Search results for 'Response Inhibition' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Martin Eimer Monika Kiss, Jane E. Raymond, Nikki Westoby, Anna C. Nobre (2008). Response Inhibition is Linked to Emotional Devaluation: Behavioural and Electrophysiological Evidence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 240.0
    To study links between the inhibition of motor responses and emotional evaluation, we combined electrophysiological measures of prefrontal response inhibition with behavioural measures of affective evaluation. Participants first performed a Go-Nogo task in response to Asian and Caucasian faces (with race determining their Go or Nogo status), followed by a trustworthiness rating for each face. Faces previously seen as Nogo stimuli were rated as less trustworthy than previous Go stimuli. To study links between the efficiency of (...)
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  2. Christian Grillon Oliver J. Robinson, Marissa Krimsky (2013). The Impact of Induced Anxiety on Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    Anxiety has wide reaching effects on cognition; evidenced most prominently by the ‘difficulties concentrating’ seen in anxiety disorders, and by adaptive harm-avoidant behaviors adopted under threatening circumstances. Despite having critical implications for daily-living, the precise impact of anxiety on cognition is as yet poorly quantified. Here we attempt to clarify the impact of anxiety on sustained attention and response inhibition via a translational anxiety induction in healthy individuals (N=22). Specifically, in a within-subjects design, participants completed the Sustained Attention (...)
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  3. Angelos-Miltiadis Krypotos, Sara Jahfari, Vanessa A. van Ast, Merel Kindt & Birte U. Forstmann (2011). Individual Differences in Heart Rate Variability Predict the Degree of Slowing During Response Inhibition and Initiation in the Presence of Emotional Stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 240.0
    Response inhibition is a hallmark of executive control and crucial to support flexible behaviour in a constantly changing environment. Recently, it has been shown that response inhibition is influenced by the presentation of emotional stimuli (Verbruggen and De Houwer, 2007). Healthy individuals typically differ in the degree to which they are able to regulate their emotional state, but it remains unknown whether individual differences in emotion regulation (ER) may alter the interplay between emotion and response (...)
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  4. Mark J. Fenske Anne E. Ferrey, Alexandra Frischen (2012). Hot or Not: Response Inhibition Reduces the Hedonic Value and Motivational Incentive of Sexual Stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    The motivational incentive of reward-related stimuli can become so salient that it drives behavior at the cost of other needs. Here we show that response inhibition applied during a Go/No-go task not only impacts hedonic evaluations but also reduces the behavioral incentive of motivationally-relevant stimuli. We first examined the impact of response inhibition on the hedonic value of sex stimuli associated with strong behavioral-approach responses (Experiment 1). Sexually-appealing and non-appealing images were both rated as less attractive (...)
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  5. Margot A. Schel & Eveline A. Crone (2013). Development of Response Inhibition in the Context of Relevant Versus Irrelevant Emotions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    The present study examined the influence of relevant and irrelevant emotions on response inhibition from childhood to early adulthood. Ninety-four participants between 6 and 25 years of age performed two go/nogo tasks with emotional faces (neutral, happy, and fearful) as stimuli. In one go/nogo task emotion formed a relevant dimension of the task and in the other go/nogo task emotion was irrelevant and participants had to respond to the color of the faces instead. A special feature of the (...)
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  6. Jessica R. Cohen, Robert F. Asarnow, Fred W. Sabb, Robert M. Bilder, Susan Y. Bookheimer, Barbara J. Knowlton & Russell A. Poldrack (2010). Decoding Developmental Differences and Individual Variability in Response Inhibition Through Predictive Analyses Across Individuals. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 240.0
    Response inhibition is thought to improve throughout childhood and into adulthood. Despite the relationship between age and the ability to stop ongoing behavior, questions remain regarding whether these age-related changes reflect improvements in response inhibition or in other factors that contribute to response performance variability. Functional neuroimaging data shows age-related changes in neural activity during response inhibition. While traditional methods of exploring neuroimaging data are limited to determining correlational relationships, newer methods can determine (...)
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  7. Eliza Congdon, Jeanette A. Mumford, Jessica R. Cohen, Adriana Galvan, Turhan Canli & Russell A. Poldrack (2012). Measurement and Reliability of Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Response inhibition plays a critical role in adaptive functioning and can be assessed with the Stop-signal task, which requires participants to suppress prepotent motor responses. Evidence suggests that this ability to inhibit a motor response that has already been initiated (reflected as Stop-signal reaction time (SSRT)) is a quantitative and heritable measure of interindividual variation in brain function. In order to examine the reliability of this measure, we pooled data across three separate studies and examined the influence (...)
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  8. Anne E. Ferrey, Alexandra Frischen & Mark J. Fenske (2012). Hot or Not: Response Inhibition Reduces the Hedonic Value and Motivational Incentive of Sexual Stimuli. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    The motivational incentive of reward-related stimuli can become so salient that it drives behavior at the cost of other needs. Here we show that response inhibition applied during a Go/No-go task not only impacts hedonic evaluations but also reduces the behavioral incentive of motivationally-relevant stimuli. We first examined the impact of response inhibition on the hedonic value of sex stimuli associated with strong behavioral-approach responses (Experiment 1). Sexually-appealing and non-appealing images were both rated as less attractive (...)
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  9. Diego Redolar-Ripoll Ignacio Obeso, Noemí Robles, Elena M. Marrón (2013). Dissociating the Role of the Pre-SMA in Response Inhibition and Switching: A Combined Online and Offline TMS Approach. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 234.0
    The pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) is considered to be a key node in the cognitive control of actions that require rapid updating, inhibition or switching, as well as working memory. It is now recognized that the pre-SMA is part of a ‘cognitive control’ network involving the inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and subcortical regions, such as the striatum and subthalamic nucleus. However, two important questions remain to be addressed. First, it is not clear if the main role of the pre-SMA (...)
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  10. Martin Eimer & Friederike Schlaghecken (2002). Links Between Conscious Awareness and Response Inhibition: Evidence From Masked Priming. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 9 (3):514-520.score: 210.0
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  11. Kai Robin Grzyb & Ronald Hübner (2013). Strategic Modulation of Response Inhibition in Task-Switching. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 210.0
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  12. William W. Grings, Cheryl A. Carey & Anne M. Schell (1974). Comparison of Two Methods for Producing Response Inhibition in Electrodermal Conditioning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (4):658.score: 210.0
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  13. Sebastian Ocklenburg, Vanessa Ness, Onur Gunturkun, Boris Suchan & Christian Beste (2013). Response Inhibition is Modulated by Functional Cerebral Asymmetries for Facial Expression Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 180.0
    The efficacy of executive functions is critically modulated by information processing in earlier cognitive stages. For example, initial processing of verbal stimuli in the language-dominant left-hemisphere leads to more efficient response inhibition than initial processing of verbal stimuli in the non-dominant right hemisphere. However, it is unclear whether this organizational principle is specific for the language system, or a general principle that also applies to other types of lateralized cognition. To answer this question, we investigated the neurophysiological correlates (...)
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  14. Joel Nigg (2005). Reinforcement Gradient, Response Inhibition, Genetic Versus Experiential Effects, and Multiple Pathways to ADHD. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):437-438.score: 174.0
    Major contributions emanating from Sagvolden et al.'s theory include elucidation of the role in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) of temporal information processing, social learning, and response extinction learning. Key issues include a need for clearer explanation of the relative role of impulsivity versus response suppression/inhibition in the dual process model, and delineation of genotype-environment correlations versus interactions in the social and experiential mechanisms posited.
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  15. Horace G. Marchant, Frederick W. Mis & John W. Moore (1972). Conditioned Inhibition of the Rabbit's Nictitating Membrane Response. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (2):408.score: 168.0
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  16. Isabel M. Birnbaum (1970). Response Selection and Retroactive Inhibition. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (3):406.score: 168.0
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  17. R. M. Gagné (1941). External Inhibition and Disinhibition in a Conditioned Operant Response. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (2):104.score: 168.0
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  18. Eliot Hearst & Gail B. Peterson (1973). Transfer of Conditioned Excitation and Inhibition From One Operant Response to Another. Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (3):360-368.score: 168.0
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  19. Ross L. Morgan & Benton J. Underwood (1950). Proactive Inhibition as a Function of Response Similarity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (5):592.score: 168.0
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  20. Paul S. Siegel (1950). Reactive Inhibition as a Function of Number of Response Evocations. Journal of Experimental Psychology 40 (5):604.score: 168.0
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  21. Merrell E. Thompson & Jean P. Thompson (1949). Reactive Inhibition as a Factor in Maze Learning: II. The Role of Reactive Inhibition in Studies of Place Learning Versus Response Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 39 (6):883.score: 168.0
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  22. Mark J. Friedman & James H. Reynolds (1967). Retroactive Inhibition as a Function of Response-Class Similarity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 74 (3):351-355.score: 168.0
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  23. Horace G. Marchant & John W. Moore (1974). Below-Zero Conditioned Inhibition of the Rabbit's Nictitating Membrane Response. Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (2):350.score: 168.0
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  24. James W. Pellegrino (1972). Effects of Intralist Response Formal Similarity Upon Paired-Associate Transfer and Retroactive Inhibition. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (1):134.score: 168.0
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  25. Frederick Verbruggen & Jan De Houwer (2007). Do Emotional Stimuli Interfere with Response Inhibition? Evidence From the Stop Signal Paradigm. Cognition and Emotion 21 (2):391-403.score: 150.0
  26. Forstmann Birte (2011). How Visual Information Affects Decision Making, Interference Control and Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 150.0
  27. Monika Kiss, Jane E. Raymond, Nikki Westoby, Anna C. Nobre & Martin Eimer (2008). Frontiers: Response Inhibition is Linked to Emotional Devaluation: Behavioural and Electrophysiological Evidence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2.score: 150.0
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  28. Frederick Verbruggen & Gordon D. Logan (2008). Response Inhibition in the Stop-Signal Paradigm. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (11):418-424.score: 150.0
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  29. Gordon D. Logan Frederick Verbruggen (2008). Response Inhibition in the Stop-Signal Paradigm. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (11):418.score: 150.0
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  30. Patrick Johnston (2011). Interrupting on-Going Action as a Form of Cognitive Control: Individual Differences and Electrophysiological Measures in Stopsignal Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 150.0
  31. Johnson Katherine, Healy Elaine, Dooley Barbara, Kelly Simon & McNicholas Fiona (2013). Children Born with Very Low Birth Weight Show Difficulties with Sustained Attention but Not Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 150.0
  32. Ogawa K. H. (2010). Reduced Response Inhibition Due to Threat-Related Distractors. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 150.0
  33. Sander A. Los (2013). The Role of Response Inhibition in Temporal Preparation: Evidence From a Go/No-Go Task. Cognition 129 (2):328-344.score: 150.0
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  34. Bellgrove M. A. (2010). Monoaminergic Gene Variants Modulate Fronto-Striatal Response Inhibition Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 150.0
  35. Sowman Paul (2012). Interactions Between Proactive and Reactive Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 150.0
  36. Thienel Renate, Mansfield Elise, Cooper Patrick, Heathcote Andrew, Forstmann Birte, Michie Pat, Cooper Gavin & Karayanidis Frini (2013). Brain Pathways Underlying Response Inhibition and Response Caution. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 150.0
  37. Hester Robert (2012). The Influence of Subliminal Threat Cues on Successful Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 150.0
  38. Kent M. Dallett (1962). The Role of Response Similarity in Proactive Inhibition. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (4):364.score: 132.0
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  39. Andrea M. Allan, John E. Desmond, Ellen R. Stockman, Anthony G. Romano, John W. Moore, Christopher H. Yeo & I. Steele-Russell (1980). Efficient Conditioned Inhibition of the Rabbit's Nictitating Membrane Response with Massed Training. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 16 (5):321-324.score: 120.0
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  40. Fox Allison, Connaughton Veronica, Bothma Vicole, Clunies-Ross Karen & Amiruddin Azhani (2013). Response Conflict and Inhibition: Electrophysiological Indices Elicited During a Modified Flanker Task. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 120.0
  41. Diana E. J. Blazis & John W. Moore (1982). Naloxone Does Not Impair Conditioned Inhibition of the Rabbit's Nictitating Membrane Response. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 20 (2):122-123.score: 120.0
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  42. William J. Mahoney, Suzanne E. Kwaterski & John W. Moore (1975). Conditioned Inhibition of the Rabbit Nictitating Membrane Response as a Function of CS-UCS Interval. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 5 (2):177-179.score: 120.0
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  43. Douglas Anger (1988). The Balance Equation: Part 2. Derivation of the Balance Equation for Response-Specific Inhibition. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (1):55-58.score: 120.0
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  44. Douglas Anger (1987). The Balance Equation: Part 1. Response-Specific Inhibition and the Operant-Contingency Puzzles. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (6):468-471.score: 120.0
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  45. Carsten N. Boehler, Jens-Max Hopf, Christian M. Stoppel & Ruth M. Krebs (2012). Motivating Inhibition – Reward Prospect Speeds Up Response Cancellation. Cognition 125 (3):498-503.score: 120.0
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  46. Margaret E. Clarke & Ralph B. Hupka (1974). The Effects of Stimulus Duration and Frequency of Daily Preconditioning Stimulus Exposures on Latent Inhibition in Pavlovian Conditioning of the Rabbit Nictitating Membrane Response. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 4 (4):225-228.score: 120.0
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  47. Matthew J. Ellis, Li Ding, Dong Shen, Jingqin Luo, Vera J. Suman, John W. Wallis, Brian A. Van Tine, Jeremy Hoog, Reece J. Goiffon & Theodore C. Goldstein (2012). Whole-Genome Analysis Informs Breast Cancer Response to Aromatase Inhibition. In Jeffrey Kastner (ed.), Nature. Mit Press. 353-360.score: 120.0
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  48. Melvin H. Marx & Yung Che Kim (1984). Inhibition of Learned-Response Availability: Reduction of Cued Retrieval by Frequency of Occurrence and Prior Recall of Target Words. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 22 (1):29-32.score: 120.0
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  49. Z. Michael Nagy, James W. Burley & Linda K. Kikstadt (1977). Competing Response Decrement as a Measure of Escape Learning and Memory in Young Mice: Effect of Learned Inhibition, Maturation, or Age-Dependent Shock Sensitivity? Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 10 (1):21-24.score: 120.0
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  50. Paul R. Solomon, A. Craig Lohr & John W. Moore (1974). Latent Inhibition of the Rabbit's Nictitating Membrane Response: Summation Tests for Active Inhibition as a Function of Number of CS Preexposures. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 4 (6):557-559.score: 120.0
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