Search results for 'Rhetoric, Medieval' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Hanns Hohmann (1998). Logic and Rhetoric in Legal Argumentation: Some Medieval Perspectives. Argumentation 12 (1):39-55.
    While the formal treatment of arguments in the late medieval modi arguendi owes much to dialectic, this does not remove the substance and function of the argumentative modes discussed from the realm of rhetoric. These works, designed to teach law students skills in legal argumentation, remain importantly focused on persuasive features of argumentation which have traditionally been strongly associated with a rhetorical approach, particularly in efforts to differentiate from it dialectic as a more strictly scientific and logical form of (...)
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  2. Deborah L. Black (1990). Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy. E.J. Brill.
  3.  1
    Andrew Galloway (1995). The Rhetoric of Riddling in Late-Medieval England: The “Oxford” Riddles, the Secretum Philosophorum, and the Riddles in Piers Plowman. Speculum 70 (1):68-105.
    Scholars have long recognized that riddles were part of literary and intellectual culture in late-medieval England, and considerable effort has been expended to ponder a prominent handful of late-fourteenth-century writings in Latin and English that use them, including John Ergome's commentary on the Vaticinium of “John of Bridlington,” the seditious vernacular letters circulated during the Rising of 1381, and most famously Piers Plowman, all notorious for the use of peculiar and difficult riddles that flaunt their interpretative challenges and the (...)
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  4.  5
    Craig Smith (1972). The Medieval Subjugation and the Existential Elevation of Rhetoric. Philosophy and Rhetoric 5 (3):159 - 174.
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  5. Harry Caplan, Anne King & Helen North (1972). Of Eloquence: Studies in Ancient and Mediaeval Rhetoric by Harry Caplan. Philosophy and Rhetoric 5 (3):196-197.
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  6. Virginia Cox & John Ward (eds.) (2006). The Rhetoric of Cicero in its Medieval and Early Renaissance Commentary Tradition. Brill.
    This volume examines the transmission and influence of Ciceronian rhetoric from late antiquity to the fifteenth century, examining the relationship between rhetoric and practices as diverse as law, dialectic, memory theory, poetics, and ethics. Includes an appendix of primary texts.
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  7. Virginia Cox & John Ward (eds.) (2011). The Rhetoric of Cicero in its Medieval and Early Renaissance Commentary Tradition. Brill.
    This volume examines the transmission and influence of Ciceronian rhetoric from late antiquity to the fifteenth century, examining the relationship between rhetoric and practices as diverse as law, dialectic, memory theory, poetics, and ethics. Includes an appendix of primary texts.
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  8. James J. Murphy (1980). Medieval Eloquence: Studies in the Theory and Practice of Medieval Rhetoric. Philosophy and Rhetoric 13 (2):131-136.
     
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  9.  8
    James Ford (2002). Jōkei and the Rhetoric of “Other Power” and “Easy Practice” in Medieval Japanese Buddhism. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 29 (1-2):67-106.
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  10.  7
    Roy J. Deferrari (1928). Medieval Rhetoric and Poetic. New Scholasticism 2 (3):323-323.
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  11.  12
    Parviz Morewedge (1992). Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy, And: The Poetics of Alfarabi and Avicenna. Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (4):605-608.
  12.  11
    Paul E. Walker (1992). Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 45 (3):600-602.
  13.  2
    Theresa Coletti (2001). Jody Enders, The Medieval Theater of Cruelty: Rhetoric, Memory, Violence. Ithaca, NY, and London: Cornell University Press, 1999. Pp. Xx, 268; Black-and-White Frontispiece and Black-and-White Illustrations. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 76 (2):444-446.
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  14.  1
    Martin Irvine (1993). Rita Copeland, Rhetoric, Hermeneutics, and Translation in the Middle Ages: Academic Traditions and Vernacular Texts.(Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature, 11.) Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1991. Pp. Xiv, 295; Black-and-White Frontispiece. [REVIEW] Speculum 68 (4):1091-1093.
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  15.  6
    M. Winterbottom (1972). Rhetoric Harry Caplan: Of Eloquence: Studies in Ancient and Mediaeval Rhetoric. Edited by Anne King and Helen North. Pp. Xiii+289. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1970. Cloth, £4·05. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 22 (03):363-364.
  16.  3
    Rita Copeland (2014). Pathos and Pastoralism: Aristotle's Rhetoric in Medieval England. Speculum 89 (1):96-127.
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  17.  2
    Michelle R. Wright (1996). Scott D. Troyan, Textual Decorum: A Rhetoric of Attitudes in Medieval Literature.(Garland Studies in Medieval Literature, 12; Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, 1814.) New York and London: Garland, 1994. Pp. Ix, 288. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (4):1033-1035.
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  18.  1
    Alan E. Knight (1995). Jody Enders, Rhetoric and the Origins of Medieval Drama.(Rhetoric & Society.) Ithaca, NY, and London: Cornell University Press, 1992. Pp. Xiv, 281. $35.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 70 (3):611-614.
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  19.  1
    Nicola Coldstream (2006). Rachel Ann Dressler, Of Armor and Men in Medieval England: The Chivalric Rhetoric of Three English Knights' Effigies. Aldershot, Eng., and Burlington, Vt.: Ashgate, 2004. Pp. Xii, 145 Plus 71 Black-and-White and Color Figures. $79.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (2):502-504.
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  20.  1
    Julian Weiss (2010). Jill Ross, Figuring the Feminine: The Rhetoric of Female Embodiment in Medieval Hispanic Literature. Toronto; Buffalo, NY; and London: University of Toronto Press, 2008. Pp. Ix, 305. $75. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (1):193-195.
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  21.  1
    Martin Camargo (1995). Robert L. Kindrick, Henryson and the Medieval Arts of Rhetoric.(Garland Studies in Medieval Literature, 8.) New York and London: Garland, 1993. Pp. Xiii, 345. $54. [REVIEW] Speculum 70 (1):163-165.
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  22.  1
    Karl F. Morrison (2012). Review Carruthers, Ed., Rhetoric Beyond Words: Delight and Persuasion in the Arts of the Middle Ages. (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature 78.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Pp. Xii, 316; 29 B&W Figs., 2 Tables, and 7 Musical Examples. $99. ISBN: 9780521515306. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (3):852-854.
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  23. B. E. B. E. (1986). Classical Rhetoric and Medieval Historiography. Edited by Ernst Breisach. [REVIEW] History and Theory 25 (2):221.
     
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  24. Hanns Hohmann (1999). Rhetoric in Medieval Legal Education: Libellus Pylei Disputatorius. Disputatio 4:59.
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  25. Alfred Ivry (1993). Logic and Aristotle's “Rhetoric” and “Poetics” in Medieval Arabic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Speculum 68 (4):1067-1069.
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  26. E. J. Leiden, Michael Fuss, Har Gibb, Jh Kramers, Salim Kemal, Richard Kieckehefer, George D. Bond, Bk Matilal, Oxford Oxford & W. Montgomery Watt (1992). AL-AZMEH, A.(1990) Ibn Khaldun, London, Routledge. ALON, ILAI (1991) Socrates in Mediaeval Arabic Literature, Leiden, EJ Brill. BENN, CHARLES D.(1991) The Cavern Mystery Transmission, Hawaii, University of Hawaii Press. BHARADWAJA, VK (1990) Form and Validity in Indian Logic, Shimla, Indian Institute of Advanced Study. BLACK, DEBORAH L.(1990) Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Mediaeval Arabic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Asian Philosophy 2 (1):117.
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  27. Leslie Lockett (2013). Rita Copeland and Ineke Sluiter, Eds., Medieval Grammar and Rhetoric: Language Arts and Literary Theory, AD 300–1475. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. Xii, 972. $175. ISBN: 9780198183419. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (1):271-274.
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  28. James J. Murphy (1999). AMS, 1972. Baldwin, Charles S. Medieval Rhetoric and Poetic (to 1400) Interpreted From Representative Works. New York: Macmillan, 1928. Repr. [REVIEW] Disputatio 4:127.
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  29. James Murphy (1977). Nicolaus Dybinus' “Declaracio Oracionis de Beata Dorothea”: Studies and Documents in the History of Late Medieval Rhetoric. [REVIEW] Speculum 52 (3):699-701.
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  30. Ian Netton, Oliver Leaman & Whalen Lai (1992). Review of Ibn Rushd , by Dominique Urvoy ; Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy, by Deborah L. Black ; Philosophy and Science in the Islamic World, by C. A. Qadir ; Understanding the Chinese Mind: The Philosophical Roots, by Robert E. Allinson ; On Justice: An Essay in Jewish Philosophy, by . L. E. Goodman. [REVIEW] Asian Philosophy 2 (1):101-113.
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  31. Siegfried Wenzel (1993). Sabine Volk-Birke, Chaucer and Medieval Preaching: Rhetoric for Listeners in Sermons and Poetry.(Scriptoralia, 34.) Tübingen: Gunter Narr, 1991. Pp. 315. [REVIEW] Speculum 68 (3):903-905.
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  32.  19
    Mark D. Johnston (1996). The Evangelical Rhetoric of Ramon Llull: Lay Learning and Piety in the Christian West Around 1300. Oxford University Press.
    Ramon Llull (1232-1316), born on Majorca, was one of the most remarkable lay intellectuals of the thirteenth century. He devoted much of his life to promoting missions among unbelievers, the reform of Western Christian society, and personal spiritual perfection. He wrote over 200 philosophical and theological works in Catalan, Latin, and Arabic. Many of these expound on his "Great Universal Art of Finding Truth," an idiosyncratic dialectical system that he thought capable of proving Catholic beliefs to non-believers. This study offers (...)
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  33. C. J. Mews, Cary J. Nederman, Rodney M. Thomson & John O. Ward (2003). Rhetoric and Renewal in the Latin West 1100-1540 Essays in Honour of John O. Ward.
     
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  34.  30
    Jeanette M. A. Beer (1981). Narrative Conventions of Truth in the Middle Ages. Librairie Droz.
    ETUDES DE PHILOLOGIE 38 ETD'HISTOIRE JEANETTE MA BEER Narrative Conventions of Truth in the Middle Ages GENEVE ...
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  35. Muhammad Salim Farabi, Salim & Aristotle (1976). Kitab Fi Al-Mantiq. Al-Hay Ah Al-Misriyah Al- Ammah Lil-Kitab.
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  36. J. Stephen Russell (1998). Chaucer and the Trivium the Mindsong of the Canterbury Tales.
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  37.  33
    Raul Corazzon, History of Medieval Logic: A General Overview.
    "The role of logic in the Middle Ages. Regarding the role of logic within the framework of arts and sciences during the Middle Ages, we have to distinguish two related aspects, one institutional and the other scientific. As to the first aspect, we have to remember that the medieval educational system was based on the seven liberal arts, which were divided into the trivium, i.e., three arts of language, and the quadrivium, i.e., four mathematical arts. The so-called trivial arts (...)
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  38.  1
    Robert Glendinning (1992). Eros, Agape, and Rhetoric Around 1200: Gervase of Melkley's Ars Poetica and Gottfried von Strassburg's Tristan. Speculum 67 (4):892-925.
    In two previous articles I have examined the presence of elements related to love and sex in rhetorical manuals of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries and compared such elements with similar material in a number of literary texts of the same period. The relationship between the two kinds of texts appears to be closer than would be expected solely on the grounds that they were written in an age interested in both eros and rhetoric, and I have suggested that the (...)
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  39.  3
    Niels Green-Pedersen (1987). The Topics in Medieval Logic. Argumentation 1 (4):407-417.
    The topics is a theory of argumentation based upon topoi or in Latin loci. The medieval logicians used works by Aristotle and Boethius as their sources for this doctrine, but they developed it in a rather original way. The topics became a higher-level analysis of arguments which are non-valid from a purely formal point of view, but where it is none the less legitimate to infer the conclusion from the premiss. In this connection the topics give rise to a (...)
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  40. Marcia L. Colish (1983). The Mirror of Language a Study in the Medieval Theory of Knowledge. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  41.  10
    Max Lejbowicz (2013). Retour sur l'affaire Gouguenheim. Methodos 13 (13).
    Une invitation, reçue au début de l’automne 2011, à intervenir dans la séance du 7 mars 2012 d’un séminaire tenu à l’EHESS sur l’islamophobie, a été l’occasion de traiter de « l’affaire Gouguenheim » plus de trois ans après son irruption dans la sphère médiatique. Cette nouvelle lecture d’Aristote au Mont Saint-Michel a permis de mettre en évidence l’importance que Sylvain Gouguenheim attribue à un texte du haut Moyen Age pour suivre la diffusion de l’hellénisme dans l’Europe latine. Il s’agit (...)
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  42.  3
    Mark D. Jordan (1994). The Competition of Authoritative Languages and Aquinas's Theological Rhetoric. Medieval Philosophy & Theology 4:71-90.
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  43.  38
    Aurélien Robert (2012). L'idée de Logique Morale aux XIIIe Et XIVe Siècles. Médiévales 63:27-45.
    This paper tries to understand how three medieval philosophers (Roger Bacon, Albert the Great and John Buridan) developed the idea of a special logic for ethics, taking into account Aristotle's thesis according to which ethics does not need theoretical syllogisms and uses a special kind of scientific reasoning. If rhetoric is a good candidate, we find three different readings of this approach and then three different theories of ethical reasoning.
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  44.  9
    Richard J. Schoeck (1968). On Rhetoric in Fourteenth Century Oxford. Mediaeval Studies 30 (1):214-225.
  45.  11
    Mark D. Jordan (1994). The Competition of Authoritative Languages and Aquinas's Theological Rhetoric. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 4:71-90.
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  46. Michael Foster (2006). Text and Voice: The Rhetoric of Authority in the Middle Ages. [REVIEW] The Medieval Review 5.
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  47. Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (1989). Friedrich Nietzsche on Rhetoric and Language. Oxford University Press.
    Presenting the entire German text of Nietzsche's lectures on rhetoric and language and his notes for them, as well as facing page English translations, this book fills an important gap in the philosopher's corpus. Until now unavailable or existing only in fragmentary form, the lectures represent a major portion of Nietzsche's achievement. Included are an extensive editors' introduction on the background of Nietzsche's understanding of rhetoric, and critical notes identifying his sources and independent contributions.
     
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  48. Thomas M. Carr (2009). Descartes and the Resilience of Rhetoric: Varieties of Cartesian Rhetorical Theory. Southern Illinois University Press.
    A careful analysis of the rhetorical thought of René Descartes and of a distinguished group of post-Cartesians. Covering a unique range of authors, including Bernard Lamy and Nicolas Malebranche, Carr attacks the idea, which has become commonplace in contemporary criticism, that the Cartesian system is incompatible with rhetoric. Carr analyzes the writings of Balzac, the Port-Royalists Arnauld and Nicole, Malebranche, and Lamy, exploring the evolution of Descartes’ thought into their different theories of rhetoric. He constructs his arguments, probing each author’s (...)
     
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  49. Jeff Mason (1989). Philosophical Rhetoric: The Function of Indirection in Philosophical Writing. Routledge.
    This book, originally published in 1989 discusses an issue central to all philosophical argument – the relation between persuasion and truth. The techniques of persuasion are indirect and not always fully transparent. Whether philosophers and theoreticians are for or against the use of rhetoric, they engage in rhetorical practice none the less. Focusing on Plato, Descartes, Kant, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche and Wittgenstein, this book uncovers philosophical rhetoric at work and reminds us of the rhetorical arena in which philosophical writings are produced (...)
     
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  50.  3
    Joseph Tinguely (2015). The Implicit Affection Between Kantian Judgment and Aristotelian Rhetoric. Philosophy and Rhetoric 48 (1):1-25.
    Recent scholarship on Kant and rhetoric suggests an inclusive relation between affectivity and cognitive judgment, but that position runs counter to a traditional philosophical opposition between sensibility and rationality. A way to overcome this opposition comes into view in the overlap in three significant areas between Kantian judgment and Aristotelian rhetoric. First, each allows that communicative capacities operate within the way a perceptual object or scene appears in the first place. Secondly, each significantly broadens such communicative capacities so as to (...)
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