Search results for 'Response Inhibition' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Angelos-Miltiadis Krypotos, Sara Jahfari, Vanessa A. van Ast, Merel Kindt & Birte U. Forstmann (2011). Individual Differences in Heart Rate Variability Predict the Degree of Slowing During Response Inhibition and Initiation in the Presence of Emotional Stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 90.0
    Response inhibition is a hallmark of executive control and crucial to support flexible behaviour in a constantly changing environment. Recently, it has been shown that response inhibition is influenced by the presentation of emotional stimuli (Verbruggen and De Houwer, 2007). Healthy individuals typically differ in the degree to which they are able to regulate their emotional state, but it remains unknown whether individual differences in emotion regulation (ER) may alter the interplay between emotion and response (...)
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  2. Mark J. Fenske Anne E. Ferrey, Alexandra Frischen (2012). Hot or Not: Response Inhibition Reduces the Hedonic Value and Motivational Incentive of Sexual Stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 90.0
    The motivational incentive of reward-related stimuli can become so salient that it drives behavior at the cost of other needs. Here we show that response inhibition applied during a Go/No-go task not only impacts hedonic evaluations but also reduces the behavioral incentive of motivationally-relevant stimuli. We first examined the impact of response inhibition on the hedonic value of sex stimuli associated with strong behavioral-approach responses (Experiment 1). Sexually-appealing and non-appealing images were both rated as less attractive (...)
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  3. Jessica R. Cohen, Robert F. Asarnow, Fred W. Sabb, Robert M. Bilder, Susan Y. Bookheimer, Barbara J. Knowlton & Russell A. Poldrack (2010). Decoding Developmental Differences and Individual Variability in Response Inhibition Through Predictive Analyses Across Individuals. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 90.0
    Response inhibition is thought to improve throughout childhood and into adulthood. Despite the relationship between age and the ability to stop ongoing behavior, questions remain regarding whether these age-related changes reflect improvements in response inhibition or in other factors that contribute to response performance variability. Functional neuroimaging data shows age-related changes in neural activity during response inhibition. While traditional methods of exploring neuroimaging data are limited to determining correlational relationships, newer methods can determine (...)
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  4. Eliza Congdon, Jeanette A. Mumford, Jessica R. Cohen, Adriana Galvan, Turhan Canli & Russell A. Poldrack (2012). Measurement and Reliability of Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 90.0
    Response inhibition plays a critical role in adaptive functioning and can be assessed with the Stop-signal task, which requires participants to suppress prepotent motor responses. Evidence suggests that this ability to inhibit a motor response that has already been initiated (reflected as Stop-signal reaction time (SSRT)) is a quantitative and heritable measure of interindividual variation in brain function. In order to examine the reliability of this measure, we pooled data across three separate studies and examined the influence (...)
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  5. Anne E. Ferrey, Alexandra Frischen & Mark J. Fenske (2012). Hot or Not: Response Inhibition Reduces the Hedonic Value and Motivational Incentive of Sexual Stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 90.0
    The motivational incentive of reward-related stimuli can become so salient that it drives behavior at the cost of other needs. Here we show that response inhibition applied during a Go/No-go task not only impacts hedonic evaluations but also reduces the behavioral incentive of motivationally-relevant stimuli. We first examined the impact of response inhibition on the hedonic value of sex stimuli associated with strong behavioral-approach responses (Experiment 1). Sexually-appealing and non-appealing images were both rated as less attractive (...)
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  6. Martin Eimer Monika Kiss, Jane E. Raymond, Nikki Westoby, Anna C. Nobre (2008). Response Inhibition is Linked to Emotional Devaluation: Behavioural and Electrophysiological Evidence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 90.0
    To study links between the inhibition of motor responses and emotional evaluation, we combined electrophysiological measures of prefrontal response inhibition with behavioural measures of affective evaluation. Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face. Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli. To study links between the efficiency of (...)
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  7. Christian Grillon Oliver J. Robinson, Marissa Krimsky (2013). The Impact of Induced Anxiety on Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
    Anxiety has wide reaching effects on cognition; evidenced most prominently by the ‘difficulties concentrating’ seen in anxiety disorders, and by adaptive harm-avoidant behaviors adopted under threatening circumstances. Despite having critical implications for daily-living, the precise impact of anxiety on cognition is as yet poorly quantified. Here we attempt to clarify the impact of anxiety on sustained attention and response inhibition via a translational anxiety induction in healthy individuals (N=22). Specifically, in a within-subjects design, participants completed the Sustained Attention (...)
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  8. Margot A. Schel & Eveline A. Crone (2013). Development of Response Inhibition in the Context of Relevant Versus Irrelevant Emotions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 90.0
    The present study examined the influence of relevant and irrelevant emotions on response inhibition from childhood to early adulthood. Ninety-four participants between 6 and 25 years of age performed two go/nogo tasks with emotional faces (neutral, happy, and fearful) as stimuli. In one go/nogo task emotion formed a relevant dimension of the task and in the other go/nogo task emotion was irrelevant and participants had to respond to the color of the faces instead. A special feature of the (...)
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  9. Diego Redolar-Ripoll Ignacio Obeso, Noemí Robles, Elena M. Marrón (2013). Dissociating the Role of the Pre-SMA in Response Inhibition and Switching: A Combined Online and Offline TMS Approach. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 87.0
    The pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) is considered to be a key node in the cognitive control of actions that require rapid updating, inhibition or switching, as well as working memory. It is now recognized that the pre-SMA is part of a ‘cognitive control’ network involving the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and subcortical regions, such as the striatum and subthalamic nucleus. However, two important questions remain to be addressed. First, it is not clear if the main role of the pre-SMA (...)
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  10. Martin Eimer & Friederike Schlaghecken (2002). Links Between Conscious Awareness and Response Inhibition: Evidence From Masked Priming. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 9 (3):514-520.score: 75.0
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  11. William W. Grings, Cheryl A. Carey & Anne M. Schell (1974). Comparison of Two Methods for Producing Response Inhibition in Electrodermal Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (4):658.score: 75.0
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  12. Kai Robin Grzyb & Ronald Hübner (2013). Strategic Modulation of Response Inhibition in Task-Switching. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 75.0
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  13. Isabel M. Birnbaum (1970). Response Selection and Retroactive Inhibition. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (3):406.score: 60.0
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  14. Mark J. Friedman & James H. Reynolds (1967). Retroactive Inhibition as a Function of Response-Class Similarity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 74 (3):351-355.score: 60.0
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  15. R. M. Gagné (1941). External Inhibition and Disinhibition in a Conditioned Operant Response. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (2):104.score: 60.0
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  16. Eliot Hearst & Gail B. Peterson (1973). Transfer of Conditioned Excitation and Inhibition From One Operant Response to Another. Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (3):360-368.score: 60.0
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  17. Horace G. Marchant & John W. Moore (1974). Below-Zero Conditioned Inhibition of the Rabbit's Nictitating Membrane Response. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (2):350.score: 60.0
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  18. Horace G. Marchant, Frederick W. Mis & John W. Moore (1972). Conditioned Inhibition of the Rabbit's Nictitating Membrane Response. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (2):408.score: 60.0
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  19. Ross L. Morgan & Benton J. Underwood (1950). Proactive Inhibition as a Function of Response Similarity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (5):592.score: 60.0
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  20. Sebastian Ocklenburg, Vanessa Ness, Onur Gunturkun, Boris Suchan & Christian Beste (2013). Response Inhibition is Modulated by Functional Cerebral Asymmetries for Facial Expression Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 60.0
    The efficacy of executive functions is critically modulated by information processing in earlier cognitive stages. For example, initial processing of verbal stimuli in the language-dominant left-hemisphere leads to more efficient response inhibition than initial processing of verbal stimuli in the non-dominant right hemisphere. However, it is unclear whether this organizational principle is specific for the language system, or a general principle that also applies to other types of lateralized cognition. To answer this question, we investigated the neurophysiological correlates (...)
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  21. James W. Pellegrino (1972). Effects of Intralist Response Formal Similarity Upon Paired-Associate Transfer and Retroactive Inhibition. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (1):134.score: 60.0
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  22. Paul S. Siegel (1950). Reactive Inhibition as a Function of Number of Response Evocations. Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (5):604.score: 60.0
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  23. Merrell E. Thompson & Jean P. Thompson (1949). Reactive Inhibition as a Factor in Maze Learning: II. The Role of Reactive Inhibition in Studies of Place Learning Versus Response Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (6):883.score: 60.0
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  24. Joel Nigg (2005). Reinforcement Gradient, Response Inhibition, Genetic Versus Experiential Effects, and Multiple Pathways to ADHD. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):437-438.score: 57.0
    Major contributions emanating from Sagvolden et al.'s theory include elucidation of the role in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) of temporal information processing, social learning, and response extinction learning. Key issues include a need for clearer explanation of the relative role of impulsivity versus response suppression/inhibition in the dual process model, and delineation of genotype-environment correlations versus interactions in the social and experiential mechanisms posited.
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  25. Philippe Boulinguez Marion Criaud, Claire Wardak, Suliann Ben Hamed, Bénédicte Ballanger (2012). Proactive Inhibitory Control of Response as the Default State of Executive Control. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 51.0
    Refraining from reacting does not only involve reactive inhibitory mechanisms. It was recently found that inhibitory control also relies strongly on proactive mechanisms. However, since most available studies have focused on reactive stopping, little is known about how proactive inhibition of response is implemented. Two behavioral experiments were conducted to identify the temporal dynamics of this executive function. They manipulated respectively the time during which inhibitory control must be sustained until a stimulus occurs, and the time limit allowed (...)
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  26. Anthony P. Zanesco, Brandon G. King, Katherine A. MacLean & Clifford D. Saron (2013). Executive Control and Felt Concentrative Engagement Following Intensive Meditation Training. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7 (566).score: 45.0
    Various forms of mental training have been shown to improve performance on cognitively demanding tasks. Individuals trained in meditative practices, for example, show generalized improvements on a variety of tasks assessing attentional performance. A central claim of this training, derived from contemplative traditions, posits that improved attentional performance is accompanied by subjective increases in the stability and clarity of concentrative engagement with one’s object of focus, as well as reductions in felt cognitive effort as expertise develops. However, despite frequent claims (...)
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  27. Ayla Barutchu, Olivia Carter, Robert Hester & Neil Levy (2013). Strength in Cognitive Self-Regulation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 45.0
    Failures in self-regulation are predictive of adverse cognitive, academic and vocational outcomes, yet the interplay between cognition and self-regulation failure remains elusive. Two experiments tested the hypothesis that lapses in self-regulation, as predicted by the strength model, can be induced in individuals using cognitive paradigms and whether such failures are related to cognitive performance. In Experiments 1, the stop-signal task (SST) was used to show reduced behavioural inhibition after performance of a cognitively demanding arithmetic task, but only in people (...)
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  28. Frederick Verbruggen & Jan De Houwer (2007). Do Emotional Stimuli Interfere with Response Inhibition? Evidence From the Stop Signal Paradigm. Cognition and Emotion 21 (2):391-403.score: 45.0
  29. Gabriela Garrido Rodriguez Ardi Roelofs, Vitória Piai (2011). Attentional Inhibition in Bilingual Naming Performance: Evidence From Delta-Plot Analyses. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 45.0
    It has been argued that inhibition is a mechanism of attentional control in bilingual language performance. Evidence suggests that effects of inhibition are largest in the tail of a response time (RT) distribution in non-linguistic and monolingual performance domains. We examined this for bilingual performance by conducting delta-plot analyses of naming RTs. Dutch-English bilingual speakers named pictures using English while trying to ignore superimposed neutral Xs or Dutch distractor words that were semantically related, unrelated, or translations. The (...)
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  30. Forstmann Birte (2011). How Visual Information Affects Decision Making, Interference Control and Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 45.0
  31. Alexander T. Sack Bruno Verschuere, Teresa Schuhmann (2012). Does the Inferior Frontal Sulcus Play a Functional Role in Deception? A Neuronavigated Theta-Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 45.0
    Background. By definition, lying involves withholding the truth. Response inhibition may therefore be the cognitive function at the heart of deception. Neuroimaging research has shown that the same brain region that is activated during response inhibition tasks, namely the inferior frontal region, is also activated during deception paradigms. This led to the hypothesis that the inferior frontal region is the neural substrate critically involved in withholding the truth. Objective. We critically examine the functional necessity of the (...)
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  32. Robert Hester Catherine Orr (2012). Error-Related Anterior Cingulate Cortex Activity and the Prediction of Conscious Error Awareness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 45.0
    Research examining the neural mechanisms associated with error awareness has consistently identified dorsal anterior cingulate activity (ACC) as necessary but not predictive of conscious error detection. Two recent studies (Steinhauser and Yeung, 2010; Wessel et al. 2011) have found a contrary pattern of greater dorsal ACC activity (in the form of the error-related negativity) during detected errors, but suggested that the greater activity may instead reflect task influences (e.g., response conflict, error probability) and or individual variability (e.g., statistical power). (...)
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  33. Gordon D. Logan Frederick Verbruggen (2008). Response Inhibition in the Stop-Signal Paradigm. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (11):418.score: 45.0
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  34. Cornelia Herbert & Stefan Sütterlin (2012). Do Not Respond! Doing the Think/No-Think and Go/No-Go Tasks Concurrently Leads to Memory Impairment of Unpleasant Items During Later Recall. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 45.0
    Previous research using neuroimaging methods proposed a link between mechanisms controlling motor response inhibition and suppression of unwanted memories. The present study investigated this hypothesis behaviorally by combining the think-no-think paradigm (TNT) with a go/no-go motor inhibition task. Participants first learned unpleasant cue-target pairs. Cue words were then presented as go or no-go items in the TNT. Participants’ task was to respond to the cues and think of the target word aloud or to inhibit their response (...)
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  35. Patrick Johnston (2011). Interrupting on-Going Action as a Form of Cognitive Control: Individual Differences and Electrophysiological Measures in Stopsignal Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 45.0
  36. Johnson Katherine, Healy Elaine, Dooley Barbara, Kelly Simon & McNicholas Fiona (2013). Children Born with Very Low Birth Weight Show Difficulties with Sustained Attention but Not Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 45.0
  37. Ogawa K. H. (2010). Reduced Response Inhibition Due to Threat-Related Distractors. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 45.0
  38. Monika Kiss, Jane E. Raymond, Nikki Westoby, Anna C. Nobre & Martin Eimer (2008). Frontiers: Response Inhibition is Linked to Emotional Devaluation: Behavioural and Electrophysiological Evidence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 45.0
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  39. Sander A. Los (2013). The Role of Response Inhibition in Temporal Preparation: Evidence From a Go/No-Go Task. Cognition 129 (2):328-344.score: 45.0
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  40. Bellgrove M. A. (2010). Monoaminergic Gene Variants Modulate Fronto-Striatal Response Inhibition Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 45.0
  41. Antoine Lutz Micah Allen, Jonathan Smallwood, Joanna Christensen, Daniel Gramm, Beinta Rasmussen, Christian Gaden Jensen, Andreas Roepstorff (2013). The Balanced Mind: The Variability of Task-Unrelated Thoughts Predicts Error Monitoring. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 45.0
    Self-generated thoughts unrelated to ongoing activities, also known as ‘mind-wandering’, make up a substantial portion of our daily lives. Reports of such task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs) predict both poor performance on demanding cognitive tasks and blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) activity in the default mode network (DMN). However, recent findings suggest that TUTs and the DMN can also facilitate metacognitive abilities and related behaviors. To further understand these relationships, we examined the influence of subjective intensity, ruminative quality, and variability of mind-wandering on response (...)
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  42. Catherine Orr & Robert Hester (2012). Error-Related Anterior Cingulate Cortex Activity and the Prediction of Conscious Error Awareness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 45.0
    Research examining the neural mechanisms associated with error awareness has consistently identified dorsal anterior cingulate activity (ACC) as necessary but not predictive of conscious error detection. Two recent studies (Steinhauser and Yeung, 2010; Wessel et al. 2011) have found a contrary pattern of greater dorsal ACC activity (in the form of the error-related negativity) during detected errors, but suggested that the greater activity may instead reflect task influences (e.g., response conflict, error probability) and or individual variability (e.g., statistical power). (...)
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  43. Sowman Paul (2012). Interactions Between Proactive and Reactive Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 45.0
  44. Thienel Renate, Mansfield Elise, Cooper Patrick, Heathcote Andrew, Forstmann Birte, Michie Pat, Cooper Gavin & Karayanidis Frini (2013). Brain Pathways Underlying Response Inhibition and Response Caution. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 45.0
  45. Hester Robert (2012). The Influence of Subliminal Threat Cues on Successful Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 45.0
  46. Bruno Verschuere, Teresa Schuhmann & Alexander T. Sack (2012). Does the Inferior Frontal Sulcus Play a Functional Role in Deception? A Neuronavigated Theta-Burst Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 45.0
    Background. By definition, lying involves withholding the truth. Response inhibition may therefore be the cognitive function at the heart of deception. Neuroimaging research has shown that the same brain region that is activated during response inhibition tasks, namely the inferior frontal region, is also activated during deception paradigms. This led to the hypothesis that the inferior frontal region is the neural substrate critically involved in withholding the truth. Objective. We critically examine the functional necessity of the (...)
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  47. Frederick Verbruggen & Gordon D. Logan (2008). Response Inhibition in the Stop-Signal Paradigm. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (11):418-424.score: 45.0
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  48. Kent M. Dallett (1962). The Role of Response Similarity in Proactive Inhibition. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (4):364.score: 42.0
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  49. James A. Cheyne Douglas O. Cheyne, Paul Ferrari (2012). Intended Actions and Unexpected Outcomes: Automatic and Controlled Processing in a Rapid Motor Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 42.0
    Human action involves a combination of controlled and automatic behavior. These processes may interact in tasks requiring rapid response selection or inhibition, where temporal constraints preclude timely intervention by conscious, controlled processes over automatized prepotent responses. Such contexts tend to produce frequent errors, but also rapidly executed correct responses, both of which may sometimes be perceived as surprising, unintended, or “automatic”. In order to identify neural processes underlying these two aspects of cognitive control, we measured neuromagnetic brain activity (...)
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  50. Ingrid K. Christoffels Wery P. M. Van den Wildenberg (2010). Stop Talking! Inhibition of Speech is Affected by Word Frequency and Dysfunctional Impulsivity. Frontiers in Psychology 1.score: 42.0
    Speaking is a complex natural behavior that most people master very well. Nevertheless, systematic investigation of the factors that affect adaptive control over speech production is relatively scarce. The present experiments quantified and compared inhibitory control over manual and verbal responses using the stop-signal paradigm. In tasks with only two response alternatives, verbal expressions were slower than manual responses, but the stopping latencies of hand and verbal actions were comparable. When engaged in a standard picture-naming task using a large (...)
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