Search results for 'Requests' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. R. Sala & D. Manara (2001). Nurses and Requests for Female Genital Mutilation: Cultural Rights Versus Human Rights. Nursing Ethics 8 (3):247-258.score: 18.0
    In this article we focus on female genital mutilation. We analyse this problem as one of the most important issues of multiculturalism, which is also coming to the attention of the public in Italy as a consequence of the growing number of immigrants from African countries. The fundamental problem is about the acceptability of this practice: can female genital mutilation be permitted and, if so, on what basis? We will try to cope with this as a genuine conflict between culture-relative (...)
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  2. B. Kopala & S. L. Kennedy (1998). Requests for Assisted Suicide: A Nursing Issue. Nursing Ethics 5 (1):16-26.score: 18.0
    At the heart of the debate over assisted suicide is the recognition that not all persons can be healed and not all suffering can be relieved. This article addresses the ethical, professional and legal issues to be considered by the nurses in the United States who are facing patients’ requests for assisted suicide. Both personal and professional risks, and the consequences of an action must be evaluated. Ultimately, a decision is based on some ranking of: patient values; personal values (...)
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  3. R. D. Orr & L. B. Genesen (1997). Requests for "Inappropriate" Treatment Based on Religious Beliefs. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (3):142-147.score: 18.0
    Requests by patients or their families for treatment which the patient's physician considers to be "inappropriate" are becoming more frequent than refusals of treatment which the physician considers appropriate. Such requests are often based on the patient's religious beliefs about the attributes of God (sovereignty, omnipotence), the attributes of persons (sanctity of life), or the individual's personal relationship with God (communication, commands, etc). We present four such cases and discuss some of the basic religious tenets of the three (...)
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  4. G. DuVal (2001). What Triggers Requests for Ethics Consultations? Journal of Medical Ethics 27 (suppl 1):24-29.score: 18.0
    Objectives—While clinical practice is complicated by many ethical dilemmas, clinicians do not often request ethics consultations. We therefore investigated what triggers clinicians' requests for ethics consultation. Design—Cross-sectional telephone survey.Setting—Internal medicine practices throughout the United States.Participants—Randomly selected physicians practising in internal medicine, oncology and critical care.Main measurements—Socio-demographic characteristics, training in medicine and ethics, and practice characteristics; types of ethical problems that prompt requests for consultation, and factors triggering consultation requests. Results—One hundred and ninety of 344 responding physicians (55%) (...)
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  5. Ilana Levene & Michael Parker (2011). Prevalence of Depression in Granted and Refused Requests for Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: A Systematic Review. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (4):205-211.score: 18.0
    Next SectionBackground There is an established link between depression and interest in hastened death in patients who are seriously ill. Concern exists over the extent of depression in patients who actively request euthanasia/physician-assisted suicide (PAS) and those who have their requests granted. Objectives To estimate the prevalence of depression in refused and granted requests for euthanasia/PAS and discuss these findings. Methods A systematic review was performed in MEDLINE and PsycINFO in July 2010, identifying studies reporting rates of depression (...)
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  6. Marc Aguert & Virginie Laval (2013). Request Complexity is No More a Problem When the Requests Are Ironic. Pragmatics and Cognition 21 (2):329-339.score: 18.0
    Although the topic has been extensively studied, many issues about understanding of indirect requests in children are still unsolved. Our contribution is to distinguish genuine and ironic hints, focusing on the latter. We examined the understanding of ironic hints and ironic imperatives in 5- to 9-year-old children and in adults, in various situational contexts . The main result of this study was that ironic hints were more difficult to understand than ironic imperatives only when the context was neutral. When (...)
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  7. Marion Danis, Adrienne Farrar, Christine Grady, Carol Taylor, Patricia O'Donnell, Karen Soeken & Connie Ulrich (2008). Does Fear of Retaliation Deter Requests for Ethics Consultation? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (1):27-34.score: 18.0
    BackgroundReports suggest that some health care personnel fear retaliation from seeking ethics consultation. We therefore examined the prevalence and determinants of fear of retaliation and determined whether this fear is associated with diminished likelihood of consulting an ethics committee.MethodsWe surveyed registered nurses (RNs) and social workers (SWs) in four US states to identify ethical problems they encounter. We developed a retaliation index (1–7 point range) with higher scores indicating a higher perceived likelihood of retaliation. Linear regression analysis was performed to (...)
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  8. Gaile Pohlhaus (2011). Wrongful Requests and Strategic Refusals to Understand. In Feminist Epistemology and Philosophy of Science: Power in Knowledge.score: 18.0
    In The Alchemy of Race and Rights Patricia Williams notes that when people of color are asked to understand such practices as racial profiling by putting themselves in the shoes of white people, they are, in effect, being asked to, ‘look into the mirror of frightened white faces for the reality of their undesirability’ (1992, 46). While we often see understanding another as ethically and epistemically virtuous, in this paper I argue that it is wrong in some cases to ask (...)
     
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  9. Achim Schützwohl, Amrei Fuchs, William F. McKibbin & Todd K. Shackelford (2009). How Willing Are You to Accept Sexual Requests From Slightly Unattractive to Exceptionally Attractive Imagined Requestors? Human Nature 20 (3):282-293.score: 18.0
    In their classic study of differences in mating strategies, Clark and Hatfield (1989, Journal of Psychology and Human Sexuality, 2, 39–54) found that men and women demonstrated a striking difference in interest in casual sex. The current study examined the role of an imagined requestor’s physical attractiveness (slightly unattractive, moderately attractive, and exceptionally attractive) on men’s and women’s willingness to accept three different requests (go out, come to apartment, go to bed) as reflected in answers to a questionnaire. We (...)
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  10. Bregje D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Gerrit van Der Wal & Lode Wigersma (2000). Consultation and Discussion with Other Physicians in Cases of Requests for Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide Refused by Family Physicians. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (03):381-390.score: 16.0
    In the Netherlands, in 1995 approximately 9700 people explicitly requested euthanasia or assisted suicide (EAS), and EAS was performed approximately 3600 times (2.7% of all deaths). The most important reasons for not performing EAS when requested by a patient were that the patient died before EAS was performed, or that the physician refused the request.
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  11. Nafsika Athanassoulis (2006). Unusual Requests and the Doctor-Patient Relationship. Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (2-3):259-278.score: 15.0
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  12. Geoffrey Cupit (1994). How Requests (and Promises) Create Obligations. Philosophical Quarterly 44 (177):439-455.score: 15.0
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  13. Daniel O. Dugan (1995). Praying for Miracles: Practical Responses to Requests for Medically Futile Treatments in the Icu Setting. HEC Forum 7 (4):228 - 242.score: 15.0
  14. Paul Schotsmans & Chris Gastmans (2009). How to Deal with Euthanasia Requests: A Palliative Filter Procedure. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 18 (04):420-.score: 15.0
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  15. C. Gastmans (2004). Facing Requests for Euthanasia: A Clinical Practice Guideline. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (2):212-217.score: 15.0
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  16. John J. Paris & Frank E. Reardon (1992). Physician Refusal of Requests for Futile or Ineffective Interventions. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (02):127-.score: 15.0
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  17. J.-J. Georges, A. M. The, B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen & G. van Der Wal (2008). Dealing with Requests for Euthanasia: A Qualitative Study Investigating the Experience of General Practitioners. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):150-155.score: 15.0
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  18. J. J. M. van Delden (2004). The Unfeasibility of Requests for Euthanasia in Advance Directives. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):447-451.score: 15.0
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  19. Jennifer A. Parks (2000). Why Gender Matters to the Euthanasia Debate: On Decisional Capacity and the Rejection of Women's Death Requests. Hastings Center Report 30 (1):30-36.score: 15.0
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  20. Tom L. Beauchamp (1996). Refusals of Treatment and Requests for Death. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (4):371-374.score: 15.0
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  21. John Alan Cohan (2002). A Fiduciary Model of Political Ethics and Protocol for Dealing with Constituent Requests. Journal of Business Ethics 38 (3):277 - 290.score: 15.0
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  22. H. Onur Bodur, Kimberly M. Duval & Bianca Grohmann (forthcoming). Will You Purchase Environmentally Friendly Products? Using Prediction Requests to Increase Choice of Sustainable Products. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 15.0
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  23. C. L. Crichton (1983). Requests for Euthanasia in General Practice. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (3):181-181.score: 15.0
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  24. Heidi Malm (2009). On Patient Requests for Unproven Screening: Dim Guidance for Screening in the Dark. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (4):15-17.score: 15.0
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  25. G. Withers (1983). Requests for Euthanasia in General Practice. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (4):231-231.score: 15.0
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  26. K. Anstey & L. Wright (2014). Responding to Discriminatory Requests for a Different Healthcare Provider. Nursing Ethics 21 (1):86-96.score: 15.0
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  27. Jurrit Bergsma (1992). Two Responses to “Physician Refusal of Requests for Futile or Ineffective Interventions,” by John J. Paris and Frank E. Reardon (CQ Vol. 1, No. 2, Pp. 127–134). [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (03):239-.score: 15.0
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  28. Ron Epstein, The Professor Requests a Lecture From the Monk in the Grave.score: 15.0
    I greatly enjoy meeting with all of you today, because I see you are all especially capable and intelligent young people. In the future you certainly can help America to be even better; you can cause its glory to be even greater. Today I would like to thank Professor Lancaster very much for inviting me here to meet with all of you. I fully see this professor's methods, by which he is able to cause your knowledge to increase daily. So, (...)
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  29. M. Jonas, A. Kolbe & B. Warin (2014). Publish or Be Damned: Individual Funding Requests and the Publicity Condition. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (12):827-831.score: 15.0
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  30. Anne-Marie Slowther (2006). Patient Requests for Specific Treatments. Clinical Ethics 1 (3):135-137.score: 15.0
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  31. Birte Asmuß (2007). What Do People Expect From Public Services? Requests in Public Service Encounters. Hermes 38:65-83.score: 15.0
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  32. Leigh C. Bishop, Robert D. Orr & Dennis Leon (1995). Refusals Involving Requests. Hastings Center Report 25 (4):4-4.score: 15.0
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  33. Herbert H. Clark & Dale H. Schunk (1981). Politeness in Requests: A Rejoinder to Kemper and Thissen. Cognition 9 (3):311-315.score: 15.0
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  34. Edmund G. Howe (2012). How Should Careproviders Respond to Patients' Requests That May Be Refused? Journal of Clinical Ethics 23 (2):99.score: 15.0
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  35. J. Johnson & C. Mitchell (2000). Responding to Parental Requests to Forego Pediatric Nutrition and Hydration. Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (2):128.score: 15.0
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  36. Lisa Leitten, Mary Lee A. Jensvold, Roger S. Fouts & Jason M. Wallin (2012). Contingency in Requests of Signing Chimpanzees (Pan Troglodytes). Interaction Studies 13 (2):147-164.score: 15.0
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  37. Alex C. Michalos (2013). Erratum To: A Fiduciary Model of Political Ethics and Protocol for Dealing with Constituent Requests. Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):427-427.score: 15.0
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  38. Nahshon Perez (2009). Cultural Requests and Cost Internalization. Social Theory and Practice 35 (2):201-228.score: 15.0
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  39. R. J. Boyle (2004). Ethics of Refusing Parental Requests to Withhold or Withdraw Treatment From Their Premature Baby. Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (4):402-405.score: 15.0
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  40. Mitri E. Shanab & Pamela J. O'Neill (1982). The Effects of Self-Perception and Perceptual Contrast Upon Compliance with Socially Undesirable Requests. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 19 (5):279-281.score: 15.0
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  41. W. M. Kong (2005). Legitimate Requests and Indecent Proposals: Matters of Justice in the Ethical Assessment of Phase I Trials Involving Competent Patients. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (4):205-208.score: 15.0
  42. David G. Barry (1977). AIBS Report: Public Responsibilities Chairman Requests Response From Life Scientists. BioScience 27 (11):746-746.score: 15.0
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  43. A. R. Boon (1981). Antenatal Genetic Diagnosis in Newcastle: Experience of 1200 Requests. Journal of Biosocial Science 13 (1).score: 15.0
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  44. H. Clark (1980). Polite Responses to Polite Requests. Cognition 8 (2):111-143.score: 15.0
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  45. Saeko Fukushima (2009). Hearer's Aspect in Politeness: The Case of Requests. In Dingfang Shu & Ken Turner (eds.), Contrasting Meanings in Languages of the East and West. Peter Lang.score: 15.0
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  46. Ivo de Gennaro & Hans-Christian Günther (2009). Artists and Intellectuals and the Requests of Power. Brill.score: 15.0
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  47. J. J. Georges, B. D. Onwuteaka-Philipsen & G. van Der Wal (2008). Dealing with Requests for Euthanasia: A Qualitative Study Investigating the Experience of General Practitioners. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):150-155.score: 15.0
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  48. Bernard Gert, James L. Bernat & R. Peter Mogielnicki (1994). Distinguishing Between Patients' Refusals and Requests. Hastings Center Report 24 (4):13-15.score: 15.0
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  49. B. Gert, Jl Bernat & Rp Mogielnicki (1995). Refusals Involving Requests-Reply. Hastings Center Report 25 (4):4-4.score: 15.0
     
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