Search results for 'Responsibility Social aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Grażyna Bartkowiak (2006). Practical Aspects of a Social Responsibility in Business. Dialogue and Universalism 16 (5-6):133-140.score: 279.0
    The subject of the article is social responsibility of business and the role of social responsibility in the daily activity of companies as reliable partners in business.The paper consists of two parts: the theoretical one and the empirical one. In the theoretical part the author describes the areas of social responsibility and the examples of socially responsible actions. In the empirical part the author presents the research study carried out in the following groups of (...)
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  2. Juan José Tarí (2011). Research Into Quality Management and Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):623-638.score: 267.0
    This article presents a systematic literature review on quality management and social responsibility (focusing on ethical and social issues). It uses the literature review to identify the parallels between quality management and social responsibility, the extent to which qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods are used, the countries that have contributed most to this area, and how the most common quality management practices facilitate social responsibility. The literature review covers articles about quality management and (...)
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  3. Ma Del Mar García de Los Salmones, Angel Herrero Crespo & Ignacio Rodríguez Del Bosque (2005). Influence of Corporate Social Responsibility on Loyalty and Valuation of Services. Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):369 - 385.score: 267.0
    The study of corporate social responsibility has been the object of much research in recent decades, although there is a need to continue investigating its benefits as a marketing tool. In the current work we adopt a multidimensional perspective of social responsibility, and we carry out market research to determine the perceptions of users of mobile telephone services about economic, legal, ethical and social aspects of their operating companies. With these data we determine the (...)
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  4. Cristina Brandão, Guilhermina Rego, Ivone Duarte & Rui Nunes (2013). Social Responsibility: A New Paradigm of Hospital Governance? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (4):390-402.score: 267.0
    Changes in modern societies originate the perception that ethical behaviour is essential in organization’s practices especially in the way they deal with aspects such as human rights. These issues are usually under the umbrella of the concept of social responsibility. Recently the Report of the International Bioethics Committee of UNESCO on Social Responsibility and Health has addressed this concept of social responsibility in the context of health care delivery suggesting a new paradigm in (...)
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  5. Susanne Arvidsson (2010). Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Study of the Views of Management Teams in Large Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):339 - 354.score: 261.0
    In light of the many corporate scandals, social and ethical commitment of society has increased considerably, which puts pressure on companies to communicate information related to corporate social responsibility (CSR). The reasons underlying the decision by management teams to engage in ethical communication are scarcely focussed on. Thus, grounded on legitimacy and stakeholder theory, this study analyses the views management teams in large listed companies have on communication of CSR. The focus is on aspects on interest, (...)
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  6. Adam Lindgreen, Valérie Swaen & Wesley J. Johnston (2009). Corporate Social Responsibility: An Empirical Investigation of U.S. Organizations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):303 - 323.score: 261.0
    Organizations that believe they should "give something back" to the society have embraced the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Although the theoretical underpinnings of CSR have been frequently debated, empirical studies often involve only limited aspects, implying that theory may not be congruent with actual practices and may impede understanding and further development of CSR. The authors investigate actual CSR practices related to five different stakeholder groups, develop an instrument to measure those CSR practices, and apply (...)
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  7. MaryAnn Reynolds & Kristi Yuthas (2008). Moral Discourse and Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):47 - 64.score: 261.0
    This paper examines voluntary corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting as a form of moral discourse. It explores how alternative stakeholder perspectives lead to differing perceptions of the process and content of responsible reporting. We contrast traditional stakeholder theory, which views stakeholders as external parties having a social contract with corporations, with an emerging perspective, which views interaction among corporations and constituents as relational in nature. This moves the stakeholder from an external entity to one that is integral (...)
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  8. Lutz Preuss & Jack Perschke (2010). Slipstreaming the Larger Boats: Social Responsibility in Medium-Sized Businesses. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):531 - 551.score: 261.0
    Studies into corporate social responsibility (CSR) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have suggested that small businesses are different to the large companies on which CSR research usually focusses. Extending this argument, this article raises the question what differences in approaches to CSR there are within the SME category. Analysing the CSR strategy and performance of a medium-sized fashion retailer in the United Kingdom through manager interviews as well as customer and employee surveys, the article develops an analytical (...)
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  9. Johan J. Graafland, S. C. W. Eijffinger & H. SmidJohan (2004). Benchmarking of Corporate Social Responsibility: Methodological Problems and Robustness. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):137-152.score: 261.0
    This paper investigates the possibilities and problems of benchmarking Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). After a methodological analysis of the advantages and problems of benchmarking, we develop a benchmark method that includes economic, social and environmental aspects as well as national and international aspects of CSR. The overall benchmark is based on a weighted average of these aspects. The weights are based on the opinions of companies and NGO's. Using different methods of weighting, we find (...)
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  10. Ton van der Wiele, Peter Kok, Richard McKenna & Alan Brown (2001). A Corporate Social Responsibility Audit Within a Quality Management Framework. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (4):285 - 297.score: 261.0
    In this paper a corporate social responsibility audit is developed following the underlying methodology of the quality award/excellence models. Firstly the extent to which the quality awards already incorporate the development of social responsibility is examined by looking at the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and the European Quality Award. It will be shown that the quality awards do not yet include ethical aspects in relation to social responsibility. Both a clear definition of (...)
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  11. Lois Schafer Mahoney & Linda Thorn (2006). An Examination of the Structure of Executive Compensation and Corporate Social Responsibility: A Canadian Investigation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 69 (2):149 - 162.score: 261.0
    We explore the extent to which Boards use executive compensation to incite firms to act in accordance with social and environmental objectives (e.g., Johnson, R. and D. Greening: 1999, Academy of Management Journal 42(5), 564-578; Kane, E. J.: 2002, Journal of Banking and Finance 26, 1919-1933.). We examine the association between executive compensation and corporate social responsibility (CSR) for 77 Canadian firms using three key components of executives' compensation structure: salary, bonus, and stock options. Similar to prior (...)
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  12. Peter Kok, Ton van der Wiele, Richard McKenna & Alan Brown (2001). A Corporate Social Responsibility Audit Within a Quality Management Framework. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (4):285 - 297.score: 261.0
    In this paper a corporate social responsibility audit is developed following the underlying methodology of the quality award/excellence models. Firstly the extent to which the quality awards already incorporate the development of social responsibility is examined by looking at the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and the European Quality Award. It will be shown that the quality awards do not yet include ethical aspects in relation to social responsibility. Both a clear definition of (...)
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  13. Sun Young Lee & Craig E. Carroll (2011). The Emergence, Variation, and Evolution of Corporate Social Responsibility in the Public Sphere, 1980–2004: The Exposure of Firms to Public Debate. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (1):115-131.score: 261.0
    This study examined the emergence of corporate social responsibility (CSR) as a public issue over 25 years using a content analysis of two national news- papers and seven regional, geographically-dispersed newspapers in the U.S. The present study adopted a comprehensive definition encompassing all four CSR dimensions: economic, ethical, legal, and philanthropic. This study examined newspaper editorials, letters to the editor, op-ed columns, news analyses, and guest columns for three aspects: media attention, media prominence, and media valence. Results (...)
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  14. Jason Q. Zhang, Hong Zhu & Hung-bin Ding (2013). Board Composition and Corporate Social Responsibility: An Empirical Investigation in the Post Sarbanes-Oxley Era. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):381-392.score: 261.0
    Although the composition of the board of directors has important implications for different aspects of firm performance, prior studies tend to focus on financial performance. The effects of board composition on corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance remain an under-researched area, particularly in the period following the enactment of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX). This article specifically examines two important aspects of board composition (i.e., the presence of outside directors and the presence of women directors) and (...)
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  15. Luc Fransen (2013). The Embeddedness of Responsible Business Practice: Exploring the Interaction Between National-Institutional Environments and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):213-227.score: 261.0
    Academic literature recognizes that firms in different countries deal with corporate social responsibility (CSR) in different ways. Because of this, analysts presume that variations in national-institutional arrangements affect CSR practices. Literature, however, lacks specificity in determining, first, what parts of national political-economic configurations actually affect CSR practices; second, the precise aspects of CSR affected by national-institutional variables; third, how causal mechanisms between national-institutional framework variables and aspects of CSR practices work. Because of this the literature is (...)
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  16. Gail Ridley (2011). National Security as a Corporate Social Responsibility: Critical Infrastructure Resilience. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):111-125.score: 261.0
    This article argues for an extension to the scope of corporate social responsibility (CSR) research to include a contemporary issue of importance to national and global security, critical infrastructure resilience. Rather than extending the multiple perspectives on CSR, this study aimed to identify a method of recognising CSR-related issues, before applying it to two dissimilar case studies on critical infrastructure resilience. One case study was of an international telecommunications company based in the US while the other was of (...)
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  17. M. C. Arruda (2009). Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility in Latin American Small and Medium Sized Enterprises: Challenging Development. African Journal of Business Ethics 4 (2):37.score: 261.0
    Considering the lack of substantive scientific or theoretical studies about ethics in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in Latin America, this paper examines the context of an existent paradox, based upon the perspective of experts and academicians of Latin America and the Caribbean. These countries live different realities, due to their respective European cultural influences, as well as to racial and economic issues. Such facts impact the size and characteristics of their industries. On the other hand, the SMEs face (...)
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  18. Saurabh Mishra & Sachin B. Modi (2013). Positive and Negative Corporate Social Responsibility, Financial Leverage, and Idiosyncratic Risk. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):431-448.score: 261.0
    Existing research on the financial implications of corporate social responsibility (CSR) for firms has predominantly focused on positive aspects of CSR, overlooking that firms also undertake actions and initiatives that qualify as negative CSR. Moreover, studies in this area have not investigated how both positive and negative CSR affect the financial risk of firms. As such, in this research, the authors provide a framework linking both positive and negative CSR to idiosyncratic risk of firms. While investigating these (...)
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  19. Michael S. Aßländer (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility as Subsidiary Co-Responsibility: A Macroeconomic Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (1):115 - 128.score: 261.0
    Recent discussion on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) mainly focuses on two aspects of CSR: from a technical perspective, CSR aims to improve ethical standards in the organizational decision-making process, and should guarantee that management practices are in accordance with commonly accepted standards of behavior. From a political perspective, CSR describes corporate engagement with ecological and social issues that extend beyond the firm's economic activities. The latter perspective in particular leaves unclear whether such corporate contributions to solve (...)
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  20. Sugan C. Jain, Dilip Kumar Sen, Muinuddin Khan & Swapan Kumar Bala (2007). An Analytical Study on Social Responsibility Performance Evaluation as an Accounting Measure of Management Efficiency. AI and Society 21 (3):251-266.score: 261.0
    This paper is a portrayal of how social responsibility performance evaluation can act as an accounting measure of management efficiency. In fact, it has given much importance to socio-economic and socio-human obligations to others. The paper attempts to show that these days there is a great need to emphasise more clearly social responsibility, which the corporate sector can and should undertake. The theme of the paper is that the scope of corporate social responsibility encompasses (...)
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  21. Tracy Lynn Isaacs (2011). Moral Responsibility in Collective Contexts. Oxford University Press.score: 243.0
    Intentional collective action -- Collective moral responsibility -- Collective guilt -- Individual responsibility for (and in) collective wrongs -- Collective obligation, individual obligation, and individual moral responsibility -- Individual moral responsibility in wrongful social practice.
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  22. Barry Castro (ed.) (1996). Business and Society: A Reader in the History, Sociology, and Ethics of Business. Oxford University Press.score: 216.0
    Combining perspectives on the interplay of two areas of primary importance to our lives--business and society--this anthology brings together a wide range of readings on the subject. Topics covered include the historical evolution of the business enterprise, the emergence and development of the labor force, and the impact of the international marketplace. Barry Castro concentrates on the moral and social aspects of business, the way it affects national economy, the environment, careers, the disadvantaged, government, and public opinion. Considering (...)
     
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  23. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.score: 213.0
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  24. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.score: 213.0
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  25. Ramesh Chandra Tewari, Kr̥shṇanātha & Bstan-ʼdzin-Rgya-Mtsho (eds.) (1996). Universal Responsibility: A Felicitation Volume in Honour of His Holiness the Fourteenth Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso, on His Sixtieth Birthday. Aʻnʼb Publishers.score: 207.0
     
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  26. Kevin Gibson (2007). Ethics and Business: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 198.0
    In this lively undergraduate textbook, Kevin Gibson explores the relationship between ethics and the world of business, and how we can serve the interests of both. He builds a philosophical groundwork that can be applied to a wide range of issues in ethics and business, and shows readers how to assess dilemmas critically and work to resolve them on a principled basis. Using case studies drawn from around the world, he examines topics including stakeholder responsibilities, sustainability, corporate social (...), and women and business. Because business can no longer be isolated from its effects on communities and the environment, these concerns are brought to the forefront. The book also captures the dynamic nature of business ethics in the era of globalization where jobs can be outsourced, products are made of components from scores of countries and sweatshops often provide the cheap goods the public demands. (shrink)
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  27. Norman E. Bowie (2005). Management Ethics. Blackwell Pub..score: 198.0
    My station and its duties : the function of being a manager -- Stockholder management or stakeholder management -- The ethical treatment of employees -- The ethical treatment of customers -- Supply chain management and other issues -- Corporate social responsibility -- Moral imagination, stakeholder theory and systems thinking : one approach to management decision-making -- Leadership.
     
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  28. Jesús Conill Sancho, Christoph Luetge & Tatjana Schó̈nwälder-Kuntze (eds.) (2008). Corporate Citizenship, Contractarianism and Ethical Theory: On Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Ashgate Pub. Company.score: 198.0
    This study provides a representation of the broad spectrum of theoretical work on topics related to business ethics, with a particular focus on corporate citizenship. It considers relations of business and society alongside social responsibility and moves on to examine the historical and systemic foundations of business ethics, focusing on the concepts of social and ethical responsibilities. The contributors explore established theories and concepts and their impact on moral behaviour. Together, the contributions offer varied philosophical theories in (...)
     
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  29. Coral B. Ingley (2008). Company Growth and Board Attitudes to Corporate Social Responsibility. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 4 (1):17-39.score: 189.0
    Companies are beginning to recognise the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as presenting a new business model and an opportunity for building innovative forms of competitive advantage. Boards are instrumental in shaping and overseeing such strategies and active engagement around what it means to be a responsible and responsive enterprise can strengthen the Board's potential as a strategic influence on long-term value creation. Yet many companies align with Friedman's contention that adopting and practising CSR is a distraction (...)
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  30. Ronald Paul Hill (2004). The Socially-Responsible University: Talking the Talk While Walking the Walk in the College of Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 2 (1):89-100.score: 189.0
    This article presents a stakeholder-based example of corporate social responsibility (CSR) within a university context. The first section provides a literature review that builds the case for CSR efforts by educational institutions. The next section details aspects of the focal corporate social responsibility program at the University of South Florida St. Petersburg (USFSP) from its early conception to its implementation. The Talking the Talk section describes the overarching mission of the larger university and its influence (...)
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  31. Ann Ferguson (1997). Moral Responsibility and Social Change: A New Theory of Self. Hypatia 12 (3):116-141.score: 189.0
    The aim of this essay is to rethink classic issues of freedom and moral responsibility in the context of feminist and antiracist theories of male and white domination. If personal identities are socially constructed by gender, race and ethnicity, class and sexual orientation, how are social change and moral responsibility possible? An aspects theory of selfhood and three reinterpretations of identity politics show how individuals are morally responsible and nonessentialist ways to resist social oppression.
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  32. Heidi S. C. A. MuijenHeidi (2004). Corporate Social Responsibility Starts at University. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):235-246.score: 189.0
    The author addresses the question of how to use value-learning processes to integrate corporate social responsibility (CSR) in organizations as an interesting challenge in (higher) education. Two strategies have been proposed for the issue of CSR: a compliance strategy and a cultural change strategy (Karssing, 2001). This article focuses on the ethical and philosophical presuppositions of these different approaches. The incorporation of CSR in organizations cannot be accomplished by means of a compliance strategy only. Rather, it needs to (...)
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  33. Mark D. Promislo, Robert A. Giacalone & Jeremy Welch (2012). Consequences of Concern: Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Well-Being. Business Ethics 21 (2):209-219.score: 189.0
    Prior research has studied the antecedents of beliefs regarding ethics and social responsibility (ESR). However, few studies have examined how individual well-being may be related to such beliefs. In this exploratory study, we assessed the relationship between perceived importance of ESR – both individually and of one's company – and indicators of physical and psychological well-being. Results demonstrated that perceived importance of ESR was associated with three aspects of well-being: exuberance for life, sleep problems, and job stress. (...)
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  34. Merja Lähdesmäki (2012). Construction of Owner–Manager Identity in Corporate Social Responsibility Discourse. Business Ethics 21 (2):168-182.score: 189.0
    This article examines the different discursive resources on which small business owner–managers draw when understanding their sense of self in relation to corporate social responsibility. In the small business context, identity provides a justifiable framework to study corporate social responsibility, as decisions regarding socially responsible activities are mainly taken by managers and stem from their sense of who they are in the world. On the basis of 25 thematic interviews with owner–managers, two broad discursive resources were (...)
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  35. Petya Puncheva-Michelotti, Marco Michelotti & Peter Gahan (2010). The Relationship Between Individuals' Recognition of Human Rights and Responses to Socially Responsible Companies: Evidence From Russia and Bulgaria. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):583 - 605.score: 189.0
    An emerging body of literature has highlighted a gap in our understanding of the extent to which the salience attached to human rights is likely to influence the extent to which an individual takes account of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) in decision making. The primary aim of this study is to begin to address this gap by understanding how individuals attribute different emphasis on specific aspects of human rights when making decisions to purchase, work, invest or support (...)
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  36. Alan E. Singer (2013). Corporate Political Activity, Social Responsibility, and Competitive Strategy: An Integrative Model. Business Ethics 22 (3):308-324.score: 189.0
    Many tensions exist within the nexus of corporate social responsibility, competitive strategy, and political activity. Previously, these aspects of strategic management have been considered in relative isolation or at best in pairs. Accordingly, an attempt is made here to set out a general strategic problem of the corporation, in which all three aspects are combined. This project reveals a particular need to explicate the political assumptions held by or on behalf of the corporation. Examples might include (...)
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  37. Steven E. Wallis (2010). Developing Effective Ethics for Effective Behavior. Social Responsibility Journal 6 (4):536-550.score: 189.0
    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the internal structure of Gandhi's ethics as a way to determine opportunities for improving that system's ability to influence behavior. In this paper, the author aims to work under the idea that a system of ethics is a guide for social responsibility. -/- Design/methodology/approach – The data source is Gandhi's set of ethics as described by Naess. These simple (primarily quantitative) studies compare the concepts within the code of (...)
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  38. Johan Graafland & Lei Zhang (2014). Corporate Social Responsibility in China: Implementation and Challenges. Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (1):34-49.score: 189.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is becoming increasingly important in China. This paper investigates the implementation of instruments for dimensions of CSR that are relevant for the Chinese context and the challenges that Chinese companies face. Based on a survey among 109 Chinese companies, we find that formal instruments to implement CSR are rather common. Companies spend most effort in improving the economic aspects of CSR, such as competitiveness, product innovation and process innovation. Only a small minority of (...)
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  39. Patricia Debeljuh & Angeles Destefano (2005). An Inside Look Into Teaching Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics Education 2 (2):137-150.score: 189.0
    This study investigates the effects of making academic space for service learning that emphasizes the importance of active participation in society. We describe several projects of professional practice performed by students at our university with the objective of satisfying the needs of NGOs. The practice will allow for a meeting between academic learning of CSR and the needs of the community, articulated through voluntary practice. The final goal is to guide students through the process of facing the needs of their (...)
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  40. Marta de la Cuesta-González, María Jesús Muñoz-Torres & María Ángeles Fernández-Izquierdo (2006). Analysis of Social Performance in the Spanish Financial Industry Through Public Data. A Proposal. Journal of Business Ethics 69 (3):289-304.score: 186.0
    Banking firms are becoming increasingly aware that their clients’ management of environmental and social risks may in term threaten their own business as lenders and investors. In addition, stakeholders are requiring banks to improve their social performance. As a result, some banks are developing corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies and management systems to reduce potential risks and improve their performance. In the Spanish financial system, half of the banking firms are savings banks, most of which have (...)
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  41. Jennifer Kuzma & Aliya Kuzhabekova (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility for Nanotechnology Oversight. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (4):407-419.score: 183.0
    Growing public concern and uncertainties surrounding emerging technologies suggest the need for socially-responsible behavior of companies in the development and implementation of oversight systems for them. In this paper, we argue that corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an important aspect of nanotechnology oversight given the role of trust in shaping public attitudes about nanotechnology and the lack of data about the health and environmental risks of nanoproducts. We argue that CSR is strengthened by the adoption of stakeholder-driven models (...)
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  42. Wickramanayake Abeysinghe (2000). In Search of Human Duties Via the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. S. Godage & Brothers.score: 180.0
  43. Benjamin Weil (2010). Verantwortung, Risiko, Identität: Ein Soziologischer Blick Auf Verantwortungsphänomene. Tectum Verlag.score: 180.0
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  44. Stephanie Kaza & Kenneth Kraft (eds.) (2000). Dharma Rain: Sources of Buddhist Environmentalism. Shambhala Publications.score: 174.0
    A comprehensive collection of classic texts, contemporary interpretations, guidelines for activists, issue-specific information, and materials for environmentally-oriented religious practice. Sources and contributors include Basho, the Dalai Lama, Thich Nhat Hanh, Gary Snyder, Chogyam Trungpa, Gretel Ehrlich, Peter Mathiessen, Helen Tworkov (editor of Tricycle ), and Philip Glass.
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  45. Adrian Henriques (2007). Corporate Truth: The Limits to Transparency. Earthscan.score: 174.0
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes 10 sider ad gangen og max. 40 sider pr. session.
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  46. Gerald F. Cavanagh (2006). American Business Values: A Global Perspective. Pearson/Prentice Hall.score: 174.0
    A free markets needs ethical norms -- Moral maturity -- Ethics in business -- History of business values -- Factories, immigrants, and wealth -- Critics of capitalism -- Personal values and the firm -- Leaders, trust and watchdogs -- Globalization's impact on American values -- Future business values and sustainability.
     
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  47. Tad Tuleja (1985/1987). Beyond the Bottom Line: How Business Leaders Are Turning Principles Into Profits. Penguin Books.score: 174.0
     
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  48. László Zsolnai (ed.) (2004). Spirituality and Ethics in Management. Kluwer Academic.score: 171.0
    This book is a collection of scholarly papers, which focus on the role of spirituality and ethics in renewing contemporary management praxis. The basic argument is that a more inclusive, holistic and peaceful approach to management is needed if business and political leaders are to uplift the environmentally degrading and socially disintegrating world of our age. The book uses diverse value-perspectives (Hinduism, Catholicism, Buddhism and Humanism) and a variety of disciplines to extend traditional reflections on corporate purpose. It focuses on (...)
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  49. Vincent Di Norcia (1998). Hard Like Water: Ethics in Business. Oxford University Press Canada.score: 171.0
    Hard Like Water represents a uniquely Canadian, and international, perspective in a field largely dominated by US writers. The accessible book sets up a "core ethic" that helps the reader to link a few, familiar core values: care for life, welfare, honest communication, and civil rights, with business practices. These values are supplemented by five performance maxims: do no harm; solve the problem; enable informed choice; act, learn, improve; and seek the common good. The book is designed to show (...)
     
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  50. Carla Millar & Eve Poole (eds.) (2010). Ethical Leadership: Global Challenges and Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 171.0
    Ethical leadership in a global world, and a roadmap to the book -- Corporate psychopaths -- CEOs and corporate social performance -- CEOs and financial misreporting -- Life at the sharp end -- Inclusive leadership in Nicaragua and the DRC -- A new ideal leadership profile for Romania -- Virtue-based leadership in the UK and Nigeria -- Chinese folk wisdom : leading with traditional values -- Leading ethically : what helps and what hinders -- Beyond compliance -- A moral (...)
     
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