Search results for 'Research legislation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jan Deckers (2005). Why Current Uk Legislation on Embryo Research is Immoral. How the Argument From Lack of Qualities and the Argument From Potentiality Have Been Applied and Why They Should Be Rejected. Bioethics 19 (3):251–271.score: 120.0
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  2. S. Aksoy (2005). Making Regulations and Drawing Up Legislation in Islamic Countries Under Conditions of Uncertainty, with Special Reference to Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):399-403.score: 120.0
  3. Carlo Biagioli (forthcoming). Law Making Environment: Model Based System for the Formulation, Research and Diagnosis of Legislation. Artificial Intelligence and Law.score: 120.0
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  4. L. Trevena (2006). Impact of Privacy Legislation on the Number and Characteristics of People Who Are Recruited for Research: A Randomised Controlled Trial. Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (8):473-477.score: 120.0
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  5. G. Bravo (2003). Knowledge of the Legislation Governing Proxy Consent to Treatment and Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (1):44-50.score: 120.0
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  6. L. Gillam & K. Weedon (2005). Medical Research and Involuntary Mental Health Patients: Implications of Proposed Changes to Legislation in Victoria. Monash Bioethics Review 24 (4).score: 120.0
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  7. R. V. Segsworth (1989). Freedom of Information Legislation and Utilization of Evaluation Research: Exploring Some Relationships. Knowledge in Society 2 (4):49-61.score: 120.0
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  8. Anthony Vernillo (2008). Pragmatism as a Complementary Approach to Legislation: Closing Regulatory Gaps in Human Subject Research. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (11):15 – 17.score: 120.0
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  9. Christiane Woopen (1998). MacKellar, Calum (Ed.): Reproductive Medicine and Embryological Research. A European Handbook of Bioethical Legislation. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 1 (1):86-86.score: 120.0
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  10. Arja Halkoaho, Mari Matveinen, Ville Leinonen, Kirsi Luoto & Tapani Keränen (2013). Education of Research Ethics for Clinical Investigators with Moodle Tool. BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):53.score: 108.0
    In clinical research scientific, legal as well as ethical aspects are important. It is well known that clinical investigators at university hospitals have to undertake their PhD-studies alongside their daily work and reconciling work and study can be challenging. The aim of this project was to create a web based course in clinical research bioethics (5 credits) and to examine whether the method is suitable for teaching bioethics. The course comprised of six modules: an initial examination (to assess (...)
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  11. Aurora Plomer (2005). The Law and Ethics of Medical Research: International Bioethics and Human Rights. Cavendish.score: 96.0
    This book examines the controversies surrounding biomedical research in the twenty-first century from a human rights perspective, analyzing the evolution and ...
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  12. Anna C. Mastroianni, Ruth R. Faden & Daniel D. Federman (eds.) (1994). Women and Health Research: Ethical and Legal Issues of Including Women in Clinical Studies. National Academy Press.score: 96.0
    Executive Summary There is a general perception that biomedical research has not given the same attention to the health problems of women that it has given ...
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  13. Oonagh Corrigan (ed.) (2009). The Limits of Consent: A Socio-Ethical Approach to Human Subject Research in Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    Since its inception as an international requirement to protect patients and healthy volunteers taking part in medical research, informed consent has become the primary consideration in research ethics. Despite the ubiquity of consent, however, scholars have begun to question its adequacy for contemporary biomedical research. This book explores this issue, reviewing the application of consent to genetic research, clinical trials, and research involving vulnerable populations. For example, in genetic research, information obtained from an autonomous (...)
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  14. Ritva Halila (2007). Assessing the Ethics of Medical Research in Emergency Settings: How Do International Regulations Work in Practice? Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (3):305-313.score: 84.0
    Different ethical principles conflict in research conducted in emergency research. Clinical care and its development should be based on research. Patients in critical clinical condition are in the greatest need of better medicines. The critical condition of the patient and the absence of a patient representative at the critical time period make it difficult and sometimes impossible to request an informed consent before the beginning of the trial. In an emergency, care decisions must be made in a (...)
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  15. Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.) (2008). The Oxford Textbook of Clinical Research Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    Comprehensive in scope and research, this book will be a crucial resource for researchers in the medical sciences, as well as teachers and students alike.
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  16. Christian Lenk, Nils Hoppe, Katharian Beier & Claudia Wiesemann (eds.) (2011). Human Tissue Research. A European Perspective on the Ethical and Legal Challenges. Oxford University Press.score: 84.0
    It will be of value to medics and social scientists, human tissue researchers, and policy makers who have an interest in ethical and legal issues of human tissue research.
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  17. Dr Ruth L. Fischbach & Diane C. Gilbert (1995). The Ombudsman for Research Practice. Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (4):389-402.score: 84.0
    We propose that institutions consider establishing a position of “Ombudsman for Research Practice”. This person would assume several roles: as asounding board to those needing confidential consultation about research issues — basic, applied or clinical; as afacilitator for those wishing to pursue a formal grievance process; and as aneducator to distribute guidelines and standards, to raise the consciousness regarding sloppy or irregular practices in order to prevent misconduct and to promote the responsible conduct of research. While there (...)
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  18. Carla Truyers, Eliane Kellen, Marc Arbyn, Leen Trommelmans, Herman Nys, Karen Hensen, Bert Aertgeerts, Stefaan Bartholomeeusen, Mats Hansson & Frank Buntinx (2010). The Use of Human Tissue in Epidemiological Research; Ethical and Legal Considerations in Two Biobanks in Belgium. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):169-175.score: 84.0
    This paper discusses the legal implications of setting up two new biobanks in Belgium. The first is hospital-based and will archive tissue from patients with haematologic cancer, whereas the second is linked to a general practice based morbidity registry and will involve storage of blood samples. To date, Belgium has no specific legislation that regulates storage of human tissue and related databases. Several issues concerning the protection of individuals with regard to the processing of personal medical data are discussed (...)
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  19. García San José & I. Daniel (2010). International Bio Law: An International Overview of Developments in Human Embryo Research and Experimentation. Ediciones Laborum.score: 78.0
     
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  20. Hana Konečná, Tonko Mardešić, Taťána Rumpíková & Tomáš Kučera (2012). Qualitative Research in Reproductive Medicine: From Description to Action. Human Affairs 22 (4):462-474.score: 78.0
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  21. Neema Sofaer, Penney Lewis & Hugh Davies, Care After Research: A Framework for NHS RECs. Health Research Authority.score: 72.0
    Care after research is for participants after they have finished the study. Often it is NHS-provided healthcare for the medical condition that the study addresses. Sometimes it includes the study intervention, whether funded and supplied by the study sponsor, NHS or other party. The NHS has the primary responsibility for care after research. However, researchers are responsible at least for explaining and justifying what will happen to participants once they have finished. RECs are responsible for considering the arrangements. (...)
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  22. M. Strätling, V. E. Scharf & P. Schmucker (2004). Mental Competence and Surrogate Decision-Making Towards the End of Life. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 7 (2):209-215.score: 72.0
    German legislation demands that decisions about the treatment of mentally incompetent patients require an ‘informed consent’. If this was not given by the patient him-/herself before he/she became incompetent, it has to be sought by the physician from a guardian, who has to be formally legitimized before. Additionally this surrogate has to seek the permission of a Court of Guardianship (Vormundschaftsgericht), if he/she intends to consent to interventions, which pose significant risks to the health or the life of the (...)
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  23. David Lewis (2008). Ten Years of Public Interest Disclosure Legislation in the UK: Are Whistleblowers Adequately Protected? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):497 - 507.score: 66.0
    Purpose The purpose of this article is to assess the operation of the UK’s Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 (PIDA 1998) during its first 10 years and to consider its implications for the whistleblowing process. Method The article sets the legislation into context by discussing the common law background. It then gives detailed consideration to the statutory provisions and how they have been interpreted by the courts and tribunals. Results In assessing the impact of the legislation’s approach to (...)
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  24. Dirk van Rooy & Jacques Bus (2010). Trust and Privacy in the Future Internet—a Research Perspective. Identity in the Information Society 3 (2):397-404.score: 66.0
    With the proliferation of networked electronic communication came daunting capabilities to collect, process, combine and store data, resulting in hitherto unseen transformational pressure on the concepts of trust, security and privacy as we know them. The Future Internet will bring about a world where real life will integrate physical and digital life. Technology development for data linking and mining, together with unseen data collection, will lead to unwarranted access to personal data, and hence, privacy intrusion. Trust and identity lie at (...)
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  25. Keymanthri Moodley & Landon Myer (2007). Health Research Ethics Committees in South Africa 12 Years Into Democracy. BMC Medical Ethics 8 (1):1-8.score: 66.0
    Background Despite the growth of biomedical research in South Africa, there are few insights into the operation of Research Ethics Committees (RECs) in this setting. We investigated the composition, operations and training needs of health RECs in South Africa against the backdrop of national and international guidelines. Methods The 12 major health RECs in South Africa were surveyed using semi-structured questionnaires that investigated the composition and functions of each REC as well as the operational issues facing committees. Results (...)
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  26. Malcolm G. Booth (2007). Informed Consent in Emergency Research: A Contradiction in Terms. Science and Engineering Ethics 13 (3):351-359.score: 66.0
    Improving the treatment of life threatening emergency illness or disease requires that new or novel therapies be assessed in clinical trials. As most subjects for these trials will be incapacitated there is some controversy about they might best protected whilst still allowing research to continue. Recent European and UK clinical trials legislation, which has effectively stopped research into emergency conditions, is discussed. Possible changes to these regulations are proposed.
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  27. Susan Dodds & Rachel A. Ankeny (2006). Regulation of hESC Research in Australia: Promises and Pitfalls for Deliberative Democratic Approaches. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 3 (1-2):95-107.score: 66.0
    This paper considers the legislative debates in Australia that led to the passage of the Research Involving Human Embryos Act (Cth 2002) and the Prohibition of Human Cloning Act (Cth 2002). In the first part of the paper, we discuss the debate surrounding the legislation with particular emphasis on the ways in which demands for public consultation, public debate and the education of Australians about the potential ethical and scientific impact of human embryonic stem cells (hESC) research (...)
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  28. Chesmal Siriwardhana, Anushka Adikari, Kaushalya Jayaweera & Athula Sumathipala (2013). Ethical Challenges in Mental Health Research Among Internally Displaced People: Ethical Theory and Research Implementation. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):13-.score: 66.0
    Millions of people undergo displacement in the world. Internally displaced people (IDP) are especially vulnerable as they are not protected by special legislation in contrast to other migrants. Research conducted among IDPs must be correspondingly sensitive in dealing with ethical issues that may arise. Muslim IDPs in Puttalam district in the North-Western province of Sri Lanka were initially displaced from Northern Sri Lanka due to the conflict in 1991. In the backdrop of a study exploring the prevalence of (...)
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  29. Barry Lyons (2012). Solidarity, Children and Research. Bioethics 26 (7):369-375.score: 66.0
    While research on children is supported by many professional guidelines, international declarations and domestic legislation, when it is undertaken on children with no possibility of direct benefit it rests on shaky moral foundations. A number of authors have suggested that research enrolment is in the child's best interests, or that they have a moral duty or societal obligation to participate. However, these arguments are unpersuasive. Rather, I will propose in this paper that research participation by children (...)
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  30. Olena Grebeniuk (2013). Main Challenges and Prospects of Improving Ukrainian Legislation on Criminal Liability for Crimes Related to Drug Testing in the Context of European Integration. Jurisprudence 20 (3):1249-1270.score: 66.0
    The proposed article provides an overview of European and North American states’ legislation, which regulates the procedure for pre-clinical research, clinical trials and state registration of medicinal products, as well as responsibility for its violation, analysis of the problems and prospects of adaptation of the national legislation to European legal space, particularly in the field of criminal and legal regulation of relations in the sphere of pre-clinical trials, clinical trials and state registration of medicine. The emphasis is (...)
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  31. Susan L. Crockin (2010). Legal Conceptions: The Evolving Law and Policy of Assisted Reproductive Technologies. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 60.0
    Embryo litigation -- Access to ART treatment : insurance and discrimination -- General professional liability litigation -- Paternity and donor insemination -- Maternity and egg donation -- Traditional and gestational surrogacy arrangements -- Posthumous reproduction : access and parentage -- Same-sex parentage and ART -- Genetics (PGD) and ART -- ART-related embryonic stem cell legal developments -- ART-related adoption litigation -- ART-related fetal litigation and abortion-related litigation.
     
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  32. Stephen Humphreys (2013). Research Ethics Committees: The Ineligibles. Research Ethics:1747016113489944.score: 60.0
    Some anomalies in the legislation governing National Research Ethics Service Research Ethics Committee (REC) member categories are discussed. It is suggested that not only may some members be in the wrong category, but that the legislation identifies individuals who are simply ineligible for any form of REC membership.
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  33. N. Sofaer & D. Strech (2011). Reasons Why Post-Trial Access to Trial Drugs Should, or Need Not Be Ensured to Research Participants: A Systematic Review. Public Health Ethics 4 (2):160-184.score: 54.0
    Background : researchers and sponsors increasingly confront the issue of whether participants in a clinical trial should have post-trial access (PTA) to the trial drug. Legislation and guidelines are inconsistent, ambiguous or silent about many aspects of PTA. Recent research highlights the potential importance of systematic reviews (SRs) of reason-based literatures in informing decision-making in medicine, medical research and health policy. Purpose: to systematically review reasons why drug trial participants should, or need not be ensured PTA to (...)
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  34. Czesław Radzikowski (2006). Protection of Animal Research Subjects. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (1):103-110.score: 54.0
    The use of experimental animals, mostly rodents, in biomedical research and especially in oncology and immunology should be acknowledged with respect, recognizing the contribution of animal experimentation in the fascinating scientific progress in these disciplines of research. It is an obligation of the investigator to justify the scientific and ethical aspects of each study requiring the use of animals. The international guiding principles for using animals in biomedical research are well defined and have been distributed worldwide by (...)
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  35. Colin T. Whittemore (1995). Response to the Environmental and Welfare Imperatives by U.K. Livestock Production Industries and Research Services. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 8 (1):65-84.score: 54.0
    Production methods for food from U.K. livestock industries (milk, dairy products, meat, eggs, fibre) are undergoing substantial change as a result of the need to respond to environmental and animal welfare awareness of purchasing customers, and to espouse the principles of environmental protection. There appears to be a strong will on the part of livestock farmers to satisfy the environmental imperative, led by the need to maintain market share and by existing and impending legislation. There has been support forthcoming (...)
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  36. Borys Alberto Cornejo Moreno & Gress Marissell Gómez Arteaga (2012). Violation of Ethical Principles in Clinical Research. Influences and Possible Solutions for Latin America. BMC Medical Ethics 13 (1):35.score: 54.0
    Background Even though we are now well into the 21st century and notwithstanding all the abuse to individuals involved in clinical studies that has been documented throughout History, fundamental ethical principles continue to be violated in one way or another. Discussion Here are some of the main factors that contribute to the abuse of subjects participating in clinical trials: paternalism, improper use of informed consent, lack of strict ethical supervision, pressure exerted by health institutions to increase the production of scientific (...)
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  37. Sibylle Rolf (2010). Human Embryos and Human Dignity: Differing Presuppositions in Human Embryo Research in Germany and Great Britain. Heythrop Journal 53 (5):742-754.score: 54.0
    This article notes differences in legislation in Germany and Great Britain regarding human embryo research and looks for an explanation in their divergent intellectual traditions. Whereas the German Stem Cell Act invokes an anthropological concept of human dignity to ground its ban on using embryos for research, there is no definition of what it means to be human in either the British Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act or in the advisory Warnock-Report. After studying the differences and providing (...)
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  38. Sara Ashencaen Crabtree (2012). Research Ethics and the Moral Enterprise of Ethnography: Conjunctions and Contradictions. Ethics and Social Welfare (4):1-20.score: 54.0
    This paper explores the perceptions and experiences of four doctoral researchers to examine how research ethics committee (REC) processes have shaped and influenced specific health-based ethnographic studies. This paper considers how a universal tightening of ethical REC scrutiny at university level, as well as those governing the health and social care sector in the United Kingdom, impacts upon social research involving the inclusion of participants from certain groups. Increased restrictions in ethics scrutiny is justified as protecting vulnerable people (...)
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  39. B. E. Gibson, E. Stasiulis, S. Gutfreund, M. McDonald & L. Dade (2011). Assessment of Children's Capacity to Consent for Research: A Descriptive Qualitative Study of Researchers' Practices. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (8):504-509.score: 54.0
    Background In Canadian jurisdictions without specific legislation pertaining to research consent, the onus is placed on researchers to determine whether a child is capable of independently consenting to participate in a research study. Little, however, is known about how child health researchers are approaching consent and capacity assessment in practice. The aim of this study was to explore and describe researchers' current practices. Methods The study used a qualitative descriptive design consisting of 14 face-to-face interviews with child (...)
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  40. I. H. Kerridge, C. F. C. Jordens, R. Benson, R. Clifford, R. A. Ankeny, D. Keown, B. Tobin, S. Bhattacharyya, A. Sachedina, L. S. Lehmann & B. Edgar (2010). Religious Perspectives on Embryo Donation and Research. Clinical Ethics 5 (1):35-45.score: 54.0
    The success of assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) worldwide has led to an accumulation of frozen embryos that are surplus to the reproductive needs of those for whom they were created. In these situations, couples must decide whether to discard them or donate them for scientific research or for use by other infertile couples. While legislation and regulation may limit the decisions that couples make, their decisions are often shaped by their religious beliefs. Unfortunately, health professionals, scientists and policy-makers (...)
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  41. Isabella Paoletti (2014). Ethics and the Social Dimension of Research Activities. Human Studies 37 (2):257-277.score: 54.0
    This study identifies some of the ethical issues that arise in the everyday practice of researching in collecting interactional data. A form of conceptualizing ethics in research is proposed as awareness of the social dimension of research practices and their transformative nature. The collection of ethnographic data—including interviewing, observing, audiovisual recording, and other methods—is achieved by means of social interactions that necessarily imply issues of face, relevance, appropriateness, politeness, and identity, to name a few. Research activities have (...)
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  42. J. V. McHale (2006). 'Appropriate Consent' and the Use of Human Material for Research Purposes: The Competent Adult. Clinical Ethics 1 (4):195-199.score: 54.0
    The Human Tissue Act 2004 presents a radical change to the legal regulation of the use of human material in England and Wales. The Act presents a broad regulatory framework but much in the practical operation of the legislation will depend upon regulations to be enacted and a new Code of Practice. This article examines 'appropriate consent' for the use of human tissue for research purposes in the context of the living competent adult. It examines the provision of (...)
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  43. Lainie Friedman Ross (2006). Children in Medical Research: Access Versus Protection. OUP Oxford.score: 54.0
    Lainie Ross presents a rigorous critical investigation of the development of policy governing the involvement of children in medical research. She examines the shift in focus from protection of medical research subjects, enshrined in post-World War II legislation, to the current era in which access is assuming greater precedence. Infamous studies such as Willowbrook (where mentally retarded children were infected with hepatitis) are evidence that before the policy shift protection was not always adequate, even for the most (...)
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  44. Elaine Gibson, Kevin Brazil, Michael D. Coughlin, Claudia Emerson, Francois Fournier, Lisa Schwartz, Karen V. Szala-Meneok, Karen M. Weisbaum & Donald J. Willison (2008). Who's Minding the Shop? The Role of Canadian Research Ethics Boards in the Creation and Uses of Registries and Biobanks. BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):17-.score: 54.0
    BackgroundThe amount of research utilizing health information has increased dramatically over the last ten years. Many institutions have extensive biobank holdings collected over a number of years for clinical and teaching purposes, but are uncertain as to the proper circumstances in which to permit research uses of these samples. Research Ethics Boards (REBs) in Canada and elsewhere in the world are grappling with these issues, but lack clear guidance regarding their role in the creation of and access (...)
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  45. F. Anderson, A. Glasier, J. Ross & D. T. Baird (1994). Attitudes of Women to Fetal Tissue Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (1):36-40.score: 54.0
    The use of human fetal tissue for scientific research has enormous potential but is subject to government legislation. In the United Kingdom the Polkinghorne Committee's guidelines were accepted by the Department of Health in 1990. These guidelines set out to protect women undergoing termination of pregnancy from exploitation but in so doing may significantly restrict potential research. Although the committee took evidence from a wide variety of experts they did not seek the views of the general public. (...)
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  46. Jan Lecouturier, Helen Rodgers, Gary A. Ford, Tim Rapley, Lynne Stobbart, Stephen J. Louw & Madeleine J. Murtagh (2008). Clinical Research Without Consent in Adults in the Emergency Setting: A Review of Patient and Public Views. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 9 (1):9.score: 54.0
    In emergency research, obtaining informed consent can be problematic. Research to develop and improve treatments for patients admitted to hospital with life-threatening and debilitating conditions is much needed yet the issue of research without consent (RWC) raises concerns about unethical practices and the loss of individual autonomy. Consistent with the policy and practice turn towards greater patient and public involvement in health care decisions, in the US, Canada and EU, guidelines and legislation implemented to protect patients (...)
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  47. Matthew Weed (2004). Ethics, Regulation, and Biomedical Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (4):361-368.score: 54.0
    : Controversy has surrounded the institutions that facilitate discussion and regulation of American biomedical research for years. Recent challenges to the legitimacy of the President's Council on Bioethics have been focused on stem cell research. These arguments represent an opportunity to reconsider the legislation under which stem cell research is regulated, as well as to consider preexisting bodies like the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee and National Bioethics Advisory Commission. This paper proposes a Federal Life Sciences Policy (...)
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  48. H. R. Fisher, C. McKevitt & A. Boaz (2011). Why Do Parents Enrol Their Children in Research: A Narrative Synthesis. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (9):544-551.score: 54.0
    Objective Recent legislation mandating the inclusion of children in clinical trials has resulted in an increase in the number of children participating in research. We reviewed the literature regarding the reasons parents chose to accept or decline an invitation to enrol their children in clinical research. Methods We searched for qualitative studies, written in the English language that considered the experiences of parents who had been invited to enrol their children in research. SCOPUS and Web of (...)
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  49. Michael C. Morris (2003). Issues Associated with Research on Sheep Parasite Control in New Zealand – a Descriptive Ethic. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 16 (2):187-207.score: 54.0
    In common with much of theEnglish-speaking world, New Zealandersgenerally oppose the use of animalexperimentation where there is no demonstrableand immediate benefit for human, animal, orenvironmental health. Intrusive experiments onsheep internal and external parasites publishedbetween 1996 and 2000 are reviewed, anddiscussed in relation to these publicsensibilities. A total of 16 publishedexperiments on sheep parasites involvedsurgical manipulations or other intrusiveprocedures. Some of these experiments had noshort-term application, or the only applicationwas in increasing animal production. Otherscould have been modified at some extra expenseso (...)
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  50. Carlos Romeo-Casabona (2004). Legal Perspectives in Novel Psychiatric Treatment and Related Research. Poiesis and Praxis 2 (4):315-328.score: 54.0
    The new generation of psychopharmacological products have proved their efficacy. Some neuro-degenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, could be treated by means of the gene therapy. Although the aetiology of such diseases is still not completely known, it has been proven that the patients lack some substances that could be produced by means of the transfer of in vivo or ex vivo genes that codify them in the proper places of the brain. Furthermore, it is announced that the (...)
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