Search results for 'Research Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  10
    E. F. Bradley & O. T. Denmead (eds.) (1967). The Collection and Processing of Field Data. New York, Interscience Publishers.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Tord H. Ganelius (ed.) (1986). Progress in Science and its Social Conditions: Nobel Symposium 58, Held at Lidingö, Sweden, 15-19 August 1983. Published for the Nobel Foundation by Pergamon Press.
  3. Sanford A. Lakoff (ed.) (1980). Science and Ethical Responsibility: Proceedings of the U.S. Student Pugwash Conference, University of California, San Diego, June 19-26, 1979. [REVIEW] Addison-Wesley Pub. Co..
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Edward L. Keenan (ed.) (1975). Formal Semantics of Natural Language: Papers From a Colloquium Sponsored by the King's College Research Centre, Cambridge. Cambridge University Press.
  5. Peter D. Asquith & Henry Ely Kyburg (eds.) (1979). Current Research in Philosophy of Science: Proceedings of the P.S.A. Critical Research Problems Conference. Philosophy of Science Association.
  6. Zbigniew Bańkowski & Robert J. Levine (eds.) (1993). Ethics and Research on Human Subjects: International Guidelines: Proceedings of the Xxvith Cioms Conference, Geneva, Switzerland, 5-7 February 1992. [REVIEW] Cioms.
  7. Simon Btesh (ed.) (1972). Recent Progress in Biology and Medicine, its Social and Ethical Implications: Proceedings of a Round Table Conference on Science Policy and Biomedical Research, Unesco House, Paris, 4-6 September, 1972 = les Récents Progrès De La Biologie Et De La Médecine Et Leur Portée Sociale Et Éthique: Comptes Rendus Du Colloque Sur La Politique Scientifique Et La Recherche Biomédicale, Maison De L'unesco, Paris, 4-6 Septembre, 1972. [REVIEW] Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. John N. Crossley (ed.) (1975). Algebra and Logic: Papers From the 1974 Summer Research Institute of the Australian Mathematical Society, Monash University, Australia. Springer-Verlag.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. János Farkas (ed.) (1979). Sociology of Science and Research. Akadémiai Kiadó.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. D. Hawks (ed.) (1993). What Are the Proper Limits for Government Intervention in Our Lifestyles?: A Symposium Jointly Convened by the National Centre for Research Into the Prevention of Drug Abuse and the Kingswood Centre for Applied Ethics. Curtin University of Technology.
  11. Kenneth G. Johnson (ed.) (1974). Research Designs in General Semantics: [Papers Presented at the First Conference on Research Designs in General Semantics]. Gordon and Breach Science Publishers.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. J. D. Keehn (ed.) (1982). The Ethics of Psychological Research. Pergamon Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Eugene C. Kennedy (ed.) (1975). Human Rights and Psychological Research: A Debate on Psychology and Ethics: Based on the Loyola Symposium on Psychology and Ethics, May 2, 1973. Crowell.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Jill Julius Matthews (ed.) (1994). Jane Gallop Seminar Papers: Proceedings of the Jane Gallop Seminar and Public Lecture 'the Teacher's Breasts' Held in 1993 by the Humanities Research Centre. The Centre, the Australian National University.
  15. Frank Moss, L. A. Lugiato & Wolfgang Schleich (eds.) (1990). Noise and Chaos in Nonlinear Dynamical Systems: Proceedings of the Nato Advanced Research Workshop on Noise and Chaos in Nonlinear Dynamical Systems, Institute for Scientific Interchange, Villa Gualino, Turin, Italy, March 7-11, 1989. [REVIEW] Cambridge University Press.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  30
    Michael Gibbons (ed.) (1994). The New Production of Knowledge: The Dynamics of Science and Research in Contemporary Societies. Sage Publications.
    As we approach the end of the twentieth century, the ways in which knowledge--scientific, social, and cultural--is produced are undergoing fundamental changes. In The New Production of Knowledge, a distinguished group of authors analyze these changes as marking the transition from established institutions, disciplines, practices, and policies to a new mode of knowledge production. Identifying such elements as reflexivity, transdisciplinarity, and heterogeneity within this new mode, the authors consider their impact and interplay with the role of knowledge in social relations. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   150 citations  
  17.  51
    Adil E. Shamoo (2009). Responsible Conduct of Research. Oxford University Press.
    Scientific research and ethics -- Ethical theory and decision making -- Data acquisition and management -- Mentoring and professional relationship -- Collaboration in research -- Authorship -- Publication and peer review -- Misconduct in research -- Intellectual property -- Conflicts of interest and scientific objectivity -- The use of animals in research -- The use of human subjects in research -- The use of vulnerable subjects in research -- Genetics, cloning, and stem cell (...) -- International research. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   39 citations  
  18.  34
    Harold Kincaid (1996). Philosophical Foundations of the Social Sciences: Analyzing Controversies in Social Research. Cambridge University Press.
    This book defends the prospects for a science of society. It argues that behind the diverse methods of the natural sciences lies a common core of scientific rationality that the social sciences can and sometimes do achieve. It also argues that good social science must be in part about large-scale social structures and processes and thus that methodological individualism is misguided. These theses are supported by a detailed discussion of actual social research, including (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   25 citations  
  19.  44
    Neema Sofaer, Penney Lewis & Hugh Davies, Care After Research: A Framework for NHS RECs. Health Research Authority.
    Care after research is for participants after they have finished the study. Often it is NHS-provided healthcare for the medical condition that the study addresses. Sometimes it includes the study intervention, whether funded and supplied by the study sponsor, NHS or other party. The NHS has the primary responsibility for care after research. However, researchers are responsible at least for explaining and justifying what will happen to participants once they have finished. RECs are responsible for considering the arrangements. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  20.  48
    Mahesh Ananth & Mike Scheessele (2012). Exempting All Minimal-Risk Research From IRB Review: Pruning or Poisoning the Regulatory Tree? IRB: Ethics & Human Research 34 (2):9-14.
    In a recent commentary, Kim and colleagues argued that minimal-risk research should be deregulated so that such studies do not require review by an institutional review board. They claim that regulation of minimal-risk studies provides no adequate counterbalancing good and instead leads to a costly human subjects oversight system. We argue that the counterbalancing good of regulating minimal-risk studies is that oversight exists to ensure that respect for persons and justice requirements are satisfied when they otherwise might not be.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  62
    Janet Borgerson (2005). Addressing the 'Global Basic Structure' in the Ethics of International Health Research Involving Human Subjects. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:235-249.
    The context of international health research involving human subjects, and this should appear obvious, is the human community. As such, basic questions of how human beings should be treated by other human beings, particularly in situations of unequal power – e.g., in the form of control, choice, or opportunity – lay at the foundations of related ethical discourse when ethics are discussed at all. I trace a narrative that follows upon a recent revision process of international guidelines for biomedical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  63
    Greg Bamford (2003). Research, Knowledge and Design. In Clare Newton, Sandra Kaj-O'Grady & Simon Wollan (eds.), Design + Research: Project Based Research in Architecture. Second International Conference of the Association of Australasian Schools of Architecture, Melbourne 28 – 30 September, 2003. Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia
    The discussion about relations between research and design has a number of strands, and presumably motivations. Putting aside the question whether or not design or “creative endeavour” should be counted as research, for reasons to do with institutional recognition or reward, the question remains how, if at all, is design research? This question is unlikely to have attracted much interest but for matters external to Architecture within the modern university. But Architecture as a discipline (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  18
    David R. Morrow, Robert E. Kopp & Michael Oppenheimer (2009). Toward Ethical Norms and Institutions for Climate Engineering Research. Environmental Research Letters 4.
    Climate engineering (CE), the intentional modification of the climate in order to reduce the effects of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, is sometimes touted as a potential response to climate change. Increasing interest in the topic has led to proposals for empirical tests of hypothesized CE techniques, which raise serious ethical concerns. We propose three ethical guidelines for CE researchers, derived from the ethics literature on research with human and animal subjects, applicable in the event that CE research progresses (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  1
    Sylvie Vandoolaeghe, Alessandra Blaizot, Danie Boudiguet, Valérie Bougault, Eduardo Dei Cas, Benoît Foligne, Anne Goffard, Hélène Lefranc, Bénédicte Oxombre, Thomas Trentesaux, Bernard Vandenbunder, Isabelle Wolowczuk, Laurence Delhaes & The “Ethic and Research” Working Group (2015). A Charter for Biomedical Research Ethics in a Progressive, Caring Society. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 10 (1):1-6.
    BackgroundGiven that advances in research continuously raise new ethical issues, a multidisciplinary working group of investigators involved in biomedical research has gathered to discuss and compare ethical viewpoints in their daily practice.MethodsThe working group has drafted a Charter for Ethics in Biomedical Research that encompasses all the steps in the research process, i.e. from the initial idea to analysis and publication of the results.ResultsBased on key principles for ethically responsible research, the Charter may serve as (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. David Koepsell, Willem-Paul Brinkman & Sylvia Pont (2014). Human Research Ethics Committees in Technical Universities. Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics 9 (3):67-73.
    Human research ethics has developed in both theory and practice mostly from experiences in medical research. Human participants, however, are used in a much broader range of research than ethics committees oversee, including both basic and applied research at technical universities. Although mandated in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia, non-medical research involving humans need not receive ethics review in much of Europe, Asia, Latin America, and Africa. Our survey of the top (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  8
    Jyoti Choudrie & Yogesh Kumar Dwivedi (2005). Investigating the Research Approaches for Examining Technology Adoption Issues. Journal of Research Practice 1 (1):Article - D1.
    Adoption of technology, a research topic within the Information Systems area, is usually studied at two levels: organizational level and user level. This paper examines the range of methods used for studying technology adoption issues at both these levels. The approaches were selected after conducting a review of 48 articles on technology adoption and usage, published in peer reviewed journals between 1985 and 2003. The journals reviewed include the MIS Quarterly, Information Systems Research, European Journal of Information Systems, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  8
    Lynn Froggett & Stephen Briggs (2012). Practice-Near and Practice-Distant Methods in Human Services Research. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M9.
    This article discusses practice-near research in human services, a cluster of methodologies that may include thick description, intensive reflexivity, and the study of emotional and relational processes. Such methods aim to get as near as possible to experiences at the relational interface between institutions and the practice field. Psychoanalytically informed approaches to research are particularly fruitful here. In this article these are discussed in relation to the reflective practice and critical reflection traditions which have been widely discussed within (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  7
    Stephen Dovers (2005). Clarifying the Imperative of Integration Research for Sustainable Environmental Management. Journal of Research Practice 1 (2):Article M2.
    This paper discusses why integration is important in doing research for developing policy and practice of sustainable environmental management. The imperative of integration includes environmental, social, economic, and other disciplinary considerations, as well as stakeholder interests. However, what is meant by integration is not always clear. While the imperative is being increasingly enunciated, the challenges it presents are difficult and indicate a long term pursuit. This paper clarifies the different dimensions of integration, as an important preliminary step toward advancing (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  7
    Jo Whitehouse-Hart (2012). Surrendering to the Dream: An Account of the Unconscious Dynamics of a Research Relationship. Journal of Research Practice 8 (2):Article - M5.
    Recent years have seen psychoanalysis move out of the clinical area into the arena of empirical social research. This article uses a case study from a psychoanalytically informed media research project to explore conceptual, ethical, and methodological implications in research design in the light of this shift. The ideas of unconscious communication between interviewer and interviewee, the role of the researcher's subjectivity, and the impact of unconscious defences on the generation and interpretation of data are explored. In (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  8
    Rick Szostak (2013). Research Skills for the Future: An Interdisciplinary Perspective. Journal of Research Practice 9 (1):Article V3.
    This article is a response to a Viewpoint & Discussion article published in this journal: Ulrich, W., & Dash, D. P. (2013). Research skills for the future: Summary and critique of a comparative study in eight countries. Journal of Research Practice, 9(1), Article V1.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  5
    Carey M. Noland (2012). Institutional Barriers to Research on Sensitive Topics: Case of Sex Communication Research Among University Students. Journal of Research Practice 8 (1):Article - M2.
    When conducting research on sensitive topics, it is challenging to use new methods of data collection given the apprehensions of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs). This is especially worrying because sensitive topics of research often require novel approaches. In this article a brief personal history of navigating the IRB process for conducting sex communication research is presented, along with data from a survey that tested the assumptions long held by many IRBs. Results support some of the assumptions IRBs (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  5
    D. P. Dash & Werner Ulrich (2012). Introducing New Editorial Roles and Measures: Making the Journal of Research Practice Relevant to Researchers. Journal of Research Practice 8 (1):Article - E1.
    Following a detailed review of the accomplishments and aspirations of the Journal of Research Practice, we have undertaken a restructuring of the editorial board, with inputs from people associated with this journal. In designing the new structure, we have taken into account the need for building the journal’s profile in the six focus areas recently clarified: (1) Research Applications, (2) Research Spaces, (3) Research Education, (4) Research Experiences, (5) Research Philosophy, and (6) Research (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  5
    Gautam Bhattacharyya (2008). Genesis of an Academic Research Program. Journal of Research Practice 4 (1):Article D1.
    As students progress towards their PhD degrees, they will become more independent and practitioner-like; for those moving into academia, it is often assumed the programs of their PhD mentors will serve as prototypes for their own successful research programs. However, the author's research program as an Assistant Professor led him in directions never considered as a graduate student. The author had to make significant decisions in choosing a primary audience, finding an overarching theme, defining the individual problems, and (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  7
    E. A. Largent, C. Grady, F. G. Miller & A. Wertheimer (2011). Money, Coercion, and Undue Inducement: Attitudes About Payments to Research Participants. IRB: Ethics & Human Research 34 (1):1-8.
    Using payment to recruit research subjects is a common practice, but it raises ethical concerns that coercion or undue inducement could potentially compromise participants’ informed consent. This is the first national study to explore the attitudes of IRB members and other human subjects protection professionals concerning whether payment of research participants constitutes coercion or undue influence, and if so, why. The majority of respondents expressed concern that payment of any amount might influence a participant’s decisions or behaviors regarding (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  6
    Dino Alfier (2011). Critical Practical Analogy: A Research Tool for Reflecting and Making. Journal of Research Practice 7 (1):Article P3.
    What contribution can visual art practice bring to interdisciplinary research? And how to give an account of practice-led research that acknowledges the need for interdisciplinary intelligibility? I consider these two questions by reflecting on the methodology--which I call "critical practical analogy" (CPA)--that I have developed while investigating the metaethical implications of French philosopher Simone Weil's notion of attention, during my practice-led PhD. In order to address the first question, I consider as a case study a research art (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  5
    Tiiu Poldma (2011). Transforming Interior Spaces: Enriching Subjective Experiences Through Design Research. Journal of Research Practice 6 (2):Article M13.
    This article explores tacit knowledge of lived experience and how this form of knowledge relates to design research. It investigates how interior designers interpret user lived experiences when creating designed environments. The article argues that user experience is the basis of a form of knowledge that is useful for designers. The theoretical framework proposed in the article examines the nature of user experience and how it can be utilized in the design process. The study of lived experiences is contextualized (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  6
    R. D. Pentz, R. D. Harvey, M. White, Z. L. Farmer, O. Dashevskaya, Z. Chen, C. Lewis, T. K. Owonikoko & F. R. Khuri (2011). Research Biopsies in Phase I Studies: Views and Perspectives of Participants and Investigators. IRB: Ethics & Human Research 34 (2):1-8.
    In many research studies, tumor biopsies are an unavoidable requirement for achieving key scientific aims. Yet some commentators view mandatory research biopsies as coercive and suggest they should be optional, or at least optional until further data are obtained regarding their scientific usefulness. Further complicating the ethical picture is the fact that some research biopsies offer a potential for clinical benefit to trial participants. We interviewed and surveyed a convenience sample of participants in phase I clinical trials (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  4
    Carey M. Noland (2006). Auto-Photography as Research Practice: Identity and Self-Esteem Research. Journal of Research Practice 2 (1):Article M1.
    This paper explores auto-photography as a form of research practice in the area of identity and self-esteem research. It allows researchers to capture and articulate the ways identity guides human action and thought. It involves the generation and examination of the static images that participants themselves believe best represent them. Auto-photography is an important tool for building bridges with marginalized groups in the research process, since it offers researchers a way to let participants speak for themselves. Furthermore, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  4
    Bogusia Temple (2006). Being Bilingual: Issues for Cross-Language Research. Journal of Research Practice 2 (1):Article M2.
    The current political debates in England highlight the role of language in citizenship, social exclusion, and discrimination. Similar debates can also be found around the world. Correspondingly, research addressing different language communities is burgeoning. Service providers and academics are increasingly employing bilingual community researchers or interpreters to carry out research. However, there is very little written about the effect of working with bilingual researchers. What it means to be bilingual is often essentialised and rarely problematised. Bilingual researchers are (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  5
    Rick Szostak (2007). How and Why to Teach Interdisciplinary Research Practice. Journal of Research Practice 3 (2):Article M17.
    This article addresses the interrelated questions of why it is important to teach students about the nature of interdisciplinarity and how this material might be best communicated to students. It is important to define for students what is meant by disciplines and interdisciplinarity. Having distinguished interdisciplinarity from the disciplinary approach, the advantages and disadvantages of each can be discussed. It is useful to discuss the history of both disciplines and interdisciplinarity. It is also useful to discuss the complex relationship between (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  4
    Lynn Butler-Kisber & Tiiu Poldma (2011). The Power of Visual Approaches in Qualitative Inquiry: The Use of Collage Making and Concept Mapping in Experiential Research. Journal of Research Practice 6 (2):Article M18.
    The burgeoning interest in arts-informed research and the increasing variety of visual possibilities as a result of new technologies have paved the way for researchers to explore and use visual forms of inquiry. This article investigates how collage making and concept mapping are useful visual approaches that can inform qualitative research. They are experiential ways of doing/knowing that help to get at tacit aspects of both understanding and process and to make these more explicit to the researcher and (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  4
    Niels Christian Nickelsen (2010). Rethinking Interventionist Research: Navigating Oppositional Networks in a Danish Hospital. Journal of Research Practice 5 (2):Article M4.
    This article reports on a researcher's experience of being invited to improve upon an organisational situation in a hospital in Denmark. Being engaged with different networks of participants in the organisational situation, the researcher found himself wrapped up in various agendas, with different sections of the staff trying to persuade him to support their own respective interests. The article theorises these persuasions as "seductions." Consequently, the task of the researcher involves selecting, prioritising, and working upon his connections with various networks, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  2
    Linda Neuhauser, Dawn Richardson, Sonja Mackenzie & Meredith Minkler (2007). Advancing Transdisciplinary and Translational Research Practice: Issues and Models of Doctoral Education in Public Health. Journal of Research Practice 3 (2):Article M19.
    Finding solutions to complex health problems, such as obesity, violence, and climate change, will require radical changes in cross-disciplinary education, research, and practice. The fundamental determinants of health include many interrelated factors such as poverty, culture, education, environment, and government policies. However, traditional public health training has tended to focus more narrowly on diseases and risk factors, and has not adequately leveraged the rich contributions of sociology, anthropology, economics, geography, communication, political science, and other disciplines. Further, students are often (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  3
    Seymour Roworth-Stokes (2013). The Business of Research in Art and Design: Parallels Between Research Centres and Small Businesses. Journal of Research Practice 9 (1):Article M3.
    This article provides a cross-case analysis of four art and design research centres operating within UK universities. Findings from autobiographical and semi-structured interviews with researchers, research managers, and research leaders indicate that they encounter similar issues in trying to establish internal legitimacy within the university alongside the need to gain external support and recognition. In dealing with these challenges, art and design research centres tend to pass through four broadly identifiable phases: (i) Origination (utilising credentials and (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  3
    Maarit Mäkelä, Nithikul Nimkulrat, D. P. Dash & Francois-X. Nsenga (2011). On Reflecting and Making in Artistic Research. Journal of Research Practice 7 (1):Article E1.
    Following the integration of artistic disciplines within the university, artists have been challenged to review their practice in academic terms. This has become a vigorous epicentre of debates concerning the nature of research in the artistic disciplines. The special issue "On Reflecting and Making in Artistic Research Practice" captures some of this debate. This editorial article presents a broad-brush outline of the debates raging in the artistic disciplines and presents three discernible trends in those debates. The trends highlight (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  3
    Lorrae van Kerkhoff (2005). Strategic Integration: The Practical Politics of Integrated Research in Context. Journal of Research Practice 1 (2):Article - M5.
    Designing an integrative research program requires that research leaders negotiate a balance between the scientific interest of research and the practical interests of non-scientific partners. This paper examines the ways integrated research is formally categorised, and analyses the tangible expressions of the practical politics involved in reconciling scientific and practical interests. Drawing on a comparative study of two Australian Cooperative Research Centres, I argue that categories used by the research leaders to describe the (...) programs embody three different strategies for structuring the relationships between researchers and their partners. These include matching research program categories to partners' implementation program categories, reproducing existing integrative partnership models, and filling gaps in understanding with new technical approaches. These strategies offer different advantages and disadvantages. The cases suggest that the integrative approach favoured by each Centre depended on issues such as the geographic scope of policy arenas, sources of scientific credibility, and the political risks facing partners. The practical politics of research organisation offers a new lens for understanding both the practice and theory of integrated research. (shrink)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  2
    Bodil Stilling Blichfeldt & Jesper Rank Andersen (2006). Creating a Wider Audience for Action Research: Learning From Case-Study Research. Journal of Research Practice 2 (1):Article D2.
    Drawing upon the literature on action research and case-study research, this paper discusses similarities and differences between these two forms of research practice. The paper also highlights some of the criticisms and challenges action researchers face. It suggests ways in which action researchers may enhance the discussability of action research by: (a) increasing the transparency of their research processes, (b) declaring the intellectual frameworks brought into action research projects, (c) discussing transferability of findings, and (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  2
    Thomas Wolfgang Thurner & Liliana Proskuryakova (2013). Collaborative Research in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy: Evidence From 5 Years of US-Russian Research Cooperation. Journal of Research Practice 9 (1):Article M4.
    We reviewed the output of research and innovation cooperation between Russia and the US, including publications and patents, in the four prospective areas of energy efficiency and renewable energy during 2007-2011. Joint US-Russia research groups appear to focus primarily on hydrogen energy (fuel cells), followed by solar photovoltaics. The upcoming areas of smart grid and biofuels were left out entirely both from research and innovation collaboration. Russian patents in green energy technologies registered in the US are very (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  2
    Tarja Tiainen & Emma-Reetta Koivunen (2006). Exploring Forms of Triangulation to Facilitate Collaborative Research Practice: Reflections From a Multidisciplinary Research Group. Journal of Research Practice 2 (2):Article M2.
    This article contains critical reflections of a multidisciplinary research group studying the human and technological dynamics around some newly offered electronic services in a specific rural area of Finland. For their research, the group adopted ethnography. On facing the challenges of doing ethnographic research in a multidisciplinary setting, the group evolved its own breed of research practice based on multiple forms of triangulation. This implied the use of multiple data sources, methods, theories, and researchers, in different (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  2
    Heather Grenville & Darlene Ciuffetelli Parker (2013). From Research Assistant to Researcher: Being Wakeful in a Mentorship Journey About Methodology, Poverty, and Deficit Thinking. Journal of Research Practice 9 (2):Article M7 (proof).
    This article explores how insights and new knowledge were incorporated about narrative inquiry methodology, poverty, and deficit ways of thinking through a journey of mentorship. The experiences of a graduate student, as she journeys through the roles of a research assistant and graduate researcher, all the while being part of a positive mentorship experience, are relayed. The article describes the journey of an evolving researcher who becomes wakeful through the narrative inquiry methodology while engaged as a research assistant (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000