Search results for 'Respect for persons' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Aasim I. Padela, Aisha Y. Malik, Farr Curlin & Raymond De Vries (2014). [Re]Considering Respect for Persons in a Globalizing World. Developing World Bioethics 14 (2).score: 720.0
    Contemporary clinical ethics was founded on principlism, and the four principles: respect for autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence and justice, remain dominant in medical ethics discourse and practice. These principles are held to be expansive enough to provide the basis for the ethical practice of medicine across cultures. Although principlism remains subject to critique and revision, the four-principle model continues to be taught and applied across the world. As the practice of medicine globalizes, it remains critical to examine the extent to (...)
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  2. Roger Fjellstrom (2005). Respect for Persons, Respect for Integrity. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (2):231-242.score: 672.0
    Even though respect for integrity is hailed in several authoritative legal and ethical documents, and is typically presented as a complement to respect for autonomy, it is largely neglected in many leading works in ethics. Is such neglect warranted, or does it express a prejudice? This article argues that the latter is the case, and that this is due to misplaced conceptual concerns. It offers some proposals as regards the conceptualization of integrity in social ethics in general and (...)
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  3. R. S. Downie (1969/1970). Respect for Persons. New York,Schocken Books.score: 630.0
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  4. Simon Woods (2005). Respect for Persons, Autonomy and Palliative Care. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (2):243-253.score: 630.0
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  5. Owen Ware (2014). Forgiveness and Respect for Persons. American Philosophical Quarterly 51 (3).score: 612.0
    The concept of respect for persons is often rejected as a basis for understanding forgiveness. As many have argued, to hold your offender responsible for her actions is to respect her as a person; but this kind of respect is more likely to sustain, rather than dissolve, your resentment toward her (Garrard & McNaughton 2003; 2011; Allais 2008). I seek to defend an alternative view in this paper. To forgive, on my account, involves ceasing to identify (...)
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  6. Robin S. Dillon (2010). Respect for Persons, Identity, and Information Technology. Ethics and Information Technology 12 (1):17-28.score: 558.0
    There is surprisingly little attention in Information Technology ethics to respect for persons, either as an ethical issue or as a core value of IT ethics or as a conceptual tool for discussing ethical issues of IT. In this, IT ethics is very different from another field of applied ethics, bioethics, where respect is a core value and conceptual tool. This paper argues that there is value in thinking about ethical issues related to information technologies, especially, though (...)
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  7. Denis G. Arnold & Norman E. Bowie (2003). Sweatshops and Respect for Persons. Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (2):221-242.score: 540.0
    This article applies the Kantian doctrine of respect for persons to the problem of sweatshops. We argue that multinational enterprises are properly regarded as responsible for the practices of their subcontractors and suppliers. We then argue that multinational enterprises have the following duties in their offshore manufacturing facilities: to ensure that local labor laws are followed; to refrain from coercion; to meet minimum safety standards; and to provide a living wage for employees. Finally, we consider and reply to (...)
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  8. Thaddeus Metz (2001). Respect for Persons and Perfectionist Politics. Philosophy and Public Affairs 30 (4):417–442.score: 540.0
    Can a state seek to promote a thick conception of the good (such as fostering a kind of meaning or excellence in people's lives) without treating its citizens disrespectfully? The predominant answer among friends of the principle of respect for persons is "no." The most powerful Kantian objection to non-liberalism or perfectionism is the claim that citizens who do not share the state's conception of the good would be wronged in that the state would treat a certain way (...)
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  9. Thaddeus Metz (2008). Respect for Persons Permits Prioritizing Treatment for Hiv/Aids. Developing World Bioethics 8 (2):89-103.score: 540.0
    I defend a certain claim about rationing in the context of HIV/AIDS, namely, the 'priority thesis' that the state of a developing country with a high rate of HIV should provide highly active anti-retroviral treatment (HAART) to those who would die without it, even if doing so would require not treating most other life-threatening diseases. More specifically, I defend the priority thesis in a negative way, by refuting two influential and important arguments against it inspired by the Kantian principle of (...)
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  10. Norman E. Bowie (2003). Sweatshops and Respect for Persons. Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (2):221-242.score: 540.0
    This article applies the Kantian doctrine of respect for persons to the problem of sweatshops. We argue that multinational enterprises are properly regarded as responsible for the practices of their subcontractors and suppliers. We then argue that multinationalenterprises have the following duties in their off-shore manufacturing facilities: to ensure that local labor laws are followed; to refrain from coercion; to meet minimum safety standards; and to provide a living wage for employees. Finally, we consider and reply to the (...)
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  11. Massimo Reichlin (2002). The Sanctity / Quality of Life and the Ethics of Respect for Persons. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):37-54.score: 540.0
    It is often argued that scientific developments in the area of biomedicine call for new ethical paradigms. Given the inadequacies of the traditional “sanctity-of-life ethics” (SLE), many have argued for a quality-of-life ethics (QLE), based on a non-speciesistic theory ofthe value of life. In this paper, I claim that QLE cannot account for the normativity of moral judgments, which can be explained only within the context of a theory of practical rationality: the peculiarity of moral normativity calls for an ethics (...)
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  12. F. A. Miller, R. Z. Hayeems, L. Li & J. P. Bytautas (2012). What Does 'Respect for Persons' Require? Attitudes and Reported Practices of Genetics Researchers in Informing Research Participants About Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (1):48-52.score: 540.0
    Background It has been suggested that researchers are obliged to offer summary findings to research participants to demonstrate respect for persons, and that this may increase public trust in, and awareness of, the research enterprise. Yet little research explores researchers' attitudes and practices regarding the range of initiatives that might serve these ends. Methods Results of an international survey of 785 eligible authors of genetics research studies in autism or cystic fibrosis are reported. Results Of 343 researchers who (...)
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  13. Zachary Hoskins (2011). ''Deterrent Punishment and Respect for Persons''. Ohio State Journal of Criminal Law 8 (2):369-384.score: 537.0
    This article defends deterrence as an aim of punishment. Specifically, I contend that a system of punishment aimed at deterrence (with constraints to prohibit punishing the innocent or excessively punishing the guilty) is consistent with the liberal principle of respect for offenders as autonomous moral persons. I consider three versions of the objection that deterrent punishment fails to respect offenders. The first version, raised by Jeffrie Murphy and others, charges that deterrent punishment uses offenders as mere means (...)
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  14. Y. Michael Barilan & Moshe Weintraub (2001). Persuasion as Respect for Persons: An Alternative View of Autonomy and of the Limits of Discourse. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):13 – 34.score: 531.0
    The article calls for a departure from the common concept of autonomy in two significant ways: it argues for the supremacy of semantic understanding over procedure, and claims that clinicians are morally obliged to make a strong effort to persuade patients to accept medical advice. We interpret the value of autonomy as derived from the right persons have to respect, as agents who can argue, persuade and be persuaded in matters of utmost personal significance such as decisions about (...)
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  15. Stephen Kershnar (2004). Respect for Persons and the Harsh Punishment of Criminals. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 18 (1):103-121.score: 503.0
    In this paper, I explore whether harsh treatment fails to respect the criminal as a person. I focus on the most extreme treatment because if such treatment can satisfy the duty to respect a criminal as a person then less extreme cases (e.g., incarceration, fines, shaming practices) can also do so. I begin by filling out the notion of a duty to respect a person. Here I set out an account of autonomy and then show that it (...)
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  16. Gerald Gaus, Respect for Persons and the Evolution of Morality.score: 501.0
    Let me begin with a stylized contrast between two ways of thinking about morality. On the one hand, morality can be understood as the dictate of, or uncovered by, impartial reason. That which is (truly) moral must be capable of being verified by everyone’s reasoning from a suitably impartial perspective. If we are to respect the free and equal nature of each person, each must (in some sense) rationally validate the requirements of morality. If we take this view, the (...)
     
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  17. Saul Smilansky (2005). Free Will and Respect for Persons. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 29 (1):248-261.score: 486.0
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  18. Christine Doddington (2007). Critical Thinking as a Source of Respect for Persons: A Critique. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (4):449–459.score: 486.0
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  19. William Frankena (1986). The Ethics of Respect for Persons. Philosophical Topics 14 (2):149-67.score: 468.0
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  20. Jeffrey H. Barker & Lauren Polcrack (2001). Respect for Persons, Informed Consent Andthe Assessment of Infectious Disease Risks in Xenotransplantation. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (1):53-70.score: 459.0
    Given the increasing need for solid organ and tissue transplants and the decreasing supply of suitable allographic organs and tissue to meet this need, it is understandable that the hope for successful xenotransplantation has resurfaced in recent years. The biomedical obstacles to xenotransplantation encountered in previous attempts could be mitigated or overcome by developments in immunosuppression and especially by genetic manipulation of organ source animals. In this essay we consider the history of xenotransplantation, discuss the biomedical obstacles to success, explore (...)
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  21. Philip Pettit (1989). Consequentialism and Respect for Persons. Ethics 100 (1):116-126.score: 450.0
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  22. Barbara Herman (1984). Mutual Aid and Respect for Persons. Ethics 94 (4):577-602.score: 450.0
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  23. Leslie Green (2010). Two Worries About Respect for Persons. Ethics 120 (2):212-231.score: 450.0
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  24. M. Therese Lysaught (2004). Respect: Or, How Respect for Persons Became Respect for Autonomy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 29 (6):665 – 680.score: 450.0
  25. Dennis Klimchuk (2004). Three Accounts of Respect for Persons in Kant's Ethics. Kantian Review 8 (1):38-61.score: 450.0
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  26. Carl Cranor (1975). Toward a Theory of Respect for Persons. American Philosophical Quarterly 12 (4):309 - 319.score: 450.0
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  27. B. J. Diggs (1981). A Contractarian View of Respect for Persons. American Philosophical Quarterly 18 (4):273 - 283.score: 450.0
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  28. William K. Frankena (1986). The Ethics of Respect for Persons. Philosophical Topics 14 (2):149-167.score: 450.0
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  29. John E. Atwell (1982). Kant's Notion of Respect for Persons. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 31:17-30.score: 450.0
  30. S. I. Benn (1980). Privacy and Respect for Persons: A Reply. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (1):54 – 61.score: 450.0
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  31. Sarah Buss (2013). Respect for Persons. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (4):517-550.score: 450.0
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  32. M. Margaret Falls (1987). Retribution, Reciprocity, and Respect for Persons. Law and Philosophy 6 (1):25 - 51.score: 450.0
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  33. Timothy Madigan (1998). Kant, Prostitution & Respect for Persons. Philosophy Now 21:14-16.score: 450.0
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  34. Andreas Teuber (1983). Kant's Respect for Persons. Political Theory 11 (3):369-392.score: 450.0
  35. Carl Cranor (1980). Kant's Respect-for-Persons Principle. International Studies in Philosophy 12 (2):19-39.score: 450.0
  36. Ernesto V. Garcia (2012). A New Look at Kantian Respect for Persons. Kant Yearbook 4 (1).score: 450.0
  37. W. G. Maclagan (1960). Respect for Persons as a Moral Principle: I. Philosophy 35 (134):193 - 217.score: 450.0
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  38. Peter Glassen (1970). Respect for Persons. By R. S. Downie and Elizabeth Telfer. London: George Allen and Unwin Ltd., 1969. Pp. 165. £2.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 9 (03):465-467.score: 450.0
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  39. Stephen D. Hudson & Douglas N. Husak (1979). Benn on Privacy and Respect for Persons. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 57 (4):324 – 329.score: 450.0
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  40. Augustine Shutte (1981). Kant and Respect for Persons. Philosophical Papers 10 (1):1-8.score: 450.0
  41. Carl F. Cranor (1982). Limitations on Respect-for-Persons Theories. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 31:45-60.score: 450.0
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  42. Baruch A. Brody (1982). Towards a Theory of Respect for Persons. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 31:61-76.score: 450.0
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  43. Graham Haydon (2006). Respect for Persons and for Cultures as a Basis for National and Global Citizenship. Journal of Moral Education 35 (4):457-471.score: 450.0
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  44. H. D. Lewis (1971). Respect for Persons. By R. S. Downie and Elizabeth Telfer. (London: George Allen and Unwin Limited, 1969. Pp. 165. Price £2 Cloth, £1 Paper). [REVIEW] Philosophy 46 (177):282-.score: 450.0
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  45. David C. Hicks (1971). Respect for Persons and Respect for Living Things. Philosophy 46 (178):346 - 348.score: 450.0
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  46. Daniel R. Gilbert Jr (forthcoming). Respect for Persons, Management Theory, and Business Ethics. The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:111-120.score: 450.0
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  47. Charles Landesman (1982). Against Respect for Persons. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 31:31-43.score: 450.0
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  48. Moshe Weintraub & Y. Michael Barilan (2001). Persuasion as Respect for Persons: An Alternative View of Autonomy and of the Limits of Discourse. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 26 (1):13-34.score: 450.0
  49. Evan Simpson (1979). Objective Reason and Respect for Persons. The Monist 62 (4):457-469.score: 450.0
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  50. W. T. Blackstone (1968). “Comments on 'Justice as Respect for Persons'”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 6 (2):78-80.score: 450.0
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