Search results for 'Revelation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  46
    Eli Shupe (forthcoming). Transformative Experience and the Limits of Revelation. Philosophical Studies:1-14.
    In her recent book, L. A. Paul presses a serious problem for normative decision theory. Normative decision theory seems to be inapplicable when the values of potential outcomes are unknown, or when our preferences may change as a result of our choice. Paul then offers a framework for overcoming these problems, known as the revelation approach. I argue that, contrary to what Paul suggests, this approach is unhelpful in the large class of cases where the decision at hand centrally (...)
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  2. Taede A. Smedes (2014). Emil Brunner Revisited: On the Cognitive Science of Religion, the Imago Dei, and Revelation. Zygon 49 (1):190-207.
    This article aims at a constructive and argumentative engagement between the cognitive science of religion (CSR) and philosophical and theological reflection on the imago Dei. The Swiss theologian Emil Brunner argued that the theological notion that humans were created in the image of God entails that there is a “point of contact” for revelation to occur. This article argues that Brunner's notion resonates quite strongly with the findings of the CSR. The first part will give a short overview (...)
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  3. Keith Allen (2011). Revelation and the Nature of Colour. Dialectica 65 (2):153-176.
    According to naïve realist (or primitivist) theories of colour, colours are sui generis mind-independent properties. The question that I consider in this paper is the relationship of naïve realism to what Mark Johnston calls Revelation, the thesis that the essential nature of colour is fully revealed in a standard visual experience. In the first part of the paper, I argue that if naïve realism is true, then Revelation is false. In the second part of the paper, I defend (...)
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  4.  31
    Christopher Bobier (2014). Anti-Luck Virtue Epistemology and Divine Revelation. Philosophia 42 (2):309-320.
    Anti-Luck Virtue Epistemology (ALVE) states that for S to have knowledge, S must have a virtuously formed safe true belief. S’s belief that p is safe if, in most near-by possible worlds where S’s belief is formed in the same manner as in the actual world, S’s belief is true. S’s safe belief that p is virtuously formed if S’s safe belief is formed using reliable and well-integrated cognitive processes and it is to S’s credit that she formed the belief. (...)
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  5.  4
    Alexandre Guilherme (2015). Reflexions on Buber’s ‘Living-Centre’: Conceiving of the Teacher as ‘The Builder’ and Teaching as a ‘Situational Revelation’. Studies in Philosophy and Education 34 (3):245-262.
    There has been a shift from teaching to learning, the so-called process of ‘learnification’, which promotes the idea that teaching should be primarily concerned with the creation of rich learning environments and scaffolding student learning. In doing so, this process of ‘learnification’ has also attacked the idea that teachers have something to teach and that students have something to learn from their teachers. The influence of constructivism, and thinkers like Piaget, Vygotsky, and Bruner in this paradigm shift is quite evident; (...)
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  6.  34
    Franck Lihoreau (2014). Revelation and The Essentiality of Essence. Symposion 1 (1):69-75.
    It is usually agreed that the Revelation Thesis about experience – the idea that the knowledge we gain by having an experience somehow “reveals” the essence, or nature, of this experience – only requires that we know the essence of the experience, not that we know, of this essence, that it is the essence of the experience. I contest this agreement. In the light of what I call the “Essentiality of Essence Principle”– the principle (...)
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  7.  9
    Norbert Max Samuelson (2002). Revelation and the God of Israel. Cambridge University Press.
    Revelation and the God of Israel explores the concept of revelation as it emerges from the Hebrew Scriptures and is interpreted in Jewish philosophy and theology. The first part is a study in intellectual history that attempts to answer the question, what is the best possible understanding of revelation. The second part is a study in constructive theology and attempts to answer the question, is it reasonable to affirm belief in revelation. Here Norbert M. Samuelson focuses (...)
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  8.  50
    Phil Enns (2007). Reason and Revelation: Kant and the Problem of Authority. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (2):103 - 114.
    This paper explores the significance of authority for Kant’s understanding of the relationship between reason and revelation. Beginning with the separation of the faculties of Theology and Philosophy in Conflict, it will be shown that Kant sees a clear distinction between the authority of reason and that of revelation. However, when one turns to Religion, it is also clear that Kant sees an important, perhaps necessary, relationship between the two. Drawing on a variety of texts, in particular those (...)
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  9.  25
    Paul Clavier (2013). No Creation, No Revelation. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (3):255-268.
    There is a strong claim that the world’s createdness, if true, cannot be known but through revelation. In this paper we try to dismiss this claim by arguing that creation cannot be merely a revealed truth (revelabile tantum), since it is on the contrary the very preamble to any genuine revelation. Ontologically, no revelation can happen in a self-existent world. No creation, no revelation. Epistemically, no revelation is to be admitted but on the assumption that (...)
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  10. Amir Dastmalchian (2008). Swinburne’s View of the Islamic Revelation. Journal of Shi‘a Islamic Studies 1 (4):95-106.
    Swinburne gives reasons for a religious enquirer to disregard the Islamic revelation and to accept the exclusive superiority of the Christian revelation. This essay attempts to explain Swinburne’s reasoning. An attempt is also made to explain what the Islamic revelation is. I argue that on Swinburne’s own account, the Islamic revelation should not be sidelined in favour of the Christian revelation.
     
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  11.  6
    Thomas Park (2015). Faith in God Without Any Revelation? International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 78 (3):315-328.
    In this paper I introduce John D. Caputo’s view of the divine and argue against his claim that we can preserve faith in God while dropping the idea of divine revelation. Despite Caputo’s apophatic point of view, he makes two claims with regard to God, or ’the divine’. First, he claims that we all have a divine call for justice and compassion in us. Secondly, he claims that God’s kingdom comes true if we make it happen and that this (...)
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  12.  64
    Domenic Marbaniang (2009). Theology of Revelation in the Bible and the Writings of 19th and 20th Century Theologians. Google Books.
    This book gives an introduction to the various theological perspectives regarding revelation. It includes a survey of the views of liberal, evangelical, Calvinist, and Charismatic theologians. The author presents his succinct view in the last chapter.
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  13. Michael L. Morgan (1992). Dilemmas in Modern Jewish Thought the Dialectics of Revelation and History. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    "MIchael Morgan has served up an intellectual treat. These subtle and carefully reasoned essays explore the dilemmas of the post-modern Jew who would take history seriously without losing the commanding presence Israel heard at Sinai.... It is a pleasure to be nourished by a fresh mind exploring the tension between reason and revelation, history and faith."—Rabbi Samuel Karff "This is without doubt one of the most significant works in modern Jewish thought and a must for a thoughtful student of (...)
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  14.  12
    Matthew Frise (2016). Review of William J. Wainwright, Reason, Revelation, and Devotion: Inference and Argument in Religion. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  15.  8
    Karl Jaspers (1967). Philosophical Faith and Revelation. London, Collins.
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  16. K. Satchidananda Murty (1959). Revelation and Reason in Advaita Vedānta. New York, Columbia University Press.
     
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  17.  3
    Ives Radrizzani (2006). Le concours de la révélation intérieure et de la révélation extérieure chez le premier Fichte,ou le christianisme comme béquille au théisme de la Doctrine de la Science. Archives de Philosophie 2 (2):203-216.
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  18.  3
    Christian Maurer (2016). Archibald Campbell and the Committee for Purity of Doctrine on Natural Reason, Natural Religion, and Revelation. History of European Ideas 42 (2):256-275.
    This article discusses Archibald Campbell’s (1691-1756) early writings on religion, and the reactions they provoked from conservative orthodox Presbyterians. Purportedly against the Deist Matthew Tindal, Campbell crucially argued for two claims, namely (i) for the reality of immutable moral laws of nature, and (ii) for the incapacity of natural reason, or the light of nature, to discover the fundamental truths of religion, in particular the existence and perfections of God, and the immortality of the soul. In an episode that had (...)
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  19. Johann Gottlieb Fichte (1978). Attempt at a Critique of All Revelation. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  20.  1
    Iulia Iuga (2010). Stephane Moses, Sistem si revelatie. Filosofia lui Franz Rosenzweig/ System and revelation. Franz Rosenzweig's Philosophy. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (9):159-161.
    Stephane Moses, Sistem si revelatie. Filosofia lui Franz Rosenzweig Bucuresti, Ed. Hasefer, Colectia Judaica, 2003.
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  21. Matthew A. Bloomer (2001). Judeo-Christian Revelation as a Source of Philosophical Reflection According to Étienne Gilson. Apollinare Studi.
     
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  22. Anthony Bolos (2011). Obstacles to Divine Revelation. [REVIEW] European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (2).
     
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  23.  9
    George J. Brooke, Hindy Najman & Loren T. Stuckenbruck (eds.) (2008). The Significance of Sinai: Traditions About Sinai and Divine Revelation in Judaism and Christianity. Brill.
    the midrash, the advisability of staying at home during this festival is promoted through the dictum, “When you bind your lulav, bind your feet (restrain ...
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  24. A. M. Fairweather (1944). The Word as Truth a Critical Examination of the Christian Doctrine of Revelation in the Writings of Thomas Aquinas and Karl Barth. Lutterworth Press.
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  25. Stéphane Habib (2005). Levinas Et Rosenzweig: Philosophies de la Révélation. Presses Universitaires de France.
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  26. Errol E. Harris (1958). Revelation Through Reason: Religion in the Light of Science and Philosophy. New Haven, Yale University Press.
     
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  27. F. W. Kingston (1928). Ideas and Revelation. W. Heffer & Sons, Ltd.
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  28. Adolph Lichtigfeld (1937). Philosophy and Revelation in the Work of Contemporary Jewish Thinkers. London, M.L. Cailingold.
     
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  29. Frederick Denison Maurice (1859/1975). What is Revelation?: A Series of Sermons on the Epiphany, to Which Are Added Letters to a Student of Theology on the Bampton Lectures of Mr. Mansel. Ams Press.
     
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  30.  2
    Nathaniel Micklem (1953). Reason and Revelation: A Question From Duns Scotus. Nelson.
    Exposition of the first question from the Prologue to the Opus Oxoniense.--Epilogue.--Latin text.
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  31. Petru Moldovan (2010). Moshe Halbertal, Ezoterism si exoterism. Restrictiile misterului in traditia iudaica/ Concealment and Revelation. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (9):171-172.
    Moshe Halbertal, Ezoterism si exoterism. Restrictiile misterului in traditia iudaica Ed. Limes, Cluj-Napoca, 2004, traducere din limba engleza de Roxana Havrici.
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  32. William Beattie Monahan (1935). The Psychology of St. Thomas Aquinas and Divine Revelation. Trinity Press.
     
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  33. Yvonne Sherwood (2014). Beyond the Conflict Between ‘Reason’ and ‘Revelation’. Grotiana 35 (1):95-118.
    _ Source: _Volume 35, Issue 1, pp 95 - 118 In De veritate, sacrifice is appealed to as a universal rite and the ultimate guarantee of immutable truth, beyond reasonable deduction or natural instinct. But sacrifice also stands as the ultimate example of the abrogation and alteration of law. As an example of the abrogation of law, sacrifice signifies in both directions. The case of Abraham demonstrates God’s sovereign power of dispensatio. Divine right to radical revision is demonstrated in the (...)
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  34.  46
    Kelly Trogdon (forthcoming). Revelation and Physicalism. Synthese:1-22.
    According to experiential revelation, phenomenal concepts reveal the nature of the phenomenal properties they refer to. Some see experiential revelation as posing a direct challenge to physicalism. The basic idea is this: given experiential revelation, were phenomenal properties physical/functional in nature they would be presented as such when you think of them under phenomenal concepts, but phenomenal concepts don’t present their referents in this way. I argue that, while this argument on a plausible reconstruction fails, the thesis (...)
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  35.  3
    Richard Swinburne (2009). Revelation: From Metaphor to Analogy (Second Edition). Philosophia Christi 11 (1):249 - 252.
    The great religions often claim that their books or creeds contain truths revealed by God. How could we know that they do? In the second edition of Revelation, renowned philosopher of religion Richard Swinburne addresses this central question. But since the books of great religions often contain much poetry and parable, Swinburne begins by investigating how eternal truth can be conveyed in unfamiliar genres, by analogy and metaphor, within false presuppositions about science and history. In the final part of (...)
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  36.  23
    Obeua S. Persons (2006). The Effects of Fraud and Lawsuit Revelation on U.S. Executive Turnover and Compensation. Journal of Business Ethics 64 (4):405 - 419.
    This study investigates the impact of fraud/lawsuit revelation on U.S. top executive turnover and compensation. It also examines potential explanatory variables affecting the executive turnover and compensation among U.S. fraud/lawsuit firms. Four important findings are documented. First, there was significantly higher executive turnover among U.S. firms with fraud/lawsuit revelation in the Wall Street Journal than matched firms without such revelation. Second, although on average, U.S. top executives received an increase in cash compensation after fraud/lawsuit revelation, this (...)
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  37.  18
    Samuel Moyn (2005). Origins of the Other: Emmanuel Levinas Between Revelation and Ethics. Cornell University Press.
    True Bergsonianism : beginnings of a philosopher -- The controversy over intersubjectivity -- Nazism and crisis : the interruption of a trajectory -- Totaliter aliter : revelation in interwar thought -- Levinas's discovery of the other in the making of French existentialism -- The ethical turn : philosophy and Judaism in the Cold War.
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  38.  14
    Leora Faye Batnitzky (2006). Leo Strauss and Emmanuel Levinas: Philosophy and the Politics of Revelation. Cambridge University Press.
    Leo Strauss and Emmanuel Levinas, two twentieth-century Jewish philosophers and two extremely provocative thinkers whose reputations have grown considerably over the last twenty years, are rarely studied together. This is due to the disparate interests of many of their intellectual heirs. Strauss has influenced political theorists and policy makers on the right while Levinas has been championed in the humanities by different cadres associated with postmodernist thought. In Leo Strauss and Emmanuel Levinas: Philosophy and the Politics of Revelation, Leora (...)
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  39. Melissa McBay Merritt (2010). Review: Clewis, The Kantian Sublime and the Revelation of Freedom. [REVIEW] British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (3):529-532.
    Review of Robert Clewis, _The Kantian Sublime and the Revelation of Freedom_.
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  40. Andrei Buckareff (2009). Metaepistemology and Divine Revelation. Heythrop Journal 50 (1):85-90.
    In Crossing the Threshold of Divine Revelation,1 William Abraham offers a rich, subtle defense of an epistemology of divine revelation. While I believe there is much about Abraham’s work that is commendable, my remarks in this paper will be primarily critical. But the fact that Abraham’s work is worthy of critical comment should be evidence enough of the importance of Abraham’s book. My focus here will be on a cluster of metaepistemological claims made by Abraham. Specifically, I will (...)
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  41.  60
    Nic Damnjanovic (2012). Revelation and Physicalism. Dialectica 66 (1):69-91.
    Revelation is the thesis that having an experience that instantiates some phenomenal property puts us in a position to know the nature or essence of that property. It is widely held that although Revelation is prima facie plausible, it is inconsistent with physicalism, and, in particular, with the claim that phenomenal properties are physical properties. I outline the standard argument for the incompatibility of Revelation and physicalism and compare it with the Knowledge Argument. By doing so, I (...)
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  42.  9
    Matthew I. Burch (2010). Blurred Vision: Marion on the 'Possibility' of Revelation. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 67 (3):157 - 171.
    In this paper I challenge Merold Westphal's claim that Jean-Luc Marion's hermeneutical phenomenology is especially useful for theology. I argue that in spite of his explicit allegiance to Husserl's "principle of all principles," Marion fails to embody a commitment to phenomenological seeing in his analyses of revelation. In the sections of Being Given where he discusses revelation, Marion allows faith-based claims to bleed into his phenomenological analyses, resulting in what I call his 'blurred vision'—the pretension that phenomenological seeing (...)
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  43.  20
    Rolfe King (2012). Divine Revelation. Philosophy Compass 7 (7):495-505.
    Divine revelation is a topical subject, given the many claims to revelation in the modern world. This article looks at recent discussion within the analytic tradition of philosophy which particularly relates to how to evaluate claims about divine revelation. The subjects covered are: defining divine revelation; direct cognition of God; evidence‐based approaches; divine testimony; conversion and faith; competing claims about divine revelation. Brief comments are then made on some related areas.
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  44.  7
    Robert D. Miller (2014). Myth as Revelation. Laval Théologique et Philosophique 70 (3):539-561.
    Robert Miller | : This essay explores how myth functions as a means of revelation in Scripture. It first clarifies a definition of myth, and then discusses the appearance of myth in the Old Testament. Not only is myth found in the Bible, but its presence is of great importance. Considering the various functions of myths in general, it becomes indispensable that myth form a part of the inspired canon. Revelatory myth is essential, especially today. Finally, this essay considers (...)
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  45. David Brown (1999). Tradition and Imagination: Revelation and Change. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Tradition and revelation are often seen as opposites: tradition is viewed as being secondary and reactionary to revelation which is a one-off gift from God. Drawing on examples from Christian history, Judaism, Islam, and the classical world, this book challenges these definitions and presents a controversial examination of the effect history and cultural development has on religious belief: its narratives and art. David Brown pays close attention to the nature of the relationship between historical and imaginative truth, and (...)
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  46.  8
    Warren Carter (2009). Accommodating “Jezebel” and Withdrawing John: Negotiating Empire in Revelation Then and Now. Interpretation 63 (1):32-47.
    Revelation addresses a struggle over how followers of Jesus might negotiate the complex imperial realities of Roman rule. The call for societal distance and disengagement resists and seeks to conceal other voices that urge greater levels of societal interaction. Revelation also raises the urgent issue of how contemporary followers of Jesus might negotiate the world's most powerful empire—the one we in the United States inhabit.
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  47. Mikkel B. Tin (2010). Saturated Phenomena: From Picture to Revelation in Jean-Luc Marion's Phenomenology. Filozofia 65 (9):860-876.
    A phenomenon is that which appears. In his phenomenology, Jean-Luc Marion shows how a phenomenon that appears in and out of itself evades the metaphysical demand of grounding. Classical philosophy has acknowledged phenomena only in so far as they can be sanctioned by the concepts of the intellect. This holds good also of Husserl’s constitutive ego. Now, Marion distinguishes between such intuitively “poor phenomena” and the “saturated phenomena” that exceed the intentional consciousness; they are given not by the consciousness but (...)
     
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  48.  21
    Nancy Levene (2004). Spinoza's Revelation: Religion, Democracy, and Reason. Cambridge University Press.
    Nancy Levene reinterprets a major early-modern philosopher, Benedict de Spinoza - a Jew who was rejected by the Jewish community of his day but whose thought contains, and critiques, both Jewish and Christian ideas. It foregrounds the connection of religion, democracy, and reason, showing that Spinoza's theories of the Bible, the theologico-political, and the philosophical all involve the concepts of equality and sovereignty. Professor Levene argues that Spinoza's concept of revelation is the key to this connection, and above all (...)
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  49.  65
    Steven D. Hales (2004). Intuition, Revelation, and Relativism. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (3):271 – 295.
    This paper defends the view that philosophical propositions are merely relatively true, i.e. true relative to a doxastic perspective defined at least in part by a non-inferential belief-acquiring method. Here is the strategy: first, the primary way that contemporary philosophers defend their views is through the use of rational intuition, and this method delivers non-inferential, basic beliefs which are then systematized and brought into reflective equilibrium. Second, Christian theologians use exactly the same methodology, only replacing intuition with revelation. Third, (...)
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  50.  14
    Fred B. Craddock (1986). Preaching the Book of Revelation. Interpretation 40 (3):270-282.
    Revelation, primarily a liturgical book, invites its readers to sing, to pray, and to praise God; and those who attempt to preach or teach its themes apart from a liturgical setting rob it of much of its power.
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