple” physical systems (or “mechanisms”) from “complex” systems, such as living systems, which he calls “organisms”. The Memory Evolutive Systems (MES) introduced by the authors in preceding papers are shown to provide a mathematical model, based on category theory, which satisfies his characteristics of organisms, in particular the merger of the Aristotelian causes. Moreover they identify the condition for the emergence of objects and systems of increasing complexity. As an application, the cognitive (...)
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  48. David L. Hull, Rodney E. Langman & Sigrid S. Glenn (2001). A General Account of Selection: Biology, Immunology, and Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):511-528.score: 9.0
    Authors frequently refer to gene-based selection in biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, and operant learning as exemplifying selection processes in the same sense of this term. However, as obvious as this claim may seem on the surface, setting out an account of “selection” that is general enough to incorporate all three of these processes without becoming so general as to be vacuous is far from easy. In this target article, we set out such a general (...)
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  49. Nicholas Boltuc & Peter Boltuc (2007). Replication of the Hard Problem of Consciousness in AI and Bio-AI: An Early Conceptual Framework. In Anthony Chella & Ricardo Manzotti (eds.), AI and Consciousness: Theoretical Foundations and Current Approaches. AAAI Press, Merlo Park, CA.score: 9.0
    We should eventually understand how exactly first person phenomenal consciousness is generated. When we do, we should be able to enginner one for robots. This is the engineering thesis in machine consciousness.
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  50. David Magnus (1996). Heuristics and Biases in Evolutionary Biology. Biology and Philosophy 12 (1):21-38.score: 9.0
    Approaching science by considering the epistemological virtues which scientists see as constitutive of good science, and the way these virtues trade-off against one another, makes it possible to capture action that may be lost by approaches which focus on either the theoretical or institutional level. Following Wimsatt (1984) I use the notion of heuristics and biases to help explore a case study from the history of biology. Early in the 20th century, mutation theorists and natural historians fought over the role (...)
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