Search results for 'Republic' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Raphael Woolf (2009). Truth as a Value in Plato's Republic. Phronesis 54 (1):9-39.score: 24.0
    To what extent is possession of truth considered a good thing in the Republic ? Certain passages of the dialogue appear to regard truth as a universal good, but others are more circumspect about its value, recommending that truth be withheld on occasion and falsehood disseminated. I seek to resolve this tension by distinguishing two kinds of truths, which I label 'philosophical' and 'non-philosophical'. Philosophical truths, I argue, are considered unqualifiedly good to possess, whereas non-philosophical truths are regarded (...)
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  2. Julius Moravcsik (2001). Inner Harmony and the Human Ideal in Republic IV and IX. Journal of Ethics 5 (1):39-56.score: 24.0
    This paper presents an interpretation of Plato''s moral psychology in two books of the Republic that construes Plato as adopting a strong unity for the moral agent. Within this conception reason influences both emotion and action directly. This view is contrasted with the current prevailing interpretation according to which all three parts of the soul have their own reason, feeling, and desire. The latter construal is shown to be both philosophically weak, and less plausible as a historical reconstruction.
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  3. James Warren (2011). Socrates And The Patients: Republic IX, 583c-585a. Phronesis 56 (2):113-137.score: 24.0
    Republic IX 583c-585a presents something surprisingly unusual in ancient accounts of pleasure and pain: an argument in favour of the view that there are three relevant hedonic states: pleasure, pain, and an intermediate. The argument turns on the proposal that a person's evaluation of their current state may be misled by a comparison with a prior or subsequent state. The argument also refers to `pure' and anticipated pleasures. The brief remarks in the Republic may appear cursory or clumsy (...)
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  4. Andrew Payne (2011). The Division of Goods and Praising Justice for Itself in Republic II. Phronesis 56 (1):58-78.score: 24.0
    In Republic II Glaucon assigns to Socrates the task of praising justice for itself. What it means to praise justice for itself is unclear. A new interpretation is offered on the basis of an analysis of Glaucon's division of goods. A distinction is developed between criterial benefits, those valuable consequences of a thing which provide a standard for evaluating a thing as a good instance of its type, and fringe benefits, valuable consequences which do not provide such a standard. (...)
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  5. Chase Wrenn (2000). Being and Knowledge: A Connoisseur's Guide to Republic V.476e Ff. Apeiron 33 (2):87-108.score: 24.0
    This paper offers an interpretation of Plato's argument in Republic V that lovers of sights and sounds can have only opinion, and philosophers alone have legitimate claims to knowledge. The argument depends on the idea that knowledge is "set over what is" while mere opinion is "set over what is and is not." I argue for an enhanced veridical interpretation of 'to be' in this passage, on which 'what is' means, roughly, "what is so." Given a distinction between what (...)
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  6. Robert W. Cooper & Mark S. Dorfman (2003). Business and Professional Ethics in Transitional Economies and Beyond: Considerations for the Insurance Industries of Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 47 (4):381 - 392.score: 24.0
    This paper examines several key aspects of the ethical environment facing the insurance industries of Poland, The Czech Republic and Hungary as they complete the transition from Communist insurance systems built upon state-owned monopolies to viable private domestic insurance markets, and then seek to harmonize their markets with the single insurance market of the European Union. Since many types of ethical problems encountered during the transition are unlikely to diminish significantly as a result of either privatization or regulation of (...)
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  7. Gordon Francis Woodbine (2004). Moral Choice and the Declining Influence of Traditional Value Orientations Within the Financial Sector of a Rapidly Developing Region of the People's Republic of China. Journal of Business Ethics 55 (1):43 - 60.score: 24.0
    This paper describes the results of a field experiment involving 400 employees from ten financial institutions operating within the Shenzhen Special Economic Zone of the Peoples Republic of China. It was found that, when faced with an agency-based problem, employees indicated they would be less inclined to advise management of the existence of unethical work practices. Younger employees without supervisory experience displayed significant risk aversion. Traditional Chinese values associated with Confucian work dynamism, were shown to be poor predictors of (...)
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  8. Elisaveta Gjorgji Sardžoska & Thomas Li-Ping Tang (2009). Testing a Model of Behavioral Intentions in the Republic of Macedonia: Differences Between the Private and the Public Sectors. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 87 (4):495 - 517.score: 24.0
    In this study, we developed a model of unethical behavior intentions, collected data from managers of the private (n = 208) and the public (n = 307) sectors in the Republic of Macedonia, and tested our model across these two sectors. Results suggested that for both sectors, unethical behavior intentions were not related to the love of money and corporate ethical values, whereas irritation was negatively related to life satisfaction. Moreover, corporate ethical values were related to life satisfaction for (...)
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  9. Marion Thomas (2005). Are Animals Just Noisy Machines?: Louis Boutan and the Co-Invention of Animal and Child Psychology in the French Third Republic. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (3):425 - 460.score: 24.0
    Historians of science have only just begun to sample the wealth of different approaches to the study of animal behavior undertaken in the twentieth century. To date, more attention has been given to Lorenzian ethology and American behaviorism than to other work and traditions, but different approaches are equally worthy of the historian's attention, reflecting not only the broader range of questions that could be asked about animal behavior and the "animal mind" but also the different contexts in which these (...)
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  10. Vytautas Sinkevičius (2010). Removal of the President of the Republic From Office: Some Theoretical Aspects of the Constitutional Delict. Jurisprudence 122 (4):71-94.score: 24.0
    Under Article 74 of the Constitution, for gross violation of the Constitution or breach of oath, or if it transpires that a crime has been committed, the President of the Republic may be removed from office under procedure for impeachment proceedings. In the article the content of the constitutional delict is analysed. The President of the Republic may be brought to constitutional responsibility only for the actions which he committed while in office of the President of the (...). The President of the Republic may be removed from office not for any violation of the Constitution, but only for gross violation thereof. While implementing the powers established to him in the Constitution and laws, the President of the Republic may not breach the oath. Under Article 74 of the Constitution, the President of the Republic may be removed from office “if it transpires that a crime has been committed” – this provision means that the Constitution provides for the right of the Seimas to remove the President of the Republic from office in the absence of a court judgement recognising that the President of the Republic is guilty of commission of a crime. The Constitution commissions only the Constitutional Court to establish the fact of violation of the Constitution – whether there has been a gross violation of the Constitution and breach of oath by actions of the person. The Seimas may not change or question the conclusion of the Constitutional Court. On the grounds of the conclusion of the Constitutional Court that the actions of the President of the Republic are in conflict with the Constitution, it is only the Seimas that decides whether to remove the President of the Republic from office. The removal of the President of the Republic from office under procedure of impeachment proceedings due to a suspicion that the crime has been committed is not binding upon a court of general jurisdiction which considers the criminal case. (shrink)
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  11. Jan Kudrna (2012). The Question of Conducting Direct Elections of the President in the Czech Republic (A Live Issue for Already 20 Years). Jurisprudence 18 (4):1295-1321.score: 24.0
    The Czech Republic today belongs to the minority of European republics whose presidents are elected indirectly. It is a paradox that, even when direct election of the President has stable support not only of the majority of Czech society but also of the majority of parliamentary parties, this issue is constantly only discussed. Should direct election gain passage in the Czech Republic, there are formally better preconditions for this than there were in the past. With regard to the (...)
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  12. Jan Kudrna (2010). Cancellation of Early Elections by the Constitutional Court of the Czech Republic: Beginning of a New Concept of “Protection of Constitutionality”. Jurisprudence 122 (4):43-70.score: 24.0
    The ruling of the Constitutional Court of 10 September 2009 which repealed the proclaimed early elections to the Chamber of Deputies because of their alleged unconstitutionality fully manifests unjustifiability of the interference by the Constitutional Court of the Czech Republic. The decision directly interfered with the process of democratic re-establishment of the Chamber of Deputies. At the same time, the Court´s intervention was only made possible by violating a number of constitutionally prescribed rules. Finally, the respective ruling could not (...)
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  13. Josep F. Mària & Josep M. Lozano (2010). Responsible Leaders for Inclusive Globalization: Cases in Nicaragua and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):93 - 111.score: 24.0
    The current globalization process excludes a significant part of humanity, but organizations can contribute to a more inclusive form by means of dialogue with other organizations to create economic and social value. This article explores the main leadership traits (visions, roles and virtues) necessary for this dialogue. This exploration consists of a comparison between two theoretical approaches and their illustration with two cases. The theoretical approaches compared are Responsible Leadership, a management theory focused on the contribution of business leaders to (...)
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  14. Lukas Zagata (2010). How Organic Farmers View Their Own Practice: Results From the Czech Republic. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 27 (3):277-290.score: 24.0
    This paper addresses the development of organic agriculture in the Czech Republic, which is seen as a success story among post-communist countries. The relatively short history of organic farming and specific contextual factors raises questions about the nature and meaning of Czech organic farming. The goal of this study was to find out how farmers view their own practice, interpret its symbolic value, and construct its content. This empirical study uses Q methodology aimed at the identification of the collectively-shared (...)
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  15. Charles Geisler, Rees Warne & Alan Barton (1997). The Wandering Commons: A Conservation Conundrum in the Dominican Republic. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 14 (4):325-335.score: 24.0
    In contrast to the jeopardy caused to commonproperty regimes by conditions of open access, factorssuch as boundary ambiguity, shifts, and maintenancefailures are the causes of a different set of problemsin the Los Haitises National Park, a controversialprotected area in the Dominican Republic. Survey data,historical sources, and digital mapping informationoverlaying past boundary changes show that this areahas undergone two decades of design modifications inits perimeters. Despite a long history of communalownership in that country, there appears to be littlelikelihood of transforming (...)
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  16. Jan Kudrna (2009). Dissolution of the Chamber of Deputies in the Czech Republic – the Origin and Essence of Applicable Constitutional Legislation. Jurisprudence 117 (3):69-110.score: 24.0
    The constitutional system of the Czech Republic, which is established on the principles of a parliamentary form of government, takes into account the possibility of dissolving the Chamber of Deputies of the Parliament of the Czech Republic. The Chamber of Deputies is a chamber to which the government is accountable and this is the chamber in which the major part of the authority of Parliament is concentrated. Parliamentary systems have been also structured according to whether a certain amount (...)
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  17. Joshua Wilburn (forthcoming). Courage and the Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato's Republic. Philosophers' Imprint.score: 24.0
    In this paper I argue that the Republic’s account of courage remains committed to the view that knowledge, or even true belief, about how it is best to act is sufficient for correct behavior. I thus defend continuity between the Republic’s account of courage and that found in the Protagoras. I suggest that in the Republic Plato attempts to identify a psychic source of stability for belief, the spirited part of the soul, whose function in the virtue (...)
     
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  18. Joshua Wilburn (forthcoming). Is Appetite Ever 'Persuaded'?: An Alternative Reading of Republic 554c-D. History of Philosophy Quarterly.score: 24.0
    Republic 554c-d—where the oligarchic individual is said to restrain his appetites ‘by compulsion and fear’, rather than by persuasion or by taming them with speech—is often cited as evidence that the appetitive part of the soul can be ‘persuaded’. I argue that the passage does not actually support that conclusion. I offer an alternative reading and suggest that appetite, on Plato’s view, is not open to persuasion.
     
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  19. Miriam Byrd (2010). The Return of the Exile: The Benefits of Mimetic Literature in the Republic. In Robert Berchman John Finamore (ed.), Conversations Platonic and Neoplatonic. Academia Verlag.score: 21.0
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  20. Gerasimos Santas (2001). Plato's Criticism of the ``Democratic Man'' in the Republic. Journal of Ethics 5 (1):57-71.score: 21.0
    The article discusses two puzzles about Plato''s account of the democratic person: (1) unlike his account of the democratic city, his characterization of a democratic person is markedly incorrect. (2) His criticism of a person so characterized is criticism of a straw man. The article argues that the first puzzle is resolved if we see it as a result of Plato''s assumption that a democratic person is a person whose soul is isomorphic to a democratic constitution. Such a person has (...)
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  21. Dirk Baltzly (1997). Knowledge and Belief in Republic V. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 79 (S):239-72.score: 21.0
    We ought to combine the predicative and veridical readings of estin. Plato’s view involves a parallelism between truth and being: when we know, we grasp a logos which is completely true and is made true by an on which is completely (F). Opinion takes as its object a logos which is no more true than false and which concerns things which are no more (F) than not (F). This view, I argue, is intelligible in the context of the presuppositions which (...)
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  22. Era Gavrielides (2010). What Is Wrong with Degenerate Souls in the Republic? Phronesis 55 (3):203-227.score: 21.0
    At the beginning of Posterior Analytics 2.19 Aristotle reminds us that we cannot claim demonstrative knowledge ( epistêmê apodeiktikê ) unless we know immediate premisses, the archai of demonstrations. By the end of the chapter he explains why the cognitive state whereby we get to know archai must be Nous . In between, however, Aristotle describes the process of the acquisition of concepts, not immediate premisses. How should we understand this? There is a general agreement that it is Nous by (...)
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  23. Mark A. Johnstone (2011). Changing Rulers in the Soul: Psychological Transitions in Republic 8-9. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 41:139-67.score: 21.0
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  24. Pepijn Brandon (2011). Marxism and the 'Dutch Miracle': The Dutch Republic and the Transition-Debate. Historical Materialism 19 (3):106-146.score: 21.0
  25. Christopher Buckels (2013). Compulsion to Rule in Plato's Republic. Apeiron 46 (1):63-84.score: 21.0
    Journal Name: Apeiron Volume: 46 Issue: 1 Pages: 63-84.
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  26. Mario Vegetti (2012). Plato's The Republic, Book XI Editorial Introduction. Historical Materialism 20 (1):191-197.score: 21.0
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  27. David Greger (2012). When PISA Does Not Matter? The Case of the Czech Republic and Germany. Human Affairs 22 (1):31-42.score: 21.0
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  28. Saulius Katuoka & Andrius Bambalas (2011). Review of Decisions of the European Court of Human Rights in Cases Against the Republic of Lithuania in 2010. [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 18 (4):1641-1657.score: 21.0
    This article presents the review of the cases decided by the European Court of Human Rights against Lithuania during 2010. Authors provide the summary of relevant cases so that the potential reader is updated with the latest developments of human rights protection concerning Lithuania. Among other cases, this article reviews the case Cudak v. Lithuania decided by the Grand Chamber, which clarified the issues of restrictive principle of State immunity in employment disputes.
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  29. Jan Kudrna (2012). Human Rights – Real of Just Formal Rights? Example of the (Un)Constitutionality of Data Retention in the Czech Republic. Jurisprudence 19 (4):1289-1300.score: 21.0
    Approximately twenty years after it was necessary to fight for human rights, the time came when it was necessary to do it again. Or to begin at the very least to protect them very strongly and thoroughly in a preventive manner. Other methods and means will revert to time when human rights were formally anchored but their material establishment is not yet realized, or not at least to the extent expected corresponding to their real substance. The beginning of the 90’s (...)
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  30. Zena Hitz (2010). Degenerate Regimes in Plato's Republic. In Mark McPherran (ed.), Plato's Republic: A Critical Guide. Cambridge University Press.score: 21.0
    The essay concerns the negative end of the political argument of the Republic, that injustice—the rule of unreason—is both widespread and undesirable, and that whatever shadows of virtue or order might be found in its midst are corrupt and unstable. This claim is explained in detail in Republic 8 and 9. These passages explain recognizable faults in recognizable regimes in terms of the failure of the rule of reason and the corresponding success of the rule of non-rational forms (...)
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  31. Xie Hongwei (2009). Text and Power: A Study on Local Gazetteers of Wanzai County of Jiangxi Province From the Qing Dynasty to the Republic of China. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):426-459.score: 21.0
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  32. Huang Zhifan & Shao Hong (2009). The Life and Production of the Peasants in Huizhou From the Late Qing Dynasty to the Republic of China: The Analysis Based on 5 Day-to-Day Accounts in Wuyuan County. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (3):460-469.score: 21.0
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  33. G. R. F. Ferrari (2003/2005). City and Soul in Plato's Republic. University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
    Tracing a central theme of Plato's Republic , G. R. F. Ferrari reconsiders in this study the nature and purpose of the comparison between the structure of society and that of the individual soul. In four chapters, Ferrari examines the personalities and social status of the brothers Glaucon and Adeimantus, Plato's notion of justice, coherence in Plato's description of the decline of states, and the tyrant and the philosopher king—a pair who, in their different ways, break with the terms (...)
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  34. Christopher Bobonich (2007). Why Should Philosophers Rule? Plato's Republic and Aristotle's Protrepticus. Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (2):153-175.score: 18.0
    I examine Plato's claim in the Republic that philosophers must rule in a good city and Aristotle's attitude towards this claim in his early, and little discussed, work, the Protrepticus. I argue that in the Republic, Plato's main reason for having philosophers rule is that they alone understand the role of philosophical knowledge in a good life and how to produce characters that love such knowledge. He does not think that philosophic knowledge is necessary for getting right the (...)
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  35. Jyl Gentzler (2005). How to Know the Good: The Moral Epistemology of Plato's Republic. Philosophical Review 114 (4):469-496.score: 18.0
    John Mackie famously dismissed the rational tenability of moral objectivism with two quick arguments. The second, the so-called “argument from queerness,” proceeds as follows. A commitment to moral objectivism brings with it a commitment to the existence of moral properties as “queer” as Platonic Forms that are apprehended only through occult faculties like so-called “moral intuition” (Mackie 1977, 38). Since we have no reason to believe that there is any faculty such as moral intuition that serves as a reliable Form (...)
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  36. Tuncay Saygin (2008). “SECULARISM” FROM THE LAST YEARS OF THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE TO THE EARLY TURKISH REPUBLIC. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (20):26-78.score: 18.0
    The main aim of this article is to discuss both the concept of secularism among the Ottoman intellectuals and the principle of secularism during the period of the Turkish Republic based on ideas rather than practice. We can analyze “secularism in Turkey” in two separate periods of time: First, “The Ottoman Empire and Secularism” which discusses the ideas of secularism before the foundation of the Turkish Republic, and second “A Brief Analysis of the Turkish Republic and the (...)
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  37. C. D. C. Reeve (1988/2006). Philosopher-Kings: The Argument of Plato's Republic. Hackett Pub. Co..score: 18.0
    Reeve's classic work provides an interpretation of Republic that makes a case for the coherence of Plato's argument.
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  38. Gerasimos Xenophon Santas (ed.) (2006). The Blackwell Guide to Plato's Republic. Blackwell Pub..score: 18.0
    The Blackwell Guide to Plato’s Republic consists of thirteen new essays written by both established scholars and younger researchers with the specific aim of helping readers to understand Plato’s masterwork. This guide to Plato’s Republic is designed to help readers understand this foundational work of the Western canon. Sheds new light on many central features and themes of the Republic. Covers the literary and philosophical style of the Republic; Plato’s theories of justice and knowledge; his educational (...)
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  39. Stephen Buckle (2002). Aristotle's Republic or, Why Aristotle's Ethics is Not Virtue Ethics. Philosophy 77 (4):565-595.score: 18.0
    Modern virtue ethics is commonly presented as an alternative to Kantian and utilitarian views—to ethics focused on action and obligations—and it invokes Aristotle as a predecessor. This paper argues that the Nichomachean Ethics does not represent virtue ethics thus conceived, because the discussion of the virtues of character there serves a quasi-Platonic psychology: it is an account of how to tame the unruly (non-rational) elements of the human soul so that they can be ruled by reason and the laws it (...)
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  40. Michael Morris (2006). Akrasia in the "Protagoras" and the "Republic&Quot;. Phronesis 51 (3):195 - 229.score: 18.0
    Although it is a commonplace that the "Protagoras" and the "Republic" present diffent views of akrasia, the nature of the difference is not well understood. I argue that the logic of the famous argument in the "Protagoras" turns just on two crucial assumptions: that desiring is having evaluative beliefs (or that valuing is desiring), and that no one can have contradictory preferences at the same time; hedonism is not essential to the logic of the argument. And the logic of (...)
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  41. Colin Farrelly, Does Rawls Support the Procedural Republic? A Procedural Republic? A Critical Response to Critical Response to Sandel's Democracy's Discontent.score: 18.0
    In Michael Sandel's latest book entitled ican republicanism, Aristotle, and Hegel, com- Democracy's Discontent (1996), he argues munitarians are critical of the individualistic that the prevailing public philosophy (what he methodology liberalism employs. Such a methcalls the procedural republic) that informs..
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  42. David C. Lee (2010). Interpreting Plato's Republic: Knowledge and Belief. Philosophy Compass 5 (10):854-864.score: 18.0
    A distinction between knowledge and belief is set out and justified at the end of Book V of Plato’s Republic. The justification is intended to establish the claim of the philosophers to rule in an ideal state. I set out the argument and explain why considerable disagreement remains about the nature of the distinction and the assumptions on which it rests. I discuss the main options for interpreting the justification, briefly assessing their strengths and weaknesses. I conclude with comments (...)
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  43. Eric Brown, Plato's Ethics and Politics in the Republic. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 18.0
    Plato's Republic centers on a simple question: is it always better to be just than unjust? The puzzles in Book One prepare for this question, and Glaucon and Adeimantus make it explicit at the beginning of Book Two. To answer the question, Socrates takes a long way around, sketching an account of a good city on the grounds that a good city would be just and that defining justice as a virtue of a city would help to define justice (...)
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  44. Stephen Leeds (2008). Causation, Physics and the Constitution of Reality: Russell's Republic Revisited. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 86 (4):688 – 690.score: 18.0
    (2008). Causation, Physics and the Constitution of Reality: Russell's Republic Revisited. Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 86, No. 4, pp. 688-690.
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  45. Julia Annas (1981). An Introduction to Plato's Republic. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This interpretive introduction provides unique insight into Plato's Republic. Stressing Plato's desire to stimulate philosophical thinking in his readers, Julia Annas here demonstrates the coherence of his main moral argument on the nature of justice, and expounds related concepts of education, human motivation, knowledge and understanding. In a clear systematic fashion, this book shows that modern moral philosophy still has much to learn from Plato's attempt to move the focus from questions of what acts the just person ought to (...)
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  46. J. R. Lucas, An Engagement with Plato's Republic.score: 18.0
    Plato was politically incorrect---gloriously incorrect: hard to ignore and difficult to refute. Read An Engagement with Plato's Republic to argue with him or against him, for contemporary orthodoxies or against them. ``Plato was the first feminist. Women were the same as men, only not so good.''.
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  47. G. R. F. Ferrari (ed.) (2007). The Cambridge Companion to Plato's Republic. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    This Companion provides a fresh and comprehensive account of this outstanding work, which remains among the most frequently read works of Greek philosophy, indeed of Classical antiquity in general. The sixteen essays, by authors who represent various academic disciplines, bring a spectrum of interpretive approaches to bear in order to aid the understanding of a wide-ranging audience, from first-time readers of the Republic who require guidance, to more experienced readers who wish to explore contemporary currents in the work’s interpretation. (...)
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  48. Christopher Shields (2007). Forcing Goodness in Plato's Republic. Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (2):21-39.score: 18.0
    Among the instances of apparent illiberality in Plato's Republic, one stands out as especially curious. Long before making a forced return to the cave, and irrespective of the kinds of compulsion operative in such a homecoming, the philosopher-king has been compelled to apprehend the Good (Rep. VII.519c5-d2, 540a3-7). Why should compulsion be necessary or appropriate in this situation? Schooled intensively through the decades for an eventual grasping of the Good, beginning already with precognitive training in music and art calculated (...)
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  49. John Douglas Minyard (1985). Lucretius and the Late Republic: An Essay in Roman Intellectual History. E.J. Brill.score: 18.0
    LUCRETIUS AND THE LATE REPUBLIC . Roman Intellectual History The history of human values is the history of changing notions about truth and reality, ...
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  50. Sarah Lublink (2011). Who May Live the Examined Life? Plato's Rejection of Socratic Practices in Republic VII. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 19 (1):3-18.score: 18.0
    In Republic VII Plato has Socrates make a curious argument: dialectic as currently practiced causes lawlessness, and thus the practice of dialectic should be restricted to those of a certain age who have been properly trained and selected (537e-539e). I argue that the warning in Republic VII points to a disagreement between the views expressed by the character `Socrates' in the Republic, and the views expressed by the character `Socrates' in the Apology. I do so by showing (...)
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