Search results for 'Rhetorics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Charles Marsh (2001). Public Relations Ethics: Contrasting Models From the Rhetorics of Plato, Aristotle, and Isocrates. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 16 (2-3):78-98.score: 12.0
    As a relatively young profession, public relations seeks a realistic ethics foundation. A continuing debate in public relations has pitted journalistic/objectivity ethics against the advocacy ethics that may be more appropriate in an adversarial society. As the journalistic/objectivity influence has waned, the debate has evolved, pitting the advocacy/adversarial foundation against the two-way symmetrical model of public relations, which seeks to build consensus and holds that an organization itself, not an opposing public, sometimes may need to change to build a productive (...)
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  2. Charles W. Marsh Jr (2001). Public Relations Ethics: Contrasting Models From the Rhetorics of Plato, Aristotle, and Isocrates. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 16 (2 & 3):78 – 98.score: 12.0
    As a relatively young profession, public relations seeks a realistic ethics foundation. A continuing debate in public relations has pitted journalistic/objectivity ethics against the advocacy ethics that may be more appropriate in an adversarial society. As the journalistic/objectivity influence has waned, the debate has evolved, pitting the advocacy/adversarial foundation against the two-way symmetrical model of public relations, which seeks to build consensus and holds that an organization itself, not an opposing public, sometimes may need to change to build a productive (...)
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  3. Lois Peters Agnew (2008). Outward, Visible Propriety: Stoic Philosophy and Eighteenth-Century British Rhetorics. University of South Carolina Press.score: 12.0
    Introduction -- Stoic ethics and rhetoric -- Eighteenth-century common sense and sensus communis -- Taste and sensus communis -- Propriety, sympathy, and style fusing individual and social -- Victorian language theories and the decline of sensus communis.
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  4. Barbara Cassin Andrew Goffey (2009). Sophistics, Rhetorics, and Performance; or, How to Really Do Things with Words. Philosophy and Rhetoric 42 (4):pp. 349-372.score: 10.0
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  5. Barbara Cassin & Andrew Goffey (2009). Sophistics, Rhetorics, and Performance; or, How to Really Do Things with Words. Philosophy and Rhetoric 42 (4):349 - 372.score: 10.0
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  6. Diane Davis (2011). Creaturely rhetorics. Philosophy and Rhetoric 44 (1):88-94.score: 10.0
    In a 1917 essay entitled “A Difficulty in the Path of Psychoanalysis,” Freud suggests that modern science has dealt three devastating blows to human pride: the Copernican revelation that the earth revolves around the sun, decentering man’s presumed cosmological place in the universe as “lord of the world”; the Darwinian revelation that man shares a common ancestor with apes, which indicates that he is not inherently “a being different from animals or superior to them”; and the Freudian revelation that consciousness (...)
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  7. Gregor McLennan (1998). Sociology and Cultural Studies: Rhetorics of Disciplinary Identity. History of the Human Sciences 11 (3):1-17.score: 10.0
    This article explores the interface between cultural studies and soci ology, as expressed through four scenarios which construe the 'debate' in particular ways. Two of these - 'cultural studies succession' and 'postmodernist conjuncturalist cultural studies' - unapologetically seek to dismiss sociology in favour of cultural studies, whilst a third - 'socio logical revenge' - appears to turn the tables entirely. A fourth and more productive scenario dwells synthetically on the 'cultural turn' across the whole 'field' of the social and human (...)
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  8. Rui Santiago & Teresa Carvalho (2012). Managerialism Rhetorics in Portuguese Higher Education. Minerva 50 (4):511-532.score: 10.0
    In Portugal, as elsewhere, the rhetoric of managerialism in higher education is becoming firmly entrenched in the governmental policymakers’ discourse and has been widely disseminated across the institutional landscape. Managerialism is an important ideological support of New Public Management policies and can be classified as a narrative of strategic change. In this paper, we analyse how far the managerialism narrative has been injected into the discursive repertory of Portuguese academics in their role as the co-ordinators of the higher education institutions’ (...)
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  9. Louis Marin (1990). Rhetorics of Truth, Justice and Secrecy in Pascal's Text. Argumentation 4 (1):69-84.score: 10.0
    Beginning from a definition of philosophical discourse which states the necessity of rhetoric meant as the whole of the linguistic devices aiming to persuade the interlocutor of truth and justice, the author points out that Pascal's text would be an outstanding example of such a discourse, while showing, nevertheless, the specificity of the rhetoric he employs. Such a specificity would aim to carry out a complex logic of the secret, concerning chiefly the ackowledgement and identification procedures of the subject of (...)
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  10. Andrea A. Lunsford, Kirt H. Wilson & Rosa A. Eberly (2009). Introduction: Rhetorics and Roadmaps. In A. Lunsford, K. Wilson & R. Eberly (eds.), Sage Handbook of Rhetorical Studies. Sage.score: 10.0
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  11. Transnational Feminist Solidarities (2012). Vandana shiVa and the RhetoRics oF biodiVeRsity. In Elizabeth A. Flynn, Patricia J. Sotirin & Ann P. Brady (eds.), Feminist Rhetorical Resilience. Utah State University Press.score: 10.0
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  12. Harro van Lente & Arie Rip (1992). Some Rhetorics Are More Equal Than Others. Social Epistemology 6 (2):175 – 178.score: 9.0
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  13. Stephanie Jed (2001). Proof and Transnational Rhetorics: Opening Up the Conversation. History and Theory 40 (3):372–384.score: 9.0
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  14. Luc J. Wintgens (1993). Rhetoric, Reasonableness and Ethics: An Essay on Perelman. [REVIEW] Argumentation 7 (4):451-460.score: 9.0
    The article deals with an interpretation of the work of Ch. Perelman. The author tries to determine the meaning of reasonableness in a hermeneutical and anthropological perspective. He then places the work of Perelman in the light of the theory of symbolic interactionism of G.H. Mead.
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  15. Patricia Malesh (2010). The Battle Within : Understanding the Persuasive Affect of Internal Rhetorics in the Ethical Vegetarian/Vegan Movement. In Greg Goodale & Jason Edward Black (eds.), Arguments About Animal Ethics. Lexington Books.score: 9.0
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  16. Robert Sparrow (2007). Revolutionary and Familiar, Inevitable and Precarious: Rhetorical Contradictions in Enthusiasm for Nanotechnology. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 1 (1):57-68.score: 8.0
    This paper analyses rhetorics of scientific and corporate enthusiasm surrounding nanotechnology. I argue that enthusiasts for nanotechnologies often try to have it both ways on questions concerning the nature and possible impact of these technologies, and the inevitability of their development and use. In arguments about their nature and impact we are simultaneously informed that these are revolutionary technologies with the potential to profoundly change the world and that they merely represent the extension of existing technologies. They are revolutionary (...)
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  17. Jeffrey A. Bennett (2013). Troubled Interventions: Public Policy, Vectors of Disease, and the Rhetoric of Diabetes Management. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 34 (1):15-32.score: 8.0
    This essay examines the debate surrounding New York City’s controversial diabetes registry program. Exploring the tensions between public health officials and privacy advocates, the article explores how diabetes is imagined in the public sphere. Although rhetorics underscoring privacy may seem the more progressive discourse, I argue New York City’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has the more forward-looking plan, attempting to reconstitute diabetes not as a chronic condition necessitating individual management but as a disease that requires systemic intervention.
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  18. Marianne Janack & John Charles Adams (1999). Feminist Epistemologies, Rhetorical Traditions, and the Ad Hominem. In Christine Mason Sutherland & Rebecca Sutcliffe (eds.), The Changing Tradition: Women in the History of Rhetoric. University of Calgary Press.score: 6.0
  19. Anne Sheppard (2008). Rhetoric, Drama and Truth in Plato's Symposium. International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 2 (1):28-40.score: 6.0
    This paper draws attention to the Symposium's concern with epideictic rhetoric. It argues that in the Symposium, as in the Gorgias and the Phaedrus, a contrast is drawn between true and false rhetoric. The paper also discusses the dialogue's relationship to drama. Whereas both epideictic rhetoric and drama were directed to a mass audience, the speeches in the Symposium are delivered to a small, select group. The discussion focuses on the style of the speeches delivered by Aristophanes, Agathon, Socrates and (...)
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  20. Anthony A. Derksen (2005). Dennett's Rhetorical Strategies in Consciousness Explained. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 36 (1):29-48.score: 6.0
    Dennett's "Consciousness Explained" (1991) is an inspiring but also a highly frustrating book. The line of the argument seems to be clear, but then at second sight it fades away. It turns out that Dennett uses six of the seven strategies which I discuss in my 'The Seven Strategies of the Sophisticated Pseudo-Scientist: A Look into Freud's Rhetorical Tool Box' (J. Gen. Phil. Sci., 2001) Discussing important examples of these strategies I show why "Consciousness Explained" is such a frustrating book. (...)
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  21. Marina McCoy (2008). Plato on the Rhetoric of Philosophers and Sophists. Cambridge University Press.score: 6.0
    In this book, Marina McCoy explores Plato’s treatment of the rhetoric of philosophers and sophists through a thematic treatment of six different Platonic dialogues, including Apology, Protagoras, Gorgias, Republic, Sophist, and Phaedras. She argues that Plato presents the philosopher and the sophist as difficult to distinguish, insofar as both use rhetoric as part of their arguments. Plato does not present philosophy as rhetoric-free, but rather shows that rhetoric is an integral part of the practice of philosophy.
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  22. John O'Neill (2002). The Rhetoric of Deliberation: Some Problems in Kantian Theories of Deliberative Democracy. Res Publica 8 (3):249-268.score: 6.0
    Deliberative or discursive models of democracy have recently enjoyed a revival in both political theory and policy practice. Against the picture of democracy as a procedure for aggregating and effectively meeting the given preference of individuals, deliberative theory offers a model of democracy as a forum through which judgements and preferences are formed and altered through reasoned dialogue between free and equal citizens. Much in the recent revival of deliberative democracy, especially that which comes through Habermas and Rawls, has Kantian (...)
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  23. Athony A. Derksen (2001). The Seven Strategies of the Sophisticated Pseudo-Scientist: A Look Into Freud's Rhetorical Tool Box. [REVIEW] Journal for General Philosophy of Science 32 (2):329-350.score: 6.0
    In my ‘Seven Sins of Pseudo-Science’ (Journal for General Philosophy of Science 1993) I argued against Grünbaum that Freud commits all Seven Sins of Pseudo-Science. Yet how does Freud manage to fool many people, including such a sophisticated person as Grünbaum? My answer is that Freud is a sophisticated pseudo-scientist, using all Seven Strategies of the Sophisticated Pseudo-Scientist to keep up appearances, to wit, (1) the Humble Empiricist, (2) the Severe Selfcriticism, (3) the Unbiased Me, (4) the Striking but Irrelevant (...)
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  24. Samuel IJsseling (1976). Rhetoric and Philosophy in Conflict: An Historical Survey. M. Nijhoff.score: 6.0
    I THE REHABILITATION OF RHETORIC The ancients denned rhetoric as the art of speaking and writing both well and convincingly: ars bene dicendi and ars ...
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  25. Steve Fuller (2004). Philosophy, Rhetoric, and the End of Knowledge: A New Beginning for Science and Technology Studies. Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.score: 6.0
    This volume explores Science & Technology Studies (STS) and its role in redrawing disciplinary boundaries. For scholars/grad students in rhetoric of science, science studies, philosophy & comm, English, sociology & knowledge mgmt.
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  26. M. Azar (1999). Argumentative Text as Rhetorical Structure: An Application of Rhetorical Structure Theory. [REVIEW] Argumentation 13 (1):97-114.score: 6.0
    Rhetorical Structure Theory (RST), as a tool for analyzing written texts, is particularly appropriate for analyzing argumentative texts. The distinction that RST makes between the part of a text that realizes the primary goal of the writer, termed nucleus, and the part that provides supplementary material, termed satellite, is crucial for the analysis of argumentative texts.
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  27. Jamie Dow (2007). A Supposed Contradiction About Emotion-Arousal in Aristotle's "Rhetoric". Phronesis 52 (4):382 - 402.score: 6.0
    Aristotle, in the Rhetoric, appears to claim both that emotion-arousal has no place in the essential core of rhetorical expertise and that it has an extremely important place as one of three technical kinds of proof. This paper offers an account of how this apparent contradiction can be resolved. The resolution stems from a new understanding of what Rhetoric I. I refers to - not emotions, but set-piece rhetorical devices aimed at manipulating emotions, which do not depend on the facts (...)
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  28. Seth Benardete (1991). The Rhetoric of Morality and Philosophy: Plato's Gorgias and Phaedrus. University of Chicago Press.score: 6.0
    Benardete here interprets and, for the first time, pairs two important Platonic dialogues, the Gorgias and the Phaedrus . In linking these dialogues, he places Socrates' notion of rhetoric in a new light and illuminates the way in which Plato gives morality and eros a place in the human soul.
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  29. Nancy Green (2010). Representation of Argumentation in Text with Rhetorical Structure Theory. Argumentation 24 (2):181-196.score: 6.0
    Various argumentation analysis tools permit the analyst to represent functional components of an argument (e.g., data, claim, warrant, backing), how arguments are composed of subarguments and defenses against potential counterarguments, and argumentation schemes. In order to facilitate a study of argument presentation in a biomedical corpus, we have developed a hybrid scheme that enables an analyst to encode argumentation analysis within the framework of Rhetorical Structure Theory (RST), which can be used to represent the discourse structure of a text. This (...)
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  30. Nicholas Rescher (1998). The Role of Rhetoric in Rational Argumentation. Argumentation 12 (2):315-323.score: 6.0
    The structure of this discussion will be tripartite. First it will set out a way of distinguishing between rhetoric and strictly rational argumentation. Next it will consider some of the ramifications of this proposed way of looking at the matter – in particular what its implications are for rationality and for rhetoric, respectively. Finally it examines how this perspective bears on the project of philosophizing. The paper's ultimate aim, accordingly, is to consider what light such an analysis can shed upon (...)
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  31. Lawrence Souder (2010). A Rhetorical Analysis of Apologies for Scientific Misconduct: Do They Really Mean It? Science and Engineering Ethics 16 (1):175-184.score: 6.0
    Since published acknowledgements of scientific misconduct are a species of image restoration, common strategies for responding publicly to accusations can be expected: from sincere apologies to ritualistic apologies. This study is a rhetorical examination of these strategies as they are reflected in choices in language: it compares the published retractions and letters of apology with the letters that charge misconduct. The letters are examined for any shifts in language between the charge of misconduct and the response to the charge in (...)
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  32. Benjamin Balak (2006). Mccloskey's Rhetoric: Discourse Ethics in Economics. Routledge.score: 6.0
    Deirdre McCloskey is rightly one of the most recognizable names in economics. She views economics as a language that uses all the rhetorical devices of everyday conversation and therefore it should be judged by aesthetic and literary standards and not the criteria of mathematical rigor that is espoused by the mainstream. This controversial standpoint has been hugely influential and this examination of the methodological and philosophical consequences of her work is overdue, and very welcome.
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  33. Stephen Bygrave (1993). Kenneth Burke: Rhetoric and Ideology. Routledge.score: 6.0
    In a career of over seventy years, Kenneth Burke has produced a body of challenging and fascinating theoretical work. This work has had a bigger reputation than it has had a readership. Burke has been hailed not only as a strong precursor of the work of Fredric Jameson, Frank Lentriccia, and others, but also as a powerful original thinker whose writings have yet to be grappled with. Kenneth Burke: Rhetoric and Ideology is a lucid and accessible introduction to a major (...)
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  34. Michael Leff (2000). Rhetoric and Dialectic in the Twenty-First Century. Argumentation 14 (3):241-254.score: 6.0
    The paper presents a historical overview of some characteristic differences between rhetoric and dialectic in the pre-modern tradition. In the light of this historical analysis, some current approaches to dialectic are characterized, with special attention to Ralph Johnson's concept of dialectical tier.
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  35. Ernesto Grassi (1980/2001). Rhetoric as Philosophy: The Humanist Tradition. Southern Illinois University Press.score: 6.0
    Originally published in English in 1980, Rhetoric as Philosophy has been out of print for some time. The reviews of that English edition attest to the importance of Ernesto Grassi’s work. By going back to the Italian humanist tradition and aspects of earlier Greek and Latin thought, Ernesto Grassi develops a conception of rhetoric as the basis of philosophy. Grassi explores the sense in which the first principles of rational thought come from the metaphorical power of the word. He finds (...)
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  36. Paul Hernadi (ed.) (1989). The Rhetoric of Interpretation and the Interpretation of Rhetoric. Duke University Press.score: 6.0
    The Rhetoric of Interpretation Hayden White Contemporary thought about the nature of interpretation, especially in the human and social sciences, ...
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  37. Lisa Keränen (2001). The Hippocratic Oath as Epideictic Rhetoric: Reanimating Medicine's Past for Its Future. Journal of Medical Humanities 22 (1):55-68.score: 6.0
    As an example of Aristotle's genre of epideictic, or ceremonial rhetoric, the Hippocratic Oath has the capacity to persuade its self-addressing audience to appreciate the value of the medical profession by lending an element of stability to the shifting ethos of health care. However, the values it celebrates do not accurately capture communally shared norms about contemporary medical practice. Its multiple and sometimes conflicting versions, anachronistic references, and injunctions that resist translation into specific conduct diminish its longer-term persuasive force. Only (...)
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  38. Frans H. van Eemeren & Peter Houtlosser (2000). Rhetorical Analysis Within a Pragma-Dialectical Framework. Argumentation 14 (3):293-305.score: 6.0
    The paper reacts against the strict separation between dialectical and rhetorical approaches to argumentation and argues that argumentative discourse can be analyzed and evaluated more adequately if the two are systematically combined. Such an integrated approach makes it possible to show how the opportunities available in each of the dialectical stages of a critical discussion have been used strategically to further the rhetorical aims of the speaker or writer. The approach is illustrated with the help of an analysis of an (...)
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  39. Richard A. Cherwitz (ed.) (1990). Rhetoric and Philosophy. L. Erlbaum Associates.score: 6.0
    This important volume explores alternative ways in which those involved in the field of speech communication have attempted to find a philosophical grounding for rhetoric. Recognizing that rhetoric can be supported in a wide variety of ways, this text examines eight different philosophies of rhetoric: realism, relativism, rationalism, idealism, materialism, existentialism, deconstructionism, and pragmatism. The value of this book lies in its pluralistic and comparative approach to rhetorical theory. Although rhetoric may be the more difficult road to philosophy, the fact (...)
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  40. Mark D. Johnston (1996). The Evangelical Rhetoric of Ramon Llull: Lay Learning and Piety in the Christian West Around 1300. Oxford University Press.score: 6.0
    Ramon Llull (1232-1316), born on Majorca, was one of the most remarkable lay intellectuals of the thirteenth century. He devoted much of his life to promoting missions among unbelievers, the reform of Western Christian society, and personal spiritual perfection. He wrote over 200 philosophical and theological works in Catalan, Latin, and Arabic. Many of these expound on his "Great Universal Art of Finding Truth," an idiosyncratic dialectical system that he thought capable of proving Catholic beliefs to non-believers. This study offers (...)
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  41. Carlo Natali (2007). Rhetorical and Scientific Aspects of the Nicomachean Ethics. Phronesis 52 (4):364-381.score: 6.0
    There are fields of research on NE which still need attention: the edition of the text the style and rhetorical and logical instruments employed by Aristotle in setting out his position. After indicating the situation of the research on the text of NE, I describe some rhetorical devices used by Aristotle in his work: the presence of a preamble, clues about how the argument will be developed, a tendency to introduce new arguments in an inconspicuous way and the articulation of (...)
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  42. J. David Hester (2004). Intersex(Es) and Informed Consent: How Physicians' Rhetoric Constrains Choice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (1):21-49.score: 6.0
    When a child is born with ambiguousgenitalia it is declared a psychosocialemergency, and the policy first proposed byJohn Money (Johns Hopkins University) andadapted by the American Academy of Pediatrics(and more broadly accepted in Canada, the U.K.,and Europe) requires determination ofunderlying condition(s), selection of gender,surgical intervention, and a commitment by allparties to accept the ``real sex'' of thepatient, all no later than 18–24 months,preferably earlier. Ethicists have recentlyquestioned this protocol on several grounds:lack of medical necessity, violation ofinformed consent, uncertainty of (...)
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  43. Amélie Rorty (2011). Aristotle on the Virtues of Rhetoric. Review of Metaphysics 64 (4):715-733.score: 6.0
    Aristotle’s phronimos is a model of the virtues: he fuses sound practical reasoning with well formed desires. Among the skills of practical reasoning are those of finding the right words and arguments in the process of deliberation. As Aristotle puts it, virtue involves doing the right thing at the right time and for the right reason. Speaking well, saying the right thing in the right way is not limited to public oratory: it pervades practical life. Aristotle’s phronimos must acquire the (...)
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  44. Louis L. Bucciarelli (2009). The Epistemic Implications of Engineering Rhetoric. Synthese 168 (3):333 - 356.score: 6.0
    The texts (and talk) of engineers take different forms. In this essay, I present and critique several texts written for different purposes and audiences but all intended to convey to the reader the technical details of whatever they are about—whether a textbook passage describing the fundamental behavior of an electrical component, a journal article about a mathematical technique intended for use in design optimization, a memo to co-workers within a firm about a heat transfer analysis of a remotely sited building, (...)
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  45. M. Burke (2008). Advertising Aristotle: A Preliminary Investigation Into the Contemporary Relevance of Aristotle's Art of Rhetoric. [REVIEW] Foundations of Science 13 (3-4):295-305.score: 6.0
    In this article, a preliminary investigation will be conducted in order to try to discover whether or not Aristotle’s the Art of Rhetoric can have any relevance as a handbook for the rhetoricians of the twenty-first century and in particular for advertising designers. First, the background against which this question is posed will be set out. Second, the chosen methodology will be explained. Thereafter, some qualitative data will be presented and discussed. Finally, some conclusions will be drawn suggesting that The (...)
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  46. Johanna Hartelius (2011). Rhetorics of Expertise. Social Epistemology 25 (3):211 - 215.score: 6.0
    Social Epistemology, Volume 25, Issue 3, Page 211-215, July 2011.
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  47. Devin Stauffer (2006). The Unity of Plato's Gorgias: Rhetoric, Justice, and the Philosophic Life. Cambridge University Press.score: 6.0
    Devin Stauffer demonstrates the complex unity of Plato's Gorgias, through a careful analysis of the dialogue's three main sections, including Socrates' famous argumentative duel with Callicles, a passionate critic of justice and philosophy. He reveals how the seemingly disparate themes of rhetoric, justice, and the philosophic life are woven together into a coherent whole. Stauffer's interpretation of the Gorgias sheds new light on Plato's thought, indicating that Plato and Socrates had a more favorable view of rhetoric than is supposed, and (...)
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  48. Scott Jacobs (2000). Rhetoric and Dialectic From the Standpoint of Normative Pragmatics. Argumentation 14 (3):261-286.score: 6.0
    Normative pragmatics can bridge the differences between dialectical and rhetorical theories in a way that saves the central insights of both. Normative pragmatics calls attention to how the manifest strategic design of a message produces interpretive effects and interactional consequences. Argumentative analysis of messages should begin with the manifest persuasive rationale they communicate. But not all persuasive inducements should be treated as arguments. Arguments express with a special pragmatic force propositions where those propositions stand in particular inferential relations to one (...)
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  49. Peter Walmsley (1990). The Rhetoric of Berkeley's Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 6.0
    Whereas previous studies have made George Berkeley (1685-1753) the object of philosophical study, Peter Walmsley assesses Berkeley as a writer, offering rhetorical and literary analyses of Berkeley's four major philosophical texts, A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous, Alciphron, and Siris. Berkeley emerges from this study as an accomplished stylist who builds structures of affective imagery, creates dramatic voices in his texts, and masters the range of philosophical genres--the treatise, the dialogue, and the (...)
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