Search results for 'Rex J. Ahdar' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Rex J. Ahdar (2001). Adrift in a Sea of Rights: A Report Prepared for the New Zealand Education Development Foundation. New Zealand Education Development Foundation.score: 870.0
  2. Rex Ahdar (2013). Is Secularism Neutral? Ratio Juris 26 (3):404-429.score: 240.0
    This article argues that secularism is not neutral. Secularization is a process, the secular state is a structure, whereas secularism is a political philosophy. Secularism takes two main forms: first, a “benevolent” secularism that endeavours to treat all religious and nonreligious belief systems even-handedly, and, second, a “hostile” kind that privileges unbelief and excludes religion from the public sphere. I analyze the European Court of Human Rights decision in Lautsi v Italy, which illustrates these types. The article concludes that secularism (...)
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  3. Rex Ahdar (2003). Indigenous Spiritual Concerns and the Secular State: Some New Zealand Developments. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 23 (4):611-637.score: 240.0
    This article explores the recurrent global claim by indigenous peoples for their spiritual concerns to be taken seriously and given appropriate effect in public policy. The secular liberal state's commitment to ideals of religious neutrality and equal treatment of all faiths and none is clearly tested to the degree it privileges traditional indigenous religion in the name of fostering indigenous culture. This dilemma has been acutely raised in New Zealand where Maori metaphysical concerns—the appeasement of taniwha (spiritual monsters) and the (...)
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  4. Rex Ahdar & Ian Leigh (2005). Religious Freedom in the Liberal State. OUP Oxford.score: 240.0
    There is a growing recognition of the challenge that religions pose for pluralist, multicultural democracies. 'Fundamentalist' beliefs and practices test the limits of religious freedom, and seem to contradict the very basis on which liberal states protect religious liberty. Religions, moreover, are often associated with intolerance and persecution, yet insist upon religious liberty for themselves. This book inverts these stereotypes by presenting a sustained critique of how religious liberty ought to be understood in liberal legal systems and develops an alternative, (...)
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