Search results for 'Rhetoric' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Disciplinarity Rhetoric (2009). Does Rhetoric, as Plato Had Gorgias Claim, Have Other Areas of Knowledge Under its Control? Or, as His Socrates Claimed, Does Rhetoric Have No Use for Knowledge at All? Gorgias Seems to Concede the Point but Counts It an Advantage Rather Than a Deficiency of Rhetoric:“But is This Not a Great Comfort, Socrates, to Be Able Without Learning Any Other Arts but This One to Prove in No Way Inferior to the Specialists?”(Plato, Trans. 1961, P. 459c). This Critique of Rhetoric Mounted in the Early Part of the ... [REVIEW] In A. Lunsford, K. Wilson & R. Eberly (eds.), Sage Handbook of Rhetorical Studies. Sage. 167.score: 190.0
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  2. Anne Sheppard (2008). Rhetoric, Drama and Truth in Plato's Symposium. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (1):28-40.score: 24.0
    This paper draws attention to the Symposium's concern with epideictic rhetoric. It argues that in the Symposium, as in the Gorgias and the Phaedrus, a contrast is drawn between true and false rhetoric. The paper also discusses the dialogue's relationship to drama. Whereas both epideictic rhetoric and drama were directed to a mass audience, the speeches in the Symposium are delivered to a small, select group. The discussion focuses on the style of the speeches delivered by Aristophanes, (...)
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  3. Marina McCoy (2008). Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    In this book, Marina McCoy explores Plato’s treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras. She argues that Plato presents the philosopher and the sophist as difficult to distinguish, insofar as both use rhetoric as part of their arguments. Plato does not present philosophy as rhetoric-free, but rather shows that rhetoric is an integral part of the practice of philosophy.
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  4. John O'Neill (2002). The Rhetoric of Deliberation: Some Problems in Kantian Theories of Deliberative Democracy. Res Publica 8 (3):249-268.score: 24.0
    Deliberative or discursive models of democracy have recently enjoyed a revival in both political theory and policy practice. Against the picture of democracy as a procedure for aggregating and effectively meeting the given preference of individuals, deliberative theory offers a model of democracy as a forum through which judgements and preferences are formed and altered through reasoned dialogue between free and equal citizens. Much in the recent revival of deliberative democracy, especially that which comes through Habermas and Rawls, has Kantian (...)
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  5. Samuel IJsseling (1976). Rhetoric and Philosophy in Conflict: An Historical Survey. M. Nijhoff.score: 24.0
    I THE REHABILITATION OF RHETORIC The ancients denned rhetoric as the art of speaking and writing both well and convincingly: ars bene dicendi and ars ...
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  6. Steve Fuller (2004). Philosophy, Rhetoric, and the End of Knowledge: A New Beginning for Science and Technology Studies. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.score: 24.0
    This volume explores Science & Technology Studies (STS) and its role in redrawing disciplinary boundaries. For scholars/grad students in rhetoric of science, science studies, philosophy & comm, English, sociology & knowledge mgmt.
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  7. Jamie Dow (2007). A Supposed Contradiction About Emotion-Arousal in Aristotle's "Rhetoric". Phronesis 52 (4):382 - 402.score: 24.0
    Aristotle, in the Rhetoric, appears to claim both that emotion-arousal has no place in the essential core of rhetorical expertise and that it has an extremely important place as one of three technical kinds of proof. This paper offers an account of how this apparent contradiction can be resolved. The resolution stems from a new understanding of what Rhetoric I. I refers to - not emotions, but set-piece rhetorical devices aimed at manipulating emotions, which do not depend on (...)
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  8. Seth Benardete (1991). The Rhetoric of Morality and Philosophy: Plato's Gorgias and Phaedrus. University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    Benardete here interprets and, for the first time, pairs two important Platonic dialogues, the Gorgias and the Phaedrus . In linking these dialogues, he places Socrates' notion of rhetoric in a new light and illuminates the way in which Plato gives morality and eros a place in the human soul.
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  9. Nicholas Rescher (1998). The Role of Rhetoric in Rational Argumentation. Argumentation 12 (2):315-323.score: 24.0
    The structure of this discussion will be tripartite. First it will set out a way of distinguishing between rhetoric and strictly rational argumentation. Next it will consider some of the ramifications of this proposed way of looking at the matter – in particular what its implications are for rationality and for rhetoric, respectively. Finally it examines how this perspective bears on the project of philosophizing. The paper's ultimate aim, accordingly, is to consider what light such an analysis can (...)
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  10. Stephen Bygrave (1993). Kenneth Burke: Rhetoric and Ideology. Routledge.score: 24.0
    In a career of over seventy years, Kenneth Burke has produced a body of challenging and fascinating theoretical work. This work has had a bigger reputation than it has had a readership. Burke has been hailed not only as a strong precursor of the work of Fredric Jameson, Frank Lentriccia, and others, but also as a powerful original thinker whose writings have yet to be grappled with. Kenneth Burke: Rhetoric and Ideology is a lucid and accessible introduction to a (...)
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  11. Michael Leff (2000). Rhetoric and Dialectic in the Twenty-First Century. Argumentation 14 (3):241-254.score: 24.0
    The paper presents a historical overview of some characteristic differences between rhetoric and dialectic in the pre-modern tradition. In the light of this historical analysis, some current approaches to dialectic are characterized, with special attention to Ralph Johnson's concept of dialectical tier.
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  12. Ernesto Grassi (1980/2001). Rhetoric as Philosophy: The Humanist Tradition. Southern Illinois University Press.score: 24.0
    Originally published in English in 1980, Rhetoric as Philosophy has been out of print for some time. The reviews of that English edition attest to the importance of Ernesto Grassi’s work. By going back to the Italian humanist tradition and aspects of earlier Greek and Latin thought, Ernesto Grassi develops a conception of rhetoric as the basis of philosophy. Grassi explores the sense in which the first principles of rational thought come from the metaphorical power of the word. (...)
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  13. Paul Hernadi (ed.) (1989). The Rhetoric of Interpretation and the Interpretation of Rhetoric. Duke University Press.score: 24.0
    The Rhetoric of Interpretation Hayden White Contemporary thought about the nature of interpretation, especially in the human and social sciences, ...
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  14. Lisa Keränen (2001). The Hippocratic Oath as Epideictic Rhetoric: Reanimating Medicine's Past for Its Future. Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (1):55-68.score: 24.0
    As an example of Aristotle's genre of epideictic, or ceremonial rhetoric, the Hippocratic Oath has the capacity to persuade its self-addressing audience to appreciate the value of the medical profession by lending an element of stability to the shifting ethos of health care. However, the values it celebrates do not accurately capture communally shared norms about contemporary medical practice. Its multiple and sometimes conflicting versions, anachronistic references, and injunctions that resist translation into specific conduct diminish its longer-term persuasive force. (...)
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  15. Richard A. Cherwitz (ed.) (1990). Rhetoric and Philosophy. L. Erlbaum Associates.score: 24.0
    This important volume explores alternative ways in which those involved in the field of speech communication have attempted to find a philosophical grounding for rhetoric. Recognizing that rhetoric can be supported in a wide variety of ways, this text examines eight different philosophies of rhetoric: realism, relativism, rationalism, idealism, materialism, existentialism, deconstructionism, and pragmatism. The value of this book lies in its pluralistic and comparative approach to rhetorical theory. Although rhetoric may be the more difficult road (...)
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  16. Mark D. Johnston (1996). The Evangelical Rhetoric of Ramon Llull: Lay Learning and Piety in the Christian West Around 1300. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Ramon Llull (1232-1316), born on Majorca, was one of the most remarkable lay intellectuals of the thirteenth century. He devoted much of his life to promoting missions among unbelievers, the reform of Western Christian society, and personal spiritual perfection. He wrote over 200 philosophical and theological works in Catalan, Latin, and Arabic. Many of these expound on his "Great Universal Art of Finding Truth," an idiosyncratic dialectical system that he thought capable of proving Catholic beliefs to non-believers. This study offers (...)
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  17. M. Burke (2008). Advertising Aristotle: A Preliminary Investigation Into the Contemporary Relevance of Aristotle's Art of Rhetoric. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 13 (3-4):295-305.score: 24.0
    In this article, a preliminary investigation will be conducted in order to try to discover whether or not Aristotle’s the Art of Rhetoric can have any relevance as a handbook for the rhetoricians of the twenty-first century and in particular for advertising designers. First, the background against which this question is posed will be set out. Second, the chosen methodology will be explained. Thereafter, some qualitative data will be presented and discussed. Finally, some conclusions will be drawn suggesting that (...)
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  18. J. David Hester (2004). Intersex(Es) and Informed Consent: How Physicians' Rhetoric Constrains Choice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (1):21-49.score: 24.0
    When a child is born with ambiguousgenitalia it is declared a psychosocialemergency, and the policy first proposed byJohn Money (Johns Hopkins University) andadapted by the American Academy of Pediatrics(and more broadly accepted in Canada, the U.K.,and Europe) requires determination ofunderlying condition(s), selection of gender,surgical intervention, and a commitment by allparties to accept the ``real sex'' of thepatient, all no later than 18–24 months,preferably earlier. Ethicists have recentlyquestioned this protocol on several grounds:lack of medical necessity, violation ofinformed consent, uncertainty of (...)
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  19. Louis L. Bucciarelli (2009). The Epistemic Implications of Engineering Rhetoric. Synthese 168 (3):333 - 356.score: 24.0
    The texts (and talk) of engineers take different forms. In this essay, I present and critique several texts written for different purposes and audiences but all intended to convey to the reader the technical details of whatever they are about—whether a textbook passage describing the fundamental behavior of an electrical component, a journal article about a mathematical technique intended for use in design optimization, a memo to co-workers within a firm about a heat transfer analysis of a remotely sited building, (...)
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  20. Devin Stauffer (2006). The Unity of Plato's Gorgias: Rhetoric, Justice, and the Philosophic Life. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Devin Stauffer demonstrates the complex unity of Plato's Gorgias, through a careful analysis of the dialogue's three main sections, including Socrates' famous argumentative duel with Callicles, a passionate critic of justice and philosophy. He reveals how the seemingly disparate themes of rhetoric, justice, and the philosophic life are woven together into a coherent whole. Stauffer's interpretation of the Gorgias sheds new light on Plato's thought, indicating that Plato and Socrates had a more favorable view of rhetoric than is (...)
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  21. Antoine C. Braet (1992). Ethos, Pathos and Logos in Aristotle's Rhetoric: A Re-Examination. [REVIEW] Argumentation 6 (3):307-320.score: 24.0
    In Aristotle's Rhetoric, logos must be conceived as enthymematical argumentation relative to the issue of the case. Ethos and pathos also can take the form of an enthymeme, but this argumentation doesn't relate (directly) to the issue. In this kind of enthymeme, the conclusion is relative to the ethos of the speaker or (reasons for) the pathos of the audience. In an ideal situation — with a good procedure and rational judges — logos dominates and in the real situation (...)
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  22. Steven Mailloux (ed.) (1995). Rhetoric, Sophistry, Pragmatism. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    The anti-sceptical relativism and self-conscious rhetoric of the pragmatist tradition, which began with the Older Sophists of Ancient Greece and developed through an American tradition including William James and John Dewey has attracted new attention in the context of late twentieth-century postmodernist thought. At the same time there has been a more general renewal of interest across a wide range of humanistic and social science disciplines in rhetoric itself: language use, writing and speaking, persuasion, figurative language, and the (...)
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  23. Steve Mackey (2013). Rhetoric and Rationality. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):203-224.score: 24.0
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";} The dominance of a purist, ‘scientistic’ form of reason since the Enlightenment has eclipsed and produced multiple misunderstandings of the nature, role of and importance of the millennia-old art of rhetoric. For centuries the multiple perspectives conveyed by rhetoric were always the counterbalance to hubristic claims (...)
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  24. Michael Davis (1999). Rhetoric, Technical Writing, and Ethics. Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (4):463-478.score: 24.0
    Many outside science and engineering, especially social scientists and “rhetoricians”, claim that rhetoric, “the art of persuasion”, is an important part of technical communication. This claim is either trivial or false. If “persuasion” simply means “effective communication”, then, of course, rhetoric is an important part of technical communication. But, if “persuasion” has anything like its traditional meaning (a specific art of winning conviction), rhetoric is not an important part of technical communication; indeed, its use in technical communication (...)
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  25. Chris Heffer (2013). Revelation and Rhetoric: A Critical Model of Forensic Discourse. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 26 (2):459-485.score: 24.0
    Over the past thirty years or so, theoretical work in such fields as legal semiotics and law and literature has argued that the legal process is profoundly rhetorical. At the same time, a number of communication-based disciplines such as semiotics, sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology have provided, particularly in interdisciplinary combination with law, a wealth of empirical evidence on, and insight into, the micro-contexts of language and communication in the legal process. However, while these invaluable nitty-gritty analyses provide empirical support for (...)
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  26. Antonia Larraín & Andrés Haye (2012). The Role of Rhetoric in a Dialogical Approach to Thinking. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (2):220-237.score: 24.0
    The central idea of the paper is that human thinking consists in a movement through which a person socially interacts with herself. Consequently, thinking does not offer the experience of a private refuge in the intimacy of the individual thinker's self-knowing, but a field where multiple points of view interact by contesting, distancing, approaching, agreeing or disagreeing, one to another. Classical (Isocrates, 1929/1968) and contemporary (Billig, 1987) rhetorical approaches to thinking stress that both “inner” and “social” discourse are addressed to (...)
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  27. Nicolás Parra (2012). Friendship and war: True political art as the alliance of philosophy and rhetoric in Plato's gorgias. Ideas y Valores 61 (SPE149):59-83.score: 24.0
    The paper explores the relation between philosophy and rhetoric from a new perspective by highlighting the dramatic nature of the dialogue and paying attention not only to what is said about philosophy and rhetoric but also to what is shown, especially through Gorgias' intervention throughout the dialogue in order to save a community of dialogue that inquires into the good and the just. This re-conception of the relation between philosophy and rhetoric implies a re-conception of the practice (...)
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  28. Michael Billig (1998). Rhetoric and the Unconscious. Argumentation 12 (2):199-216.score: 24.0
    This paper develops the ideas of rhetorical psychology by applying them to some basic Freudian concepts. In so doing, the paper considers whether there might be a ‘Dialogic Unconscious’. So far rhetorical psychology has tended to concentrate upon conscious thought rather than on the unconscious. It has suggested that thinking is modelled on argument and dialogue, and that rhetoric provides the means of opening up matters for thought and discussion. However, rhetoric may also provide the means for closing (...)
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  29. Lucinda Vandervort (2004). Honest Beliefs, Credible Lies, and Culpable Awareness: Rhetoric, Inequality, and Mens Rea in Sexual Assault. Osgoode Hall Law Journal 42 (4):625-660.score: 24.0
    The exculpatory rhetorical power of the term “honest belief” continues to invite reliance on the bare credibility of belief in consent to determine culpability in sexual assault. In law, however, only a comprehensive analysis of mens rea, including an examination of the material facts and circumstances of which the accused was aware, demonstrates whether a “belief” in consent was or was not reckless or wilfully blind. An accused's “honest belief” routinely begs this question, leading to a truncated analysis of criminal (...)
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  30. Nancy S. Struever (2009). Rhetoric, Modality, Modernity. The University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    Persuasive and perceptive, Rhetoric, Modality, Modernity is a novel rewriting of the history of rhetoric and a heady examination of the motives, issues, and ...
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  31. AntoineC Braet (1996). On the Origin of Normative Argumentation Theory: The Paradoxical Case of the Rhetoric to Alexander. [REVIEW] Argumentation 10 (3):347-359.score: 24.0
    The Rhetoric to Alexander (second half of the fourth century B.C.) is among the oldest contributions to the study of argumentation. From antiquity on, this treatise, which abounds in opportunistic advice, has come under heavy criticism on normative grounds. And yet, as I shall maintain here, it clearly takes into account the requirements of rational argumentation which are still in use today. Moreover, it contains the seeds of a whole series of doctrines found in modern normative argumentation theory. There (...)
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  32. Robert Wess (1996). Kenneth Burke: Rhetoric, Subjectivity, Postmodernism. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Kenneth Burke, arguably the most important American literary theorist of the twentieth century, helped define the theoretical terrain for contemporary literary and cultural studies. His perspectives were literary and linguistic, but his influences ranged across history, philosophy, and the social sciences. In this important and original study Robert Wess traces the trajectory of Burke's long career and situates his work in relation to postmodernity. His study is both an examination of contemporary theories of rhetoric, ideology, and the subject, and (...)
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  33. David Zarefsky (2006). Strategic Maneuvering Through Persuasive Definitions: Implications for Dialectic and Rhetoric. [REVIEW] Argumentation 20 (4):399-416.score: 24.0
    Persuasive definitions – those that convey an attitude in the act of naming – are frequently employed in discourse and are a form of strategic maneuvering. The dynamics of persuasive definition are explored through brief case studies and an extended analysis of the use of the “war” metaphor in responding to terrorism after September 11, 2001. Examining persuasive definitions enables us to notice similarities and differences between strategic maneuvering in dialectical and in rhetorical argument, as well as differences between the (...)
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  34. Thomas Foreman (2014). Ethics, Rhetoric, and Expectations: Responsibilities and Obligations of Health Care Systems. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):295-299.score: 24.0
    Health care organization foundations and other fund-raising departments often function at an arm’s length from the system at large. As such, operations related to their mandate to raise funds and market the organization do not receive the same level of ethical scrutiny brought to bear on other arms within the organization. An area that could benefit from a more focused ethics lens is the use of language and rhetoric employed in order to raise funds and market the organization. Such (...)
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  35. G. Thomas Goodnight (1993). A ?New Rhetoric? For a ?New Dialectic?: Prolegomena to a Responsible Public Argument. [REVIEW] Argumentation 7 (3):329-342.score: 24.0
    This essay offers, as a counterpart to pragma-dialectical argument, a “new rhetoric” produced in the situated discourse of a public forum when a community addresses matters of common urgency and undertakes informed action. Such a rhetoric takes the principles of discourse ethics as its informing dialectic by identifying an interlocutor as one who is obligatedboth to argue effectively,and also to hold open, even reinforce, norms of communicative reason. Implications concerning the study of fallacies and theethos obligations of communicative (...)
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  36. Michael Leff (1993). The Uses of Aristotle's Rhetoric in Contemporary American Scholarship. Argumentation 7 (3):313-327.score: 24.0
    In contemporary American scholarship, interpretation of Aristotle'sRhetoric has become the locus of sustained and sharp controversy. Differing views of theRhetoric and its significance have become tokens in a more general dispute about what rhetoric is or ought to be. This essay examines three central issues that have emerged in this larger arena of controversy: the relationship between Aristotelian and Platonic conceptions of rhetoric, the relationships among rhetoric, ethics, and epistemology in Aristotle, and the placement of rhetoric (...)
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  37. Jeffrey J. Maciejewski (2005). Reason as a Nexus of Natural Law and Rhetoric. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (3):247 - 257.score: 24.0
    . Although the pages of Journal of Business Ethics have hosted an ongoing dialogue on the ethics of rhetoric and persuasion, the debates have been unable to account for the underlying morality of the human propensity to engage in rhetorical discourse as a part of living in society. In this paper, I offer natural-law ethical theory as a moral paradigm in which to examine rhetoric. In this context, I assert that rhetoric services reason, which in turn services (...)
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  38. Ruth Amossy (2009). The New Rhetoric's Inheritance. Argumentation 23 (3):313-324.score: 24.0
    This paper aims at showing how the New Rhetoric’s insights allow for an integration of argumentation studies in linguistic investigation, and more specifically in discourse analysis. Claiming that argumentativity is a constitutive feature of discourse, it endeavors to explore logos as both reason and language by analyzing patterns of reasoning in their discursive actualization. In this approach, the attempt at influencing the audience’s representations is analyzed in the complexity of a discourse explored in its formal and socio-institutional dimensions.
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  39. Alexander Brink (2009). Hirschman's Rhetoric of Reaction: U.S. And German Insights in Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):109 - 122.score: 24.0
    In recent times, representatives of American management science have been arguing increasingly for a functionalization of ethics to change economic thinking: what they are seeking is the systematic integration of ethics into the economic paradigm. Using the insights developed by Hirschman, I would like to show how one must first expose the rhetoric of those critics of change (referred to below as conservatives or reactionaries) in order then to implement that which is new (representatives of this approach are referred (...)
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  40. Hanns Hohmann (2000). Rhetoric and Dialectic: Some Historical and Legal Perspectives. [REVIEW] Argumentation 14 (3):223-234.score: 24.0
    The thesis is defended that rhetoric is not, as is often said, a discipline which is hierarchically subordinate to dialectic. It is argued that the modalities of the links between rhetoric and dialectic must be seen in a somewhat different light: rhetoric and dialectic should be viewed as two complementary disciplines. On the basis of a historical survey of the views of various authors on the links between rhetoric and dialectic, it is concluded that efforts to (...)
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  41. David J. Depew (2013). The Rhetoric of Evolutionary Theory. Biological Theory 7 (4):380-389.score: 24.0
    I argue that Darwinian evolutionary theory has a rhetorical dimension and that rhetorical criticism plays a role in how evolutionary science acquires knowledge. I define what I mean by rhetoric by considering Darwin’s Origin. I use the Modern Evolutionary Synthesis to show how rhetoric conceived as situated and addressed argumentation enters into evolutionary theorizing. Finally, I argue that rhetorical criticism helps judge the success, limits, and failures of these theories.
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  42. Manfred Kienpointner (1993). The Empirical Relevance of Perelman's New Rhetoric. Argumentation 7 (4):419-437.score: 24.0
    Perelman's work has been very influential in various disciplines, among them philosophy, rhetoric and law. Especially the typology of argumentative schemes which he developed together with L. Olbrechts-Tyteca has been considered as an excellent classification of arguments in natural language. There are, however, some weaknesses of this typology which make its application to empirical research quite difficult, namely, the lack of explicitness and the absence of clear criteria of demarcation. Still, the typology is highly relevant for empirical research, if (...)
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  43. Miklós Könczöl (2009). What There is Left and How It Works: Ancient Rhetoric and the Semiotics of Law. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 22 (4):399-410.score: 24.0
    The present paper examines three parts of ancient school rhetoric: the issues, the topics, and the questions of style from the perspective of legal semiotics. It aims (1) to demonstrate the roles these have played and can play in the interpretation of legal discourses; and (2) to summarise what insights have been and can be gained from this classical tradition by contemporary legal research. It is argued that the promise of legal semiotics for rhetorical investigations is that it may (...)
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  44. Erik C. W. Krabbe (2000). Meeting in the House of Callias: Rhetoric and Dialectic. [REVIEW] Argumentation 14 (3):205-217.score: 24.0
    The purpose of this paper is to briefly describe and compare the original goals and perspectives of both rhetoric and dialectic in theory and in practice. Dialectic is the practice and theory of conversations; rhetoric that of speeches. For theory of dialectic, this paper will turn to Aristotle's Topics and Sophistical Refutations; for theory of rhetoric, to his Rhetoric. Thus it will appear that rhetoric and dialectic are pretty close. Yet, on the other hand, there (...)
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  45. John Lyne (1994). Social Epistemology as a Rhetoric of Inquiry. Argumentation 8 (2):111-124.score: 24.0
    Fuller's program of social epistemology engages a rhetoric of inquiry that can be usefully compared and contrasted with other discursive theories of knowledge, such as that of Richard Rorty. Resisting the model of “conversation,” Fuller strikes an activist posture and lays the groundwork for normative “knowledge policy,” in which persuasion and credibility play key roles. The image of investigation is one that overtly rejects the “storehouse” conception of knowledge and invokes the metaphors of distributive economics. Productive questions arise as (...)
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  46. Joseph Margolis (1995). Beyond Postmodernism: Logic as Rhetoric. [REVIEW] Argumentation 9 (1):21-31.score: 24.0
    The essay reviews the relationship between logic and rhetoric under the conditions of historicity and shows how (and why) the rules of logic may be construed as projected from the rhetorical practices of actual societies; why and how they are subject to revision; and why there is reason to think it could not be otherwise.
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  47. Carmen Pérez-Llantada (2012). Scientific Discourse and the Rhetoric of Globalization: The Impact of Culture and Language. Continuum International Pub. Group.score: 24.0
    The role of science rhetoric in the global village -- Scientific English in the postmodern age -- Problematizing the rhetoric of contemporary science -- A contrastive rhetoric approach to science dissemination -- Disciplinary practices and procedures within research sites -- Triangulating procedures, practices and texts in scientific discourse -- ELF and a more complex sociolinguistic landscape -- Re-defining the rhetoric of science.
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  48. Carlo Sini (1990). Dialectic, Rhetoric and Writing: The Problem of Method. [REVIEW] Argumentation 4 (1):101-108.score: 24.0
    The problem of method is the problem of knowledge itself. As it is known, method (méthodos) also means way (odós). Philosophy is at the same time a form of knowledge and a technique of argumentation. In this second meaning, philosophy is mainly an art of both logical and rhetorical word. Consequently a profane voice reveals itself in the signs of philosophic knowledge, which on the one hand establishes the “logistic” (logistiké) soul, on the other the totalizing view of truth. Then (...)
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  49. Rozalia Bako & Laszlo-Attila Hubbes (2011). Religious Minorities' Web Rhetoric: Romanian and Hungarian Ethno-Pagan Organizations. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (30):127-158.score: 24.0
    The comparative study of Romanian and Hungarian Neopagan organizations with an ethnocentric or "Ethno-pagan" ideology is an exploratory research aimed at mapping the similarities and the differences between these religious minorities, with a highlight on their level of institutionalization, their core values and degree of political mobilization. Zalmoxian groups and organizations promote the revival of Romanian spirituality through a process of reconnection to its ancient, supposedly Dacian and Thracian roots; by the same token, Hungarian Shamanist movements are aimed at recovering (...)
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  50. Floriana Grasso (2002). Towards Computational Rhetoric. Informal Logic 22 (3).score: 24.0
    The notions of argument and argumentation have become increasingly ubiquitous in Artificial Intelligence research, with various application and interpretations. Less attention has been, however, specifically devoted to rhetorical argument The work presented in this paper aims at bridging this gap, by proposing a framework for characterising rhetorical argumentation, based on Perelman and Olbrechts-Tyteca's New Rhetoric. The paper provides an overview of the state of the art of computational work based on, or dealing with, rhetorical aspects of argumentation, before presenting (...)
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