Search results for 'Responsibility Social aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Grażyna Bartkowiak (2006). Practical Aspects of a Social Responsibility in Business. Dialogue and Universalism 16 (5-6):133-140.score: 93.0
    The subject of the article is social responsibility of business and the role of social responsibility in the daily activity of companies as reliable partners in business.The paper consists of two parts: the theoretical one and the empirical one. In the theoretical part the author describes the areas of social responsibility and the examples of socially responsible actions. In the empirical part the author presents the research study carried out in the following groups of (...)
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  2. Juan José Tarí (2011). Research Into Quality Management and Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (4):623-638.score: 89.0
    This article presents a systematic literature review on quality management and social responsibility (focusing on ethical and social issues). It uses the literature review to identify the parallels between quality management and social responsibility, the extent to which qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods are used, the countries that have contributed most to this area, and how the most common quality management practices facilitate social responsibility. The literature review covers articles about quality management and (...)
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  3. Ma Del Mar García de Los Salmones, Angel Herrero Crespo & Ignacio Rodríguez Del Bosque (2005). Influence of Corporate Social Responsibility on Loyalty and Valuation of Services. Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):369 - 385.score: 89.0
    The study of corporate social responsibility has been the object of much research in recent decades, although there is a need to continue investigating its benefits as a marketing tool. In the current work we adopt a multidimensional perspective of social responsibility, and we carry out market research to determine the perceptions of users of mobile telephone services about economic, legal, ethical and social aspects of their operating companies. With these data we determine the (...)
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  4. Cristina Brandão, Guilhermina Rego, Ivone Duarte & Rui Nunes (2013). Social Responsibility: A New Paradigm of Hospital Governance? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (4):390-402.score: 89.0
    Changes in modern societies originate the perception that ethical behaviour is essential in organization’s practices especially in the way they deal with aspects such as human rights. These issues are usually under the umbrella of the concept of social responsibility. Recently the Report of the International Bioethics Committee of UNESCO on Social Responsibility and Health has addressed this concept of social responsibility in the context of health care delivery suggesting a new paradigm in (...)
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  5. Susanne Arvidsson (2010). Communication of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Study of the Views of Management Teams in Large Companies. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 96 (3):339 - 354.score: 87.0
    In light of the many corporate scandals, social and ethical commitment of society has increased considerably, which puts pressure on companies to communicate information related to corporate social responsibility (CSR). The reasons underlying the decision by management teams to engage in ethical communication are scarcely focussed on. Thus, grounded on legitimacy and stakeholder theory, this study analyses the views management teams in large listed companies have on communication of CSR. The focus is on aspects on interest, (...)
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  6. Adam Lindgreen, Valérie Swaen & Wesley J. Johnston (2009). Corporate Social Responsibility: An Empirical Investigation of U.S. Organizations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):303 - 323.score: 87.0
    Organizations that believe they should "give something back" to the society have embraced the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR). Although the theoretical underpinnings of CSR have been frequently debated, empirical studies often involve only limited aspects, implying that theory may not be congruent with actual practices and may impede understanding and further development of CSR. The authors investigate actual CSR practices related to five different stakeholder groups, develop an instrument to measure those CSR practices, and apply (...)
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  7. Lutz Preuss & Jack Perschke (2010). Slipstreaming the Larger Boats: Social Responsibility in Medium-Sized Businesses. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (4):531 - 551.score: 87.0
    Studies into corporate social responsibility (CSR) in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) have suggested that small businesses are different to the large companies on which CSR research usually focusses. Extending this argument, this article raises the question what differences in approaches to CSR there are within the SME category. Analysing the CSR strategy and performance of a medium-sized fashion retailer in the United Kingdom through manager interviews as well as customer and employee surveys, the article develops an analytical (...)
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  8. MaryAnn Reynolds & Kristi Yuthas (2008). Moral Discourse and Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):47 - 64.score: 87.0
    This paper examines voluntary corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting as a form of moral discourse. It explores how alternative stakeholder perspectives lead to differing perceptions of the process and content of responsible reporting. We contrast traditional stakeholder theory, which views stakeholders as external parties having a social contract with corporations, with an emerging perspective, which views interaction among corporations and constituents as relational in nature. This moves the stakeholder from an external entity to one that is integral (...)
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  9. Johan J. Graafland, S. C. W. Eijffinger & H. SmidJohan (2004). Benchmarking of Corporate Social Responsibility: Methodological Problems and Robustness. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):137-152.score: 87.0
    This paper investigates the possibilities and problems of benchmarking Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR). After a methodological analysis of the advantages and problems of benchmarking, we develop a benchmark method that includes economic, social and environmental aspects as well as national and international aspects of CSR. The overall benchmark is based on a weighted average of these aspects. The weights are based on the opinions of companies and NGO's. Using different methods of weighting, we find (...)
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  10. Ton van der Wiele, Peter Kok, Richard McKenna & Alan Brown (2001). A Corporate Social Responsibility Audit Within a Quality Management Framework. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (4):285 - 297.score: 87.0
    In this paper a corporate social responsibility audit is developed following the underlying methodology of the quality award/excellence models. Firstly the extent to which the quality awards already incorporate the development of social responsibility is examined by looking at the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and the European Quality Award. It will be shown that the quality awards do not yet include ethical aspects in relation to social responsibility. Both a clear definition of (...)
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  11. Peter Kok, Ton van der Wiele, Richard McKenna & Alan Brown (2001). A Corporate Social Responsibility Audit Within a Quality Management Framework. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (4):285 - 297.score: 87.0
    In this paper a corporate social responsibility audit is developed following the underlying methodology of the quality award/excellence models. Firstly the extent to which the quality awards already incorporate the development of social responsibility is examined by looking at the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award and the European Quality Award. It will be shown that the quality awards do not yet include ethical aspects in relation to social responsibility. Both a clear definition of (...)
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  12. Lois Schafer Mahoney & Linda Thorn (2006). An Examination of the Structure of Executive Compensation and Corporate Social Responsibility: A Canadian Investigation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 69 (2):149 - 162.score: 87.0
    We explore the extent to which Boards use executive compensation to incite firms to act in accordance with social and environmental objectives (e.g., Johnson, R. and D. Greening: 1999, Academy of Management Journal 42(5), 564-578; Kane, E. J.: 2002, Journal of Banking and Finance 26, 1919-1933.). We examine the association between executive compensation and corporate social responsibility (CSR) for 77 Canadian firms using three key components of executives' compensation structure: salary, bonus, and stock options. Similar to prior (...)
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  13. Sun Young Lee & Craig E. Carroll (2011). The Emergence, Variation, and Evolution of Corporate Social Responsibility in the Public Sphere, 1980–2004: The Exposure of Firms to Public Debate. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (1):115-131.score: 87.0
    This study examined the emergence of corporate social responsibility (CSR) as a public issue over 25 years using a content analysis of two national news- papers and seven regional, geographically-dispersed newspapers in the U.S. The present study adopted a comprehensive definition encompassing all four CSR dimensions: economic, ethical, legal, and philanthropic. This study examined newspaper editorials, letters to the editor, op-ed columns, news analyses, and guest columns for three aspects: media attention, media prominence, and media valence. Results (...)
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  14. Jason Q. Zhang, Hong Zhu & Hung-bin Ding (2013). Board Composition and Corporate Social Responsibility: An Empirical Investigation in the Post Sarbanes-Oxley Era. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):381-392.score: 87.0
    Although the composition of the board of directors has important implications for different aspects of firm performance, prior studies tend to focus on financial performance. The effects of board composition on corporate social responsibility (CSR) performance remain an under-researched area, particularly in the period following the enactment of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (SOX). This article specifically examines two important aspects of board composition (i.e., the presence of outside directors and the presence of women directors) and (...)
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  15. Luc Fransen (2013). The Embeddedness of Responsible Business Practice: Exploring the Interaction Between National-Institutional Environments and Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):213-227.score: 87.0
    Academic literature recognizes that firms in different countries deal with corporate social responsibility (CSR) in different ways. Because of this, analysts presume that variations in national-institutional arrangements affect CSR practices. Literature, however, lacks specificity in determining, first, what parts of national political-economic configurations actually affect CSR practices; second, the precise aspects of CSR affected by national-institutional variables; third, how causal mechanisms between national-institutional framework variables and aspects of CSR practices work. Because of this the literature is (...)
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  16. Gail Ridley (2011). National Security as a Corporate Social Responsibility: Critical Infrastructure Resilience. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 103 (1):111-125.score: 87.0
    This article argues for an extension to the scope of corporate social responsibility (CSR) research to include a contemporary issue of importance to national and global security, critical infrastructure resilience. Rather than extending the multiple perspectives on CSR, this study aimed to identify a method of recognising CSR-related issues, before applying it to two dissimilar case studies on critical infrastructure resilience. One case study was of an international telecommunications company based in the US while the other was of (...)
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  17. M. C. Arruda (2009). Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility in Latin American Small and Medium Sized Enterprises: Challenging Development. African Journal of Business Ethics 4 (2):37.score: 87.0
    Considering the lack of substantive scientific or theoretical studies about ethics in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in Latin America, this paper examines the context of an existent paradox, based upon the perspective of experts and academicians of Latin America and the Caribbean. These countries live different realities, due to their respective European cultural influences, as well as to racial and economic issues. Such facts impact the size and characteristics of their industries. On the other hand, the SMEs face (...)
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  18. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten C. A. Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.score: 87.0
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  19. Sugan C. Jain, Dilip Kumar Sen, Muinuddin Khan & Swapan Kumar Bala (2007). An Analytical Study on Social Responsibility Performance Evaluation as an Accounting Measure of Management Efficiency. AI and Society 21 (3):251-266.score: 87.0
    This paper is a portrayal of how social responsibility performance evaluation can act as an accounting measure of management efficiency. In fact, it has given much importance to socio-economic and socio-human obligations to others. The paper attempts to show that these days there is a great need to emphasise more clearly social responsibility, which the corporate sector can and should undertake. The theme of the paper is that the scope of corporate social responsibility encompasses (...)
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  20. Michael S. Aßländer (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility as Subsidiary Co-Responsibility: A Macroeconomic Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (1):115 - 128.score: 87.0
    Recent discussion on Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) mainly focuses on two aspects of CSR: from a technical perspective, CSR aims to improve ethical standards in the organizational decision-making process, and should guarantee that management practices are in accordance with commonly accepted standards of behavior. From a political perspective, CSR describes corporate engagement with ecological and social issues that extend beyond the firm's economic activities. The latter perspective in particular leaves unclear whether such corporate contributions to solve (...)
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  21. Steven M. Flipse, Maarten Ca van der Sanden & Patricia Osseweijer (2013). The Why and How of Enabling the Integration of Social and Ethical Aspects in Research and Development. Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):703-725.score: 87.0
    New and Emerging Science and Technology (NEST) based innovations, e.g. in the field of Life Sciences or Nanotechnology, frequently raise societal and political concerns. To address these concerns NEST researchers are expected to deploy socially responsible R&D practices. This requires researchers to integrate social and ethical aspects (SEAs) in their daily work. Many methods can facilitate such integration. Still, why and how researchers should and could use SEAs remains largely unclear. In this paper we aim to relate motivations (...)
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  22. Saurabh Mishra & Sachin B. Modi (2013). Positive and Negative Corporate Social Responsibility, Financial Leverage, and Idiosyncratic Risk. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):431-448.score: 87.0
    Existing research on the financial implications of corporate social responsibility (CSR) for firms has predominantly focused on positive aspects of CSR, overlooking that firms also undertake actions and initiatives that qualify as negative CSR. Moreover, studies in this area have not investigated how both positive and negative CSR affect the financial risk of firms. As such, in this research, the authors provide a framework linking both positive and negative CSR to idiosyncratic risk of firms. While investigating these (...)
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  23. Tracy Lynn Isaacs (2011). Moral Responsibility in Collective Contexts. Oxford University Press.score: 81.0
    Intentional collective action -- Collective moral responsibility -- Collective guilt -- Individual responsibility for (and in) collective wrongs -- Collective obligation, individual obligation, and individual moral responsibility -- Individual moral responsibility in wrongful social practice.
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  24. Stéphanie Arnaud & David M. Wasieleski (2013). Corporate Humanistic Responsibility: Social Performance Through Managerial Discretion of the HRM. Journal of Business Ethics 120 (3):1-22.score: 78.0
    The Corporate Social Performance (CSP) model (Wood, Acad Manag Rev 164:691–718, 1991) assesses a firm’s social responsibility at three levels of analysis—institutional, organizational and individual—and measures the resulting social outcomes. In this paper, we focus on the individual level of CSP, manifested in the managerial discretion of a firm’s principles, processes, and policies regarding social responsibilities. Specifically, we address the human resources management of employees as a way of promoting CSR values and producing socially minded (...)
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  25. Jennifer Kuzma & Aliya Kuzhabekova (2011). Corporate Social Responsibility for Nanotechnology Oversight. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (4):407-419.score: 77.0
    Growing public concern and uncertainties surrounding emerging technologies suggest the need for socially-responsible behavior of companies in the development and implementation of oversight systems for them. In this paper, we argue that corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an important aspect of nanotechnology oversight given the role of trust in shaping public attitudes about nanotechnology and the lack of data about the health and environmental risks of nanoproducts. We argue that CSR is strengthened by the adoption of stakeholder-driven models (...)
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  26. Cedric Dawkins (2010). Beyond Wages and Working Conditions: A Conceptualization of Labor Union Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):129 - 143.score: 76.0
    This article integrates theory and concepts from the business and society, business ethics, and labor relations literatures to offer a conceptualization of labor union social responsibility that includes activities geared toward three primary objectives: economic equity, workplace democracy, and social justice. Economic, workplace, and social labor union stakeholders are identified, likely issues are highlighted, and the implications of labor union social responsibility for labor union strategy are discussed. It is noted that, given the breadth (...)
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  27. Avshalom Madhala Adam & Tal Shavit (2008). How Can a Ratings-Based Method for Assessing Corporate Social Responsibility (Csr) Provide an Incentive to Firms Excluded From Socially Responsible Investment Indices to Invest in Csr? Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):899 - 905.score: 76.0
    Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) indices play a major role in the stock markets. A connection between doing good and doing well in business is implied. Leading indices, such as the Domini Social Index and others, exemplify the movement toward investing in socially responsible corporations. However, the question remains: Does the ratings-based methodology for assessing corporate social responsibility (CSR) provide an incentive to firms excluded from SRI indices to invest in CSR? Not in its current format. The ratings-based (...)
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  28. Antonio Argandoña, Carlos M. Moreno & Joan M. Solà (2009). Corporate Social Responsibility in the First Years of Caja de Pensiones Para la Vejez y de Ahorros. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):333 - 346.score: 76.0
    When Caja de Pensiones para la Vejez y de Ahorros, "la Caixa," was created in 1905, it was not only the transient response to a serious social, political, and economical problem, but also provided a permanent solution by creating a long-lasting social welfare institution. In addition, its founder understood the responsibility of social welfare institutions not as an isolated responsibility for each institution, but as part of a harmonious whole that is a real moral entity (...)
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  29. Antonio Argandoña, Carlos M. Moreno & Joan M. Solà (2009). Social Responsibility and Social Security: The Foundation of Caja de Pensiones Para la Vejez y de Ahorros. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):319 - 332.score: 76.0
    The concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is not new. Many entrepreneurs created and developed companies along the time, with a strong sense of ethical and social responsibility. This article presents an example of how CSR was conceived and put into practice when Caja de Pensiones para la Vejez y de Ahorros was created in Barcelona in 1905, following the life and ideas of its founder, Francesc Moragas, a lawyer with a deep commitment for social (...)
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  30. Katinka C. Cranenburgh, Kellie Liket & Nigel Roome (2013). Management Responses to Social Activism in an Era of Corporate Responsibility: A Case Study. Journal of Business Ethics 118 (3):497-513.score: 76.0
    Social activism against companies has evolved in the 50 years since Rachel Carson first put the US chemical industry under pressure to halt the indiscriminate use of the chemical DDT. Many more companies have come under the spotlight of activist attention as the agenda social activists address has expanded, provoked in part by the internationalization of business. During the past fifteen years, companies have begun to formulate corporate responsibility (CR) policies and appointed management teams dedicated to CR, (...)
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  31. Omer Farooq, Marielle Payaud, Dwight Merunka & Pierre Valette-Florence (2013). The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Organizational Commitment: Exploring Multiple Mediation Mechanisms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.score: 76.0
    Unlike previous studies that examine the direct effect of employees’ perceived corporate social responsibility (CSR) on affective organizational commitment (AOC), this article examines a mediated link through organizational trust and organizational identification. Social exchange and social identity theory provide the foundation for predictions that the primary outcomes of CSR initiatives are organizational trust and organizational identification, which in turn affect AOC. The test of the research model relies on data collected from 378 employees of local and (...)
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  32. Elisabet Garriga & Domènec Melé (2004). Corporate Social Responsibility Theories: Mapping the Territory. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):51-71.score: 72.0
    The Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) field presents not only a landscape of theories but also a proliferation of approaches, which are controversial, complex and unclear. This article tries to clarify the situation, mapping the territory by classifying the main CSR theories and related approaches in four groups: (1) instrumental theories, in which the corporation is seen as only an instrument for wealth creation, and its social activities are only a means to achieve economic results; (2) political theories, (...)
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  33. Duygu Turker (2009). How Corporate Social Responsibility Influences Organizational Commitment. Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):189 - 204.score: 72.0
    A growing number of studies have investigated the various dimensions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the literature. However, relatively few studies have considered its impacts on employees. The purpose of this study is to analyze how CSR affects the organizational commitment of employees based on the social identity theory (SIT). The proposed model was tested on a sample of 269 business professionals working in Turkey. The findings of the study revealed that CSR to social and (...)
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  34. Ali M. Quazi & Dennis O'Brien (2000). An Empirical Test of a Cross-National Model of Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 25 (1):33 - 51.score: 72.0
    Most models of corporate social responsibility revolve around the controversy as to whether business is a single dimensional entity of profit maximization or a multi-dimensional entity serving greater societal interests. Furthermore, the models are mostly descriptive in nature and are based on the experiences of western countries. There has been little attempt to develop a model that accounts for corporate social responsibility in diverse environments with differing socio-cultural and market settings. In this paper an attempt has (...)
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  35. Bert Scholtens (2009). Corporate Social Responsibility in the International Banking Industry. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):159 - 175.score: 72.0
    This article aims at providing a framework to assess corporate social responsibility with international banks. Currently, it is mainly rating institutions like EIRIS and KLD that provide information about firms’ social conduct and performance. However, this is costly information and it is not clear how the rating institutions arrive at their conclusion. We develop a framework to assess the social responsibility of internationally operating banks. We apply this framework to more than 30 institutions and find (...)
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  36. Dima Jamali & Ramez Mirshak (2007). Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR): Theory and Practice in a Developing Country Context. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (3):243 - 262.score: 72.0
    After providing an overview of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) research in different contexts, and noting the varied methodologies adopted, two robust CSR conceptualizations – one by Carroll (1979, ‘A Three-Dimensional Conceptual Model of Corporate Performance’, The Academy of Management Review 4(4), 497–505) and the other by Wood (1991, ‘Corporate Social Performance Revisited’, The Academy of Management Review 16(4), 691–717) – have been adopted for this research and their integration explored. Using this newly synthesized framework, the research critically (...)
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  37. Dima Jamali (2008). A Stakeholder Approach to Corporate Social Responsibility: A Fresh Perspective Into Theory and Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):213 - 231.score: 72.0
    Stakeholder theory has gained currency in the business and society literature in recent years in light␣of its practicality from the perspective of managers and scholars. In accounting for the recent ascendancy of␣stakeholder theory, this article presents an overview of␣two traditional conceptualizations of corporate socialresponsibility (CSR) (Carroll: 1979, ‹A Three-Dimensional Conceptual Model of Corporate Performance', The Academy of Management Review 4(4), 497–505 and Wood: 1991, ‹Corporate Social Performance Revisited', The Academy of Management Review 16(4), 691–717), highlighting their predominant (...)
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  38. Michael J. Maloni & Michael E. Brown (2006). Corporate Social Responsibility in the Supply Chain: An Application in the Food Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (1):35 - 52.score: 72.0
    The food industry faces many significant risks from public criticism of corporate social responsibility (CSR) issues in the supply chain. This paper draws upon previous research and emerging industry trends to develop a comprehensive framework of supply chain CSR in the industry. The framework details unique CSR applications in the food supply chain including animal welfare, biotechnology, environment, fair trade, health and safety, and labor and human rights. General supply chain CSR issues such as community and procurement are (...)
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  39. Duygu Turker (2009). Measuring Corporate Social Responsibility: A Scale Development Study. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (4):411 - 427.score: 72.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is one of the most prominent concepts in the literature and, in short, indicates the positive impacts of businesses on their stakeholders. Despite the growing body of literature on this concept, the measurement of CSR is still problematic. Although the literature provides several methods for measuring corporate social activities, almost all of them have some limitations. The purpose of this study is to provide an original, valid, and reliable measure of CSR reflecting the (...)
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  40. Supriti Mishra & Damodar Suar (2010). Does Corporate Social Responsibility Influence Firm Performance of Indian Companies? Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):571 - 601.score: 72.0
    This study examines whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) towards primary stakeholders influences the financial and the non-financial performance (NFP) of Indian firms. Perceptual data on CSR and NFP were collected from 150 senior-level Indian managers including CEOs through questionnaire survey.Hard data on financial performance (FP) of the companies were obtained from secondary sources. A questionnaire for assessing CSR was developed with respect to six stakeholder groups - employees, customers, investors, community, natural environment, and suppliers. A composite measure of (...)
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  41. Sean Valentine & Gary Fleischman (2008). Professional Ethical Standards, Corporate Social Responsibility, and the Perceived Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (3):657 - 666.score: 72.0
    This study explored several proposed relationships among professional ethical standards, corporate social responsibility, and the perceived role of ethics and social responsibility. Data were collected from 313 business managers registered with a large professional research association with a mailed self-report questionnaire. Mediated regression analysis indicated that perceptions of corporate social responsibility partially mediated the positive relationship between perceived professional ethical standards and the believed importance of ethics and social responsibility. Perceptions of corporate (...)
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  42. Paul Kapelus (2002). Mining, Corporate Social Responsibility and the "Community": The Case of Rio Tinto, Richards Bay Minerals and the Mbonambi. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 39 (3):275 - 296.score: 72.0
    Mining companies have long had a questionable reputation for social responsibility, especially in developing countries. In recent years, mining companies operating in developing countries have come under increased pressure as opponents have placed them under greater public scrutiny. Mining companies have responded by developing global corporate social responsibility strategies as part of their larger global business strategies. In these strategies, a prominent place is given to their relationship with local communities. For business ethics, one basic issue (...)
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  43. Brian P. Schaefer (2008). Shareholders and Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):297 - 312.score: 72.0
    The article presents an analysis and critique of Milton Friedman’s argument that the social responsibility of business is merely to increase its profits. The analysis uncovers a central claim that Friedman implies, but does not explicitly defend, namely that the shareholders of a corporation have no duty to direct that corporation’s management to exercise social responsibility. An argument against this claim is then advanced by way of a convergence strategy, whereby multiple influential moral approaches are shown (...)
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  44. Hela Sheth & Kathy M. Babiak (2010). Beyond the Game: Perceptions and Practices of Corporate Social Responsibility in the Professional Sport Industry. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 91 (3):433 - 450.score: 72.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an area of great interest, yet little is known about how CSR is perceived and practiced in the professional sport industry. This study employs a mixed-methods approach, including a survey, and a qualitative content analysis of responses to open-ended questions, to explore how professional sport executives define CSR, and what priorities teams have regarding their CSR activities. Findings from this study indicate that sport executives placed different emphases on elements of CSR including a (...)
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  45. C. B. Bhattacharya, Daniel Korschun & Sankar Sen (2009). Strengthening Stakeholder–Company Relationships Through Mutually Beneficial Corporate Social Responsibility Initiatives. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):257 - 272.score: 72.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) continues to gain attention atop the corporate agenda and is by now an important component of the dialogue between companies and their stakeholders. Nevertheless, there is still little guidance as to how companies can implement CSR activity in order to maximize returns to CSR investment. Theorists have identified many company-favoring outcomes of CSR; yet there is a dearth of research on the psychological mechanisms that drive stakeholder responses to CSR activity. Borrowing from the literatures (...)
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  46. Adaeze Okoye (2009). Theorising Corporate Social Responsibility as an Essentially Contested Concept: Is a Definition Necessary? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):613 - 627.score: 72.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become indispensable in modern business discourse; yet identifying and defining what CSR means is open to contest. Although such contestation is not uncommon with concepts found in the social sciences, for CSR it presents some difficulty for theoretical and empirical analysis, especially with regards to verifying that diverse application of the concept is consistent or concomitant. On the other hand, it seems unfeasible that the diversity of issues addressed under the CSR umbrella (...)
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  47. Carmelo Reverte (2009). Determinants of Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosure Ratings by Spanish Listed Firms. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):351 - 366.score: 72.0
    The aim of this paper is to analyze whether a number of firm and industry characteristics, as well as media exposure, are potential determinants of corporate social responsibility (CSR) disclosure practices by Spanish listed firms. Empirical studies have shown that CSR disclosure activism varies across companies, industries, and time (Gray et al., Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal 8(2), 47–77, 1995; Journal of Business Finance & Accounting 28(3/4), 327–356, 2001; Hackston and Milne, Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal 9(1), 77–108, (...)
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  48. Laura Albareda, Josep M. Lozano & Tamyko Ysa (2007). Public Policies on Corporate Social Responsibility: The Role of Governments in Europe. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 74 (4):391 - 407.score: 72.0
    Over the last decade, Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has been defined first as a concept whereby companies decide voluntarily to contribute to a better society and cleaner environment and, second, as a process by which companies manage their relationship␣with stakeholders (European Commission, 2001. Nowadays, CSR has become a priority issue on governments’ agendas. This has changed governments’ capacity to act and impact on social and environmental issues in their relationship with companies, but has also affected the framework (...)
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  49. David S. Gelb & Joyce A. Strawser (2001). Corporate Social Responsibility and Financial Disclosures: An Alternative Explanation for Increased Disclosure. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 33 (1):1 - 13.score: 72.0
    Researchers and practitioners have devoted considerable attention to firms'' policies regarding discretionary disclosures. Prior studies argue that firms increase demand for their debt and equity issues and, thus, lower their cost of capital, by providing more informative disclosures. However, empirical research has generally not been able to document significant benefits from increased disclosure.This paper proposes an alternative explanation – firms disclose because it is the socially responsible thing to do. We argue that companies have incentives to engage in stakeholder management (...)
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  50. Thomas Hanke & Wolfgang Stark (2009). Strategy Development: Conceptual Framework on Corporate Social Responsibility. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):507 - 516.score: 72.0
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) and its action-oriented offspring Corporate Citizenship (CC) currently trigger an intensifying debate on ethics, role and behavior of companies within civil society. For companies, CSR raises the question of what may be the "good reason(s)" for acting responsible towards its members, customers or society. In order to answer this question, we face the debate on CSR and its strategic engagement drivers on the levels of corporate culture, social innovation, and civil society. In this (...)
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