Search results for 'Restorative justice' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David J. Cornwell (2006). Criminal Punishment and Restorative Justice: Past, Present, and Future Perspectives. North American Distributor, International Specialised Book Services.score: 180.0
    Provides an international perspective as to the potential of restorative justice to * Deliver better ways of dealing with offenders and victims * Reduce the use ...
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  2. Jeffrey Blustein (2010). Forgiveness, Commemoration, and Restorative Justice: The Role of Moral Emotions. Metaphilosophy 41 (4):582-617.score: 180.0
    Abstract: Forgiveness of wrongdoing in response to public apology and amends making seems, on the face of it, to leave little room for the continued commemoration of wrongdoing. This rests on a misunderstanding of forgiveness, however, and we can explain why there need be no incompatibility between them. To do this, I emphasize the role of what I call nonangry negative moral emotions in constituting memories of wrongdoing. Memories so constituted can persist after forgiveness and have important moral functions, and (...)
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  3. Wesley Cragg (1992). The Practice of Punishment: Towards a Theory of Restorative Justice. Routledge.score: 180.0
    In the latter half of the twentieth century, there has been a sharp decline in confidence in sentencing principles, due to a questioning of the efficacy of punishment. It has been very difficult to develop consistent, fair, and humane criteria for evaluating legislative, judicial and correctional advancements. The Practice of Punishment offers a comprehensive study of punishment that identifies the principles of sentencing and corrections on which modern correctional systems should be built. The theory of punishment that emerges is built (...)
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  4. Jakob Holderstein Holtermann (2009). Outlining the Shadow of the Axe—On Restorative Justice and the Use of Trial and Punishment. Criminal Law and Philosophy 3 (2):187-207.score: 180.0
    Most proponents of restorative justice admit to the need to find a well defined place for the use of traditional trial and punishment alongside restorative justice processes. Concrete answers have, however, been wanting more often than not. John Braithwaite is arguably the one who has come the closest, and here I systematically reconstruct and critically discuss the rules or principles suggested by him for referring cases back and forth between restorative justice and traditional trial (...)
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  5. Tyrone Kirchengast (2010). Proportionality in Sentencing and the Restorative Justice Paradigm: 'Just Deserts' for Victims and Defendants Alike? [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (2):197-213.score: 180.0
    The doctrine of proportionality seeks to limit arbitrary and capricious punishment in order to ensure that offenders are punished according to their ‘just desert’. In Australian sentencing law, proportionality goes some way toward achieving this ‘balanced’ approach by requiring a court to consider various and often competing interests in formulating a sentence commensurate with offence seriousness and offender culpability. Modification of sentencing law by the introduction of victim impact statements or the requirement that sentencing courts take explicit account of the (...)
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  6. V. C. Geeraets (forthcoming). Fictions of Restorative Justice, Vincent Geeraets. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-17.score: 180.0
    In this paper, I argue that scholars such as John Braithwaite and Lode Walgrave rely on fictions when presenting their utopian vision of restorative justice. Three claims in particular are shown to be fictitious. Proponents of restorative justice maintain, first, that the offender and the victim voluntarily attend the restorative conference. Second, that the restorative conference enables the offender and the victim to take on active responsibility. Third, that the reparatory tasks on which the (...)
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  7. Annabelle Mooney (2012). Restoring Trust: Plachimada, the Human Trust and Anticipatory Negligence as Restorative Justice. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 27 (2):1-19.score: 180.0
    This paper argues for proleptic restorative justice in the area of the environment in the form of a ‘human trust’. Drawing inspiration from the Roman public trust, the human trust insists that some ‘goods’ are so important that they can neither be owned nor spoiled; rather, they must be protected. In order to explain this model, water rights will be used as an example, specifically, the case of Plachimada’s battle with Coca-Cola over the use of local ground water (...)
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  8. Gerry Johnstone (2002). Restorative Justice: Ideas, Values, Debates. Willan Pub..score: 180.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1 Introduction 1 -- 2 Central themes and critical issues 10 -- Introduction 10 -- Core themes 11 -- Differences which have surfaced in the move from -- margins to mainstream 15 -- The claims of restorative justice: a brief examination 21 -- Some limitations of restorative justice 25 -- Some dangers of restorative justice 29 -- Debunking restorative justice 32 -- 3 Reviving restorative justice traditions (...)
     
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  9. Raffaele Rodogno (2008). Shame and Guilt in Restorative Justice. Psychology, Public Policy, and Law 14 (2):142-176.score: 180.0
    In this article, I examine the relevance and desirability of shame and guilt to restorative justice conferences. I argue that a careful study of the psychology of shame and guilt reveals that both emotions possess traits that can be desirable and traits that can be undesirable for restoration. More in particular, having presented the aims of restorative justice, the importance of face-to-face conferences in reaching these aims, the emotional dynamics that take place within such conferences, and (...)
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  10. Charles K. B. Barton (2003). Restorative Justice: The Empowerment Model. Hawkins Press.score: 150.0
    There will also be two sample role plays in the book and additionally there will be four complete role plays available on our website, closer to publication ...
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  11. David J. Cornwell (2009). The Penal Crisis and the Clapham Omnibus: Questions and Answers in Restorative Justice. North American Distributor, International Specialised Book Services.score: 150.0
    Designed for a wide readership, this book looks at the proble.
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  12. Martin Wright (1996). Justice for Victims and Offenders: A Restorative Response to Crime. Waterside Press.score: 138.0
    Martin Wrights original ground-breaking and influential analysis of the defects of the adversarial system of justice, plus the arguments in favour of a more ...
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  13. Hilary Cremin, Edward Sellman & Gillean McCluskey (2012). Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Restorative Justice: Developing Insights for Education. British Journal of Educational Studies 60 (4):421 - 437.score: 120.0
    This article takes restorative justice as an example of an initiative that crosses disciplinary boundaries, and that has been usefully applied within educational contexts. Grounded in criminology, restorative justice also has roots in psychology, education, sociology, peace studies, philosophy and law. The article draws on an ESRC funded seminar series which investigated interdisciplinary perspectives on restorative justice and their applicability to education. The series found that the ways in which restorative justice is (...)
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  14. Francis J. Schweigert (1999). Learning the Common Good: Principles of Community-Based Moral Education in Restorative Justice. Journal of Moral Education 28 (2):163-183.score: 120.0
    This study investigates the educative process in restorative justice reforms, revealing three characteristics effective in facilitating moral learning for the common good. These three characteristics can be formulated as principles to guide the theory and practice of communitybased moral education. First, restorative justice brings the moral authority in personal communal traditions and the moral authority in impersonal universal norms together in a mutually reinforcing combination. Secondly, restorative justice processes focus on the "space between places" (...)
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  15. Hennessey Hayes (2007). Reoffending and Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice. 426--444.score: 120.0
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  16. Linda Radzik (2007). Offenders, the Making of Amends and the State. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice. 192--207.score: 120.0
    This essay asks whether restorative justice practices in criminal legal systems are consistent with the aims of a liberal state.
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  17. Margarita Zernova & Martin Wright (2007). Alternative Visions of Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice. 91--108.score: 120.0
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  18. Gordon Bazemore & Lori Elis (2007). Evaluation of Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice. 397--425.score: 120.0
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  19. Nadine F. Bowers du Toit & Grace Nkomo (2014). The Ongoing Challenge of Restorative Justice in South Africa: How and Why Wealthy Suburban Congregations Are Responding to Poverty and Inequality. Hts Theological Studies 70 (2):01-08.score: 120.0
    South Africa remains one of the most unequal societies in the world and any discussion around poverty and the church's response cannot exclude this reality. This article attempts to analyse the response of wealthy, 'majority white' suburban congregations in the southern suburbs of Cape Town to issues of poverty and inequality. This is attempted through the lense of restorative justice, which is broadly explored and defined through a threefold perspective of reconciliation, reparations and restitution. The first part explores (...)
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  20. Cbn Gade (2013). Restorative Justice and the South African Truth and Reconciliation Process. South African Journal of Philosophy 32 (1):10-35.score: 120.0
    It has frequently been argued that the post-apartheid Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) was committed to restorative justice (RJ), and that RJ has deep historical roots in African indigenous cultures by virtue of its congruence both with ubuntu and with African indigenous justice systems (AIJS). In this article, I look into the question of what RJ is. I also present the finding that the term ‘restorative justice’ appears only in transcripts of three public TRC hearings, (...)
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  21. Jack B. Hamlin (2014). The Semiotics of Restorative Justice: The Healing Garden Nurtured From the Well-Spring of Signs, Symbols and Language. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 27 (2):217-221.score: 120.0
    While writing the foreword for this special edition of the International Journal for the Semiotics of Law, I was informed of Dr. Nelson R. Mandela’s death. While saddened with his passing, I was struck by the fact, he was one of the two men who most influenced my study and practice of Restorative Justice; the other was my father. Both passed away while this edition was compiled and edited.In the mid 1990s, I first read about Restorative (...) as an aspect of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (“TRC”) established by Dr. Mandela in post-apartheid South Africa. I was fascinated by his forgiveness of his oppressors and how he infused the ideals of reconciliation and forgiveness into a court-like hearing. It was an opportunity for the victim of human rights violations to face the perpetrator and tell the perpetrator the extent of the injuries he or she suffered. After the victim spoke, the perpetrator had an opportunity to admit to the wrongdoing, take full responsibility for the har. (shrink)
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  22. Ari Kohen (2009). The Personal and the Political: Forgiveness and Reconciliation in Restorative Justice. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 12 (3):399-423.score: 120.0
    At the center of this paper are three questions: in the absence of a religious worldview, can one gain access to the concepts of forgiveness and reconciliation, can reconciliation be achieved in the absence of forgiveness or does the former depend in some way upon the latter, and can we make sense of a restorative approach to justice in the absence of either forgiveness or reconciliation? To answer these questions, I look closely at the concept of forgiveness in (...)
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  23. Jennifer Llewellyn (2007). Truth Commissions and Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice. 351--371.score: 120.0
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  24. D. Van Ness (2007). Prisons and Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice.score: 120.0
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  25. Kathleen Daly & Julie Stubbs (2007). Feminist Theory, Feminist and Anti-Racist Politics, and Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice. 149--170.score: 120.0
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  26. Simon Green (2007). The Victim's Movement and Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice. 171--191.score: 120.0
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  27. Jack B. Hamlin & Akira Hokamura (2012). The Cultural Context of Restorative Justice: Journeys Through Our Cultural Forests to a Well-Spring of Healing. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 27 (2):1-20.score: 120.0
    In the field of Conflict Transformation, Restorative Justice (RJ) is often perceived as a transformative process focused on healing relationships after a specific harm. The parties considered in a RJ setting are those harmed, those responsible and the community impacted. This is particularly true in the field of criminal and transitional justice, and in an extended and spiritual view, there is reconciliation with the parties and God. Despite cultural differences, RJ theory and concepts have been accepted favorably (...)
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  28. H. Hayes (2007). Restorative Justice and Re-Offending. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice.score: 120.0
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  29. Carolyn Hoyle (2007). Policing and Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice. 292--311.score: 120.0
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  30. Gerry Johnstone (2007). Critical Perspectives on Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice. 598--614.score: 120.0
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  31. Gerry Johnstone & DanielW Van Ness (2007). Evaluation and Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice.score: 120.0
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  32. Gerry Johnstone & DanielW Van Ness (2007). Restorative Justice in Social Context. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice.score: 120.0
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  33. Gerry Johnstone & DanielW Van Ness (2007). Roots of Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice.score: 120.0
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  34. Gerry Johnstone & DanielW Van Ness (2007). The Global Appeal of Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice.score: 120.0
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  35. Gerry Johnstone & Daniel Van Ness (2007). The Meaning of Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice.score: 120.0
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  36. Brenda Morrison (2007). Schools and Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice. 325--350.score: 120.0
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  37. George Pavlich (2007). Ethics, Universal Principles and Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice.score: 120.0
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  38. Declan Roche (2007). Retribution and Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice. 75--90.score: 120.0
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  39. A. Skelton & M. Sekhonyane (2007). Human Rights and Restorative Justice. In Gerry Johnstone & Daniel W. van Ness (eds.), Handbook of Restorative Justice. 580--597.score: 120.0
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  40. Kim Sang Ong-Van-Cung (2010). Subject in Politics and Justice. Eidos 13:10-25.score: 108.0
    Normal 0 21 false false false ES-CO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 In this paper we study the Kantian conception of punishment in the Metaphysics of Morals. We look at Foucault’s reformulation of the right to punish which is mostly a critique of the kantian conception. Then we introduce the conception of restorative justice grounded on the social ideal of recognition, which corrects certain aspects of the Kantian conception, but gives to justice its status of an institution rather than (...)
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  41. Kris Vanspauwen & Tyrone Savage (2008). Restorative Justice and Truth-Seeking in the DR Congo: Much Closing for Peace, Little Opening for Justice. In Ivo Aertsen (ed.), Restoring Justice After Large-Scale Violent Conflicts: Kosovo, Dr Congo and the Israeli-Palestinian Case. Willan. 392--410.score: 104.0
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  42. Ivo Aertsen (ed.) (2008). Restoring Justice After Large-Scale Violent Conflicts: Kosovo, Dr Congo and the Israeli-Palestinian Case. Willan.score: 102.0
    The Kosovo conflict -- The Israeli-Palestinian conflict -- The conflict in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
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  43. Kimberley Brownlee (2010). Retributive, Restorative and Ritualistic Justice. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (2):385-397.score: 102.0
    Few defences of retribution in criminal justice make a plausible case for the view that punishment plays a necessary role in restoring relations between offenders, victims and the community. Even fewer defences of retribution make a plausible appeal to the interpersonal practice of apologizing as a symbolically adequate model for criminal justice. This review article considers Christopher Bennett’s engaging defence of an apology ritual in criminal justice, an account of justifiable punishment that draws from the best of (...)
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  44. Albert W. Dzur & Alan Wertheimer (2002). Forgiveness and Public Deliberation: The Practice of Restorative Justice. Criminal Justice Ethics 21 (1):3-20.score: 96.0
  45. Nick Smith (2010). Kantian Restorative Justice? Criminal Justice Ethics 29 (1):54-69.score: 96.0
  46. Howard Zehr (2009). The Intersection of Restorative Justice with Trauma Healing, Conflict Transformation and Peacebuilding. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 18 (1/2):20-30.score: 96.0
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  47. Laura Mirsky (2009). Restorative Justice Practices of Native American Practitioners of the Southwestern United States. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 18 (1/2):95-107.score: 96.0
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  48. Christopher Bennett (2008). The Apology Ritual: A Philosophical Theory of Punishment. Cambridge University Press.score: 90.0
    Christopher Bennett presents a theory of punishment grounded in the practice of apology, and in particular in reactions such as feeling sorry and making amends. He argues that offenders have a 'right to be punished' - that it is part of taking an offender seriously as a member of a normatively demanding relationship (such as friendship or collegiality or citizenship) that she is subject to retributive attitudes when she violates the demands of that relationship. However, while he claims that punishment (...)
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  49. Margaret Urban Walker (2006). Restorative Justice and Reparations. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (3):377–395.score: 90.0
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  50. Lucy Allais (2012). Restorative Justice, Retributive Justice, and the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Philosophy and Public Affairs 39 (4):331-363.score: 90.0
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