Search results for 'Rhetoric, Medieval' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mark D. Johnston (1996). The Evangelical Rhetoric of Ramon Llull: Lay Learning and Piety in the Christian West Around 1300. Oxford University Press.score: 51.0
    Ramon Llull (1232-1316), born on Majorca, was one of the most remarkable lay intellectuals of the thirteenth century. He devoted much of his life to promoting missions among unbelievers, the reform of Western Christian society, and personal spiritual perfection. He wrote over 200 philosophical and theological works in Catalan, Latin, and Arabic. Many of these expound on his "Great Universal Art of Finding Truth," an idiosyncratic dialectical system that he thought capable of proving Catholic beliefs to non-believers. This study offers (...)
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  2. Deborah L. Black (1990). Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy. E.J. Brill.score: 42.0
  3. Parviz Morewedge (1992). Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy, And: The Poetics of Alfarabi and Avicenna (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (4):605-608.score: 36.0
  4. Rita Copeland (2014). Pathos and Pastoralism: Aristotle's Rhetoric in Medieval England. Speculum 89 (1):96-127.score: 36.0
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  5. Paul E. Walker (1992). Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 45 (3):600-602.score: 36.0
  6. Hanns Hohmann (1998). Logic and Rhetoric in Legal Argumentation: Some Medieval Perspectives. Argumentation 12 (1):39-55.score: 36.0
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  7. Karl F. Morrison (2012). Review Carruthers, Ed., Rhetoric Beyond Words: Delight and Persuasion in the Arts of the Middle Ages. (Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature 78.) Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Pp. Xii, 316; 29 B&W Figs., 2 Tables, and 7 Musical Examples. $99. ISBN: 9780521515306. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (3):852-854.score: 36.0
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  8. Michelle R. Wright (1996). Scott D. Troyan, Textual Decorum: A Rhetoric of Attitudes in Medieval Literature.(Garland Studies in Medieval Literature, 12; Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, 1814.) New York and London: Garland, 1994. Pp. Ix, 288. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 71 (4):1033-1035.score: 36.0
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  9. Martin Camargo (1995). Robert L. Kindrick, Henryson and the Medieval Arts of Rhetoric.(Garland Studies in Medieval Literature, 8.) New York and London: Garland, 1993. Pp. Xiii, 345. $54. [REVIEW] Speculum 70 (1):163-165.score: 36.0
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  10. Theresa Coletti (2001). Jody Enders, The Medieval Theater of Cruelty: Rhetoric, Memory, Violence. Ithaca, NY, and London: Cornell University Press, 1999. Pp. Xx, 268; Black-and-White Frontispiece and Black-and-White Illustrations. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 76 (2):444-446.score: 36.0
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  11. Nicola Coldstream (2006). Rachel Ann Dressler, Of Armor and Men in Medieval England: The Chivalric Rhetoric of Three English Knights' Effigies. Aldershot, Eng., and Burlington, Vt.: Ashgate, 2004. Pp. Xii, 145 Plus 71 Black-and-White and Color Figures. $79.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 81 (2):502-504.score: 36.0
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  12. Roy J. Deferrari (1928). Medieval Rhetoric and Poetic. New Scholasticism 2 (3):323-323.score: 36.0
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  13. James L. Ford (forthcoming). Jōkei and the Rhetoric of" Other-Power" and" Easy Practice" in Medieval Japanese Buddhism. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.score: 36.0
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  14. Andrew Galloway (1995). The Rhetoric of Riddling in Late-Medieval England: The “Oxford” Riddles, the Secretum Philosophorum, and the Riddles in Piers Plowman. Speculum 70 (1):68-105.score: 36.0
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  15. Hanns Hohmann (1999). Rhetoric in Medieval Legal Education: Libellus Pylei Disputatorius. Disputatio 4:59.score: 36.0
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  16. Martin Irvine (1993). Rita Copeland, Rhetoric, Hermeneutics, and Translation in the Middle Ages: Academic Traditions and Vernacular Texts.(Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature, 11.) Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1991. Pp. Xiv, 295; Black-and-White Frontispiece. [REVIEW] Speculum 68 (4):1091-1093.score: 36.0
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  17. Alan E. Knight (1995). Jody Enders, Rhetoric and the Origins of Medieval Drama.(Rhetoric & Society.) Ithaca, NY, and London: Cornell University Press, 1992. Pp. Xiv, 281. $35.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 70 (3):611-614.score: 36.0
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  18. Leslie Lockett (2013). Rita Copeland and Ineke Sluiter, Eds., Medieval Grammar and Rhetoric: Language Arts and Literary Theory, AD 300–1475. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009. Pp. Xii, 972. $175. ISBN: 9780198183419. [REVIEW] Speculum 88 (1):271-274.score: 36.0
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  19. James J. Murphy (1999). AMS, 1972. Baldwin, Charles S. Medieval Rhetoric and Poetic (to 1400) Interpreted From Representative Works. New York: Macmillan, 1928. Repr. [REVIEW] Disputatio 4:127.score: 36.0
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  20. Julian Weiss (2010). Jill Ross, Figuring the Feminine: The Rhetoric of Female Embodiment in Medieval Hispanic Literature. Toronto; Buffalo, NY; and London: University of Toronto Press, 2008. Pp. Ix, 305. $75. [REVIEW] Speculum 85 (1):193-195.score: 36.0
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  21. Siegfried Wenzel (1993). Sabine Volk-Birke, Chaucer and Medieval Preaching: Rhetoric for Listeners in Sermons and Poetry.(Scriptoralia, 34.) Tübingen: Gunter Narr, 1991. Pp. 315. [REVIEW] Speculum 68 (3):903-905.score: 36.0
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  22. Jeanette M. A. Beer (1981). Narrative Conventions of Truth in the Middle Ages. Librairie Droz.score: 30.0
    ETUDES DE PHILOLOGIE 38 ETD'HISTOIRE JEANETTE MA BEER Narrative Conventions of Truth in the Middle Ages GENEVE ...
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  23. Max Lejbowicz (2013). Retour sur l'affaire Gouguenheim. Methodos 13 (13).score: 24.0
    Une invitation, reçue au début de l’automne 2011, à intervenir dans la séance du 7 mars 2012 d’un séminaire tenu à l’EHESS sur l’islamophobie, a été l’occasion de traiter de « l’affaire Gouguenheim » plus de trois ans après son irruption dans la sphère médiatique. Cette nouvelle lecture d’Aristote au Mont Saint-Michel a permis de mettre en évidence l’importance que Sylvain Gouguenheim attribue à un texte du haut Moyen Age pour suivre la diffusion de l’hellénisme dans l’Europe latine. Il s’agit (...)
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  24. M. Winterbottom (1972). Rhetoric Harry Caplan: Of Eloquence: Studies in Ancient and Mediaeval Rhetoric. Edited by Anne King and Helen North. Pp. Xiii+289. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1970. Cloth, £4·05. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 22 (03):363-364.score: 24.0
  25. E. J. Leiden, Michael Fuss, Har Gibb, Jh Kramers, Salim Kemal, Richard Kieckehefer, George D. Bond, Bk Matilal, Oxford Oxford & W. Montgomery Watt (1992). AL-AZMEH, A.(1990) Ibn Khaldun, London, Routledge. ALON, ILAI (1991) Socrates in Mediaeval Arabic Literature, Leiden, EJ Brill. BENN, CHARLES D.(1991) The Cavern Mystery Transmission, Hawaii, University of Hawaii Press. BHARADWAJA, VK (1990) Form and Validity in Indian Logic, Shimla, Indian Institute of Advanced Study. BLACK, DEBORAH L.(1990) Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Mediaeval Arabic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Asian Philosophy 2 (1):117.score: 24.0
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  26. Raul Corazzon, History of Medieval Logic: A General Overview.score: 21.0
    "The role of logic in the Middle Ages. Regarding the role of logic within the framework of arts and sciences during the Middle Ages, we have to distinguish two related aspects, one institutional and the other scientific. As to the first aspect, we have to remember that the medieval educational system was based on the seven liberal arts, which were divided into the trivium, i.e., three arts of language, and the quadrivium, i.e., four mathematical arts. The so-called trivial arts (...)
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  27. Aurélien Robert (2012). L'idée de Logique Morale aux XIIIe Et XIVe Siècles. Médiévales 63:27-45.score: 18.0
    This paper tries to understand how three medieval philosophers (Roger Bacon, Albert the Great and John Buridan) developed the idea of a special logic for ethics, taking into account Aristotle's thesis according to which ethics does not need theoretical syllogisms and uses a special kind of scientific reasoning. If rhetoric is a good candidate, we find three different readings of this approach and then three different theories of ethical reasoning.
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  28. Nielsj�Rgen Green-Pedersen (1987). The Topics in Medieval Logic. Argumentation 1 (4):407-417.score: 18.0
    The topics is a theory of argumentation based upon topoi or in Latin loci. The medieval logicians used works by Aristotle and Boethius as their sources for this doctrine, but they developed it in a rather original way. The topics became a higher-level analysis of arguments which are non-valid from a purely formal point of view, but where it is none the less legitimate to infer the conclusion from the premiss(es). In this connection the topics give rise to a (...)
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  29. Lenn Evan Goodman (2006). Avicenna. Cornell University.score: 12.0
    the philosophers in the West, none, perhaps, is better known by name and less familiar in actual content of his ideas than the medieval Muslim philosopher, physician, minister and naturalist Abu Ali Ibn Sina, known since the days of the scholastics as Avicenna. In this book the author, himself a philosopher, and long known for his studies of Arabic thought, presents a factual account of Avicenna's philosophy. Setting the thinker in the context of his often turbulent times and tracing (...)
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  30. Farshad Sadri (2010). How Early Muslim Scholars Assimilated Aristotle and Made Iran the Intellectual Center of the Islamic World: A Study of Falsafah. Edwin Mellen Press.score: 12.0
    This work demonstrates how falsafah (which linguistically refers to a group of commentaries by Muslim scholars associated with their readings of "The Corpus Aristotelicum") in Iran has been always closely linked with religion. It demonstrates that the blending of the new natural theology with Iranian culture created an intellectual climate that made Iran the center of falsafah in the Medieval world. The author begins this book by exploring the analytical arguments and methodologies presented as the subject of the first-philosophy (...)
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  31. E. Jennifer Ashworth (2007). Metaphor and the Logicians From Aristotle to Cajetan. Vivarium 45 (s 2-3):311-327.score: 12.0
    I examine the treatment of metaphor by medieval logicians and how it stemmed from their reception of classical texts in logic, grammar, and rhetoric. I consider the relation of the word 'metaphor' to the notions of translatio and transumptio, and show that it is not always synonymous with these. I also show that in the context of commentaries on the Sophistical Refutations metaphor was subsumed under equivocation. In turn, it was linked with the notion of analogy not so much (...)
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  32. Cary J. Nederman (2003). Commercial Society and Republican Government in the Latin Middle Ages: The Economic Dimensions of Brunetto Latini's Republicanism. Political Theory 31 (5):644-663.score: 12.0
    The mid-thirteenth-century theorist and rhetorician Brunetto Latini proposed a vigorous republican account of the art of government and the nature of community in his encyclopedic treatise, Li Livres dou Tresor. The interpretation of Latini's republicanism has been heavily based on its literary sensibilities, its attachment to rhetoric, and its praise for classical civic virtues. But Latini deserves to be classified as a republican insofar as he founds social and political order upon commercial principles-the production and exchange of material goods for (...)
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  33. Dale S. Wright (1993). Emancipation From What? The Concept of Freedom in Classical Ch'an Buddhism. Asian Philosophy 3 (2):113 – 124.score: 12.0
    Abstract This essay attempts to articulate an understanding of the goal of ?freedom? in classical Ch'an Buddhism by setting concerns for ?liberation? in relation to the kinds of authority and regulated structure characteristic of Sung dynasty Ch'an monasteries. It begins with the thesis that early Western interpreters of Zen have tended to emphasise the dimensions of Zen freedom that accord with modem Western versions of freedom presupposing tension between freedom and authority as well as between individual autonomy and the demands (...)
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  34. Eileen A. Joy (2013). Disturbing the Wednesday-Ish Business-as-Usual of the University Studium: A Wayzgoose Manifest. Continent 2 (4):260-268.score: 12.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  35. Tomáš Nejeschleba (2005). Lutheránský aristotelismus – Philipp Melanchthon. Studia Neoaristotelica 2 (1):67-82.score: 12.0
    De philosophia Aristotelico-Lutherana apud Philippum MelanchthonemIn hac dissertatione elementa principalia relationis Philippi Melanchthonis ad philosophiam Aristotelicam in dialectica, ethica et philosophia naturali summatimexponuntur. Quamquam Melanchthon iuvenili aetate renascentis aevi virorum doctorum mentem de litteris Graecis-Latinisque ad pristinam puritatem restaurandis secutus est, tamen doctrina eius Aristotelica nullo modo „pura“ putanda est. Imprimis eius de „notiis naturalibus“ opinio, quae magnam vim ad eius dialecticam, ethicam, de cognitione doctrinam habuit, Aristotelica haud dicenda est et Platonis potius auctoritatem redolet. Finis, quem Philippi Melanchthonis philosophia (...)
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  36. P. G. Walsh (1989). Karin M. Fredborg: The Latin Rhetorical Commentaries by Thierry of Chartres. (Studies and Texts, 84.) Pp. 403. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, 1988. Paper, Can $39.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (02):423-.score: 12.0
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  37. John M. Jeep (1997). Anna A. Grotans and David W. Porter, Eds. And Transs., The St. Gall Tractate: A Medieval Guide to Rhetorical Syntax.(Studies in German Literature, Linguistics, and Culture: Medieval Texts and Translations.) Columbia, SC: Camden House, 1995. Pp. Ix, 149; Black-and-White Frontispiece. $58.95. [REVIEW] Speculum 72 (1):158-160.score: 12.0
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  38. Mark D. Jordan (1994). The Competition of Authoritative Languages and Aquinas's Theological Rhetoric. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 4:71-90.score: 12.0
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  39. Albert L. Rossi (1989). Michael Roberts, Biblical Epic and Rhetorical Paraphrase in Late Antiquity.(ARCA Classical and Medieval Texts, Papers, and Monographs, 16.) Liverpool: Francis Cairns, 1985. Pp. X, 253.£ 20. [REVIEW] Speculum 64 (2):493-496.score: 12.0
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  40. Mary M. Paddock (2010). Rhetorical Species: A Case Study of Poetic Manifestations of Medieval Visual Culture. Speculum 85 (2):302-320.score: 12.0
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  41. Noah D. Guynn (2007). Allegory and Sexual Ethics in the High Middle Ages. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 12.0
    Guynn offers an innovative new approach to the ethical, cultural, and ideological analysis of medieval allegory. Working between poststructuralism and historical materialism, he considers both the playfulness of allegory (its openness to multiple interpretations and perspectives) and its disciplinary force (the use of rhetoric to naturalize hegemonies and suppress difference and dissent). Ultimately, he argues that both tendencies can be linked to the consolidation of power within ruling class institutions and the persecution of demonized others, notably women and sexual (...)
     
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  42. Ann Moss (1996). Printed Commonplace-Books and the Structuring of Renaissance Thought. Clarendon Press.score: 12.0
    This is the first comprehensive study of the Renaissance commonplace-book. -/- Commonplace-books were the information-organizers of Early Modern Europe, notebooks of quotations methodically arranged for easy retrieval. From their first introduction to the rudiments of Latin to the specialized studies of leisure reading of their later years, the pupils of humanist schools were trained to use commonplace-books, which formed an immensely important element of Renaissance education. The common-place book mapped and resourced Renaissance culture's moral thinking, its accepted strategies of argumentation, (...)
     
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  43. Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.score: 12.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida “Passages—from (...)
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  44. J. Bos (2009). The Rise and Decline of Character: Humoral Psychology in Ancient and Early Modern Medical Theory. History of the Human Sciences 22 (3):29-50.score: 9.0
    Humoralism, the view that the human body is composed of a limited number of elementary fluids, is one of the most characteristic aspects of ancient medicine. The psychological dimension of humoral theory in the ancient world has thus far received a relatively small amount of scholarly attention. Medical psychology in the ancient world can only be correctly understood by relating it to psychological thought in other fields, such as ethics and rhetoric. The concept that ties these various domains together is (...)
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  45. Richard J. Schoeck (1968). On Rhetoric in Fourteenth Century Oxford. Mediaeval Studies 30 (1):214-225.score: 8.0
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  46. Sergey Dolgopolski (2012). Who Thinks in the Talmud? Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 20 (1):1-34.score: 4.0
    Abstract This article traces a historical shift, and in particular its erasure from memory on the intellectual map of the West, in concepts of subjectivity across practices of rabbinic thinking in late antiquity, medieval interpretations of the Talmud, and modern talmudic scholarship. I first introduce a comparative perspective that relies on a mutual hermeneutics of philosophical and talmudic traditions. I consequently engage with Alain de Libera's archaeological analysis of the birth of the thinking subject in medieval philosophy and (...)
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  47. Eddo Rigotti (2014). The Nature and Functions of Loci in Agricola's De Inuentione Dialectica. Argumentation 28 (1):19-37.score: 4.0
    This paper aims to single out and to highlight the fundamental tenets of Agricola’s De inuentione dialectica. After the structure of the volume, its theoretical perspective and its educational concern are illustrated, Agricola’s understanding of the fundamental notion of locus is expounded. In this relation his particular use of the medieval term habitudo and the exclusion of maxims, which had been the main concern of the Medieval doctrine of loci, show a certain distance from the Medieval tradition. (...)
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  48. Robin Attfield (2009). Social History, Religion, and Technology. Environmental Ethics 31 (1):31-50.score: 4.0
    An interdisciplinary reappraisal of Lynn White, Jr.’s “The Historical Roots of Our Ecologic Crisis” reopens several issues, including the suggestion by Peter Harrison that White’s thesis was historical and that it is a mistake to regard it as theological. It also facilitates a comparison between “Roots” and White’s earlier book Medieval Technology and Social Change. In “Roots,” White discarded or de-emphasized numerous qualifications and nuances present in his earlier work so as to heighten the effect of certain rhetorical aphorisms (...)
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  49. Timothy F. Bellamah (2011). The Biblical Interpretation of William of Alton. OUP USA.score: 4.0
    Studies of medieval Biblical interpretation usually focus on the printed literature, neglecting the vast majority of relevant works. Timothy Bellamah offers a groundbreaking examination of the exegesis of William of Alton, a thirteenth-century Dominican regent master at Paris whose commentaries have never previously appeared in print. As a near contemporary of Hugh of St. Cher, Bonaventure, Albert the Great, and Thomas Aquinas, William was an important representative of university exegesis at a time of rapidly changing methods and remarkable intellectual (...)
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  50. Barbara Obrist (2012). Visual Representation and Science Visual Figures of the Universe Between Antiquity and the Early Thirteenth Century. Spontaneous Generations 6 (1):15-23.score: 4.0
    The paper raises the question of the function of visual representations in medieval cosmographical texts. It proposes to view diverse functions of figures in relation to changing discursive environments, including differing philosophical positions and changing social and intellectual contexts. It further suggests a distinction between figures that were elaborated within the highly specialized disciplines of mathematics and philosophy of nature in Greek Antiquity and figures that were instrumental in transmitting accepted world models, thus avoiding the opposition between scientific and (...)
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