Search results for 'Rhys McKinnon' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Catriona McKinnon (2002). Liberalism and the Defence of Political Constructivism. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 60.0
    Contemporary liberal political justification is often accused of preaching to the converted: liberal principles are acceptable only to people already committed to liberal values. Catriona McKinnon addresses this important criticism by arguing that self-respect and its social conditions should be placed at the heart of the liberal approach to justification. A commitment to self-respect delivers a commitment to the liberal values of toleration and public reason, but self-respect itself is not an exclusively liberal value.
     
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  2. Catriona McKinnon (2006). Toleration: A Critical Introduction. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Why should we be tolerant? What does it mean to ‘live and let live’? What ought to be tolerated and what not? Catriona McKinnon presents a comprehensive, yet accessible introduction to toleration in her new book. Divided into two parts, the first clearly introduces and assesses the major theoretical accounts of toleration, examining it in light of challenges from scepticism, value pluralism and reasonableness. The second part applies the theories of toleration to contemporary debates such as female circumcision, French (...)
     
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  3. N. McKinnon (2002). The Endurance/Perdurance Distinction. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (3):288 – 306.score: 30.0
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  4. Neil McKinnon & John Bigelow (2012). Presentism, and Speaking of the Dead. Philosophical Studies 160 (2):253-263.score: 30.0
    Presentists standardly conform to the eternalist’s paradigm of treating all cases of property-exemplification as involving a single relation of instantiation. This, we argue, results in a much less parsimonious and philosophically explanatory picture than is possible if other alternatives are considered. We argue that by committing to primitive past and future tensed instantiation ties, presentists can make gains in both economy and explanatory power. We show how this metaphysical picture plays out in cases where an individual exists to partake in (...)
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  5. Neil McKinnon (2003). Presentism and Consciousness. Australian Journal of Philosophy 81 (3):305-323.score: 30.0
    The presentist view of time is psychologically appealing. I argue that, ironically, contingent facts about the temporal properties of consciousness are very difficult to square with presentism unless some form of mind/body dualism is embraced.
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  6. Neil McKinnon (1999). The Hybrid Theory of Time. Philosophical Papers 28 (1):37-53.score: 30.0
    Time passes; sometimes swiftly, sometimes interminably, but always it passes. We see the world change as events emerge from the shroud of the future, clandestinely slinking into the past almost immediately as though they are reluctant to meet our gaze: children are born, old friends and relatives die, governments once full of youthful enthusiasm wane. If the Earth were sentient, it might feel itself being torn apart as tectonic plates diverge, and chuckle as it outlived species upon species of transient (...)
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  7. Neil McKinnon & John C. Bigelow (2001). Parfit, Causation, and Survival. Philosophia 28 (1-4):467-476.score: 30.0
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  8. Neil McKinnon (2008). A New Problem of the Many. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (230):80-97.score: 30.0
    Peter Unger's 'problem of the many' has elicited many responses over the past quarter of a century. Here I present a new problem of the many. This new problem, I claim, is resistant to the solutions cunently on offer for Unger's problem.
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  9. Rachel McKinnon (2011). Lotteries, Knowledge, and Practical Reasoning. Logos and Episteme 2 (2):225-231.score: 30.0
    This paper addresses an argument offered by John Hawthorne gainst the propriety of an agent’s using propositions she does not know as premises in practical reasoning. I will argue that there are a number of potential structural confounds in Hawthorne’s use of his main example, a case of practical reasoning about a lottery. By drawing these confounds out more explicitly, we can get a better sense of how to make appropriate use of such examples in theorizing about norms, knowledge, and (...)
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  10. Catriona Mckinnon (2007). Should We Tolerate Holocaust Denial? Res Publica 13 (1):9-28.score: 30.0
    Holocaust denial (HD) is the activity of denying the occurrence of key events and processes which constitute the Holocaust. Should it be tolerated? HD brings into particularly sharp focus many difficult questions faced by defenders of content-neutral liberal principles protecting freedom of expression. I argue that there are insufficient grounds for the legal prohibition of HD, but that society has the right and the duty to expel and exclude deniers from the Academy.
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  11. Catriona McKinnon (2009). Runaway Climate Change: A Justice-Based Case for Precautions. Journal of Social Philosophy 40 (2):187-203.score: 30.0
  12. Dario Castiglione & Catriona McKinnon (2001). Introduction: Beyond Toleration? Res Publica 7 (3):223-230.score: 30.0
    Although tolerance is widely regarded as a virtue of both individuals and groups that modern democratic and multiculturalist societies cannot do without, there is still much disagreement among political thinkers as to what tolerance demands, or what can be done to create and sustain a culture of tolerance. The philosophical literature on toleration contains three main strands. (1) An agreement that a tolerant society is more than a modus vivendi; (2) discussion of the proper object(s) of toleration; (3) debate about (...)
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  13. Rachel McKinnon, Reasonable Assertions: On Norms of Assertion and Why You Don't Need to Know What You're Talking About.score: 30.0
    There’s a widespread conviction in the norms of assertion literature that an agent’s asserting something false merits criticism. As Williamson puts it, asserting something false is likened to cheating at the game of assertion. Most writers on the topic have consequently proposed factive norms of assertion – ones on which truth is a necessary condition for the proper performance of an assertion. However, I argue that this view is mistaken. I suggest that we can illuminate the error by introducing a (...)
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  14. Neil McKinnon, Intrinsicness, Duplication and Relations to Times.score: 30.0
    The principal aim of this paper is to defend a certain view about temporary properties from an important objection to that view. More specifically, I will be defending the view that ostensible temporary intrinsic properties are really relations between the things that have those properties and times. The objection is, roughly speaking, that by construing ostensible temporary intrinsics as relations to times, persisting things are impoverished, being clothed only by their essential (and perhaps also their permanent) intrinsic properties. The worry (...)
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  15. Neil McKinnon (2002). Supervaluations and the Problem of the Many. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (208):320-339.score: 30.0
    Supervaluational treatments of vagueness are currently quite popular among those who regard vagueness as a thoroughly semantic phenomenon. Peter Unger's 'problem of the many' may be regarded as arising from the vagueness of our ordinary physical-object terms, so it is not surprising that supervaluational solutions to Unger's problem have been offered. I argue that supervaluations do not afford an adequate solution to the problem of the many. Moreover, the considerations I raise against the supervaluational solution tell also against the solution (...)
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  16. Christine Mckinnon (2005). Hypocrisy, Cheating, and Character Possession. Journal of Value Inquiry 39 (3-4):399-414.score: 30.0
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  17. Rachel McKinnon & John Turri (2013). Irksome Assertions. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):123-128.score: 30.0
    The Knowledge Account of Assertion (KAA) says that knowledge is the norm of assertion: you may assert a proposition only if you know that it’s true. The primary support for KAA is an explanatory inference from a broad range of linguistic data. The more data that KAA well explains, the stronger the case for it, and the more difficult it is for the competition to keep pace. In this paper we critically assess a purported new linguistic datum, which, it has (...)
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  18. Catriona Mckinnon (2003). Basic Income, Self-Respect and Reciprocity. Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (2):143–158.score: 30.0
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  19. Catriona McKinnon (2007). Democracy, Equality and Toleration. Journal of Ethics 11 (2):125 - 146.score: 30.0
    In this paper I comment on a recent “letter” by Burleigh Wilkins addressed to nascent egalitarian democracies which offers advice on the achievement of religious toleration. I argue that while Wilkins’ advice is sound as far as it goes, it is nevertheless underdeveloped insofar as his letter fails to distinguish two competing conceptions of toleration – liberal-pluralist and republican-secularist – both of which are consistent with the advice he offers, but each of which yields very different policy recommendations (as can (...)
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  20. Rachel McKinnon (2012). How Do You Know That 'How Do You Know?' Challenges a Speaker's Knowledge? Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 93 (1):65-83.score: 30.0
    It is often argued that the general propriety of challenging an assertion with ‘How do you know?’ counts as evidence for the Knowledge Norm of Assertion (KNA). Part of the argument is that this challenge seems to directly challenge whether a speaker knows what she asserts. In this article I argue for a re-interpretation of the data, the upshot of which is that we need not interpret ‘How do you know?’ as directly challenging a speaker's knowledge; instead, it's better understood (...)
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  21. Rachel McKinnon (2013). Lotteries, Knowledge, and Irrelevant Alternatives. Dialogue 52 (3):523-549.score: 30.0
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  22. Neil McKinnon, Persistence and a New Problem of the Many.score: 30.0
    One winter’s Saturday Clarence wakes up. He realises he has left his umbrella at work. The office is locked, and he can’t get in. Being one of those people who punish themselves for their mistakes, he can’t bring himself to buy a replacement. He has an engagement six kilometres down the road and starts wondering whether it will rain. Normally, this would not be a problem, but his motor vehicle has broken down because he forgot to have it serviced. And (...)
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  23. Rachel Mckinnon (2014). Stereotype Threat and Attributional Ambiguity for Trans Women. Hypatia 29 (1):857-872.score: 30.0
    In this paper I discuss the interrelated topics of stereotype threat and attributional ambiguity as they relate to gender and gender identity. The former has become an emerging topic in feminist philosophy and has spawned a tremendous amount of research in social psychology and elsewhere. But the discussion, at least in how it connects to gender, is incomplete: the focus is only on cisgender women and their experiences. By considering trans women's experiences of stereotype threat and attributional ambiguity, we gain (...)
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  24. Rachel McKinnon (2012). What I Learned in the Lunch Room About Assertion and Practical Reasoning. Logos and Episteme 3 (4):565-569.score: 30.0
    It is increasingly argued that there is a single unified constitutive norm of both assertion and practical reasoning. The most common suggestion is that knowledge is this norm. If this is correct, then we would expect that a diagnosis of problematic assertions should manifest as problematic reasons for acting. Jennifer Lackey has recently argued that assertions epistemically grounded in isolated second-hand knowledge (ISHK) are unwarranted. I argue that decisions epistemically grounded in premises based on ISHK also seem inappropriate. I finish (...)
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  25. C. McKinnon (2011). This is Ethical Theory * by Jan Narveson. Analysis 71 (2):397-399.score: 30.0
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  26. Neil McKinnon, Time and Temporal Attitude Asymmetries.score: 30.0
    (1) Certain of our intentional attitudes appear to have time-asymmetric manifestation conditions. For instance, we dread a certain painful episode only if (we believe) it is future and feel relief about that episode only when (we believe) it is past. We eagerly anticipate events only when they are future and regard them with nostalgia only when they are past.
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  27. Neil McKinnon (2003). Vague Simples. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):394–397.score: 30.0
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  28. Christine McKinnon (1989). Ways of Wrong-Doing, the Vices, and Cruelty. Journal of Value Inquiry 23 (4):319-335.score: 30.0
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  29. Catriona McKinnon (2000). Exclusion Rules and Self-Respect. Journal of Value Inquiry 34 (4):491-505.score: 30.0
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  30. C. McKinnon (2013). Luck, Value and Commitment. Analysis 73 (3):568-576.score: 30.0
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  31. Rachel McKinnon (2013). Getting Luck Properly Under Control. Metaphilosophy 44 (4):496-511.score: 30.0
    This article proposes a new account of luck and how luck impacts attributions of credit for agents' actions. It proposes an analogy with the expected value of a series of wagers and argues that luck is the difference between actual outcomes and expected value. The upshot of the argument is that when considering the interplay of intention, chance, outcomes, skill, and actions, we ought to be more parsimonious in our attributions of credit when exercising a skill and obtaining successful outcomes, (...)
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  32. Rachel McKinnon & Mathieu Doucet (forthcoming). This Paper Took Too Long to Write: A Puzzle About Overcoming Weakness of Will. Philosophical Psychology:1-21.score: 30.0
    This paper took too long to write: A puzzle about overcoming weakness of will. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/09515089.2013.827394.
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  33. Christine McKinnon (1991). Hypocrisy, with a Note on Integrity. American Philosophical Quarterly 28 (4):321 - 330.score: 30.0
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  34. Alastair McKinnon (1967). &Quot;miracle" and "Paradox&Quot;. American Philosophical Quarterly 4 (4):308-314.score: 30.0
    THIS PAPER DISTINGUISHES TWO MAIN SUPERNATURALIST SENSES OF ’MIRACLE’ AND FOUR CORRESPONDING SENSES OF ’PARADOX,’ ALL OF WHICH ARE SHOWN TO INVOLVE THE NOTION OF A DISCREPANT OR INCOHERENT FACT. IT REJECTS THIS NOTION AS A CONTRADICTION IN USE AND ARGUES THAT NONE OF THE TRADITIONAL SENSES OF THESE TERMS CAN CONSISTENTLY NAME OR DESCRIBE ANY REAL OR ALLEGED EVENT.
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  35. Christine McKinnon (2002). Hypocrisy and the Good of Character Possession. Dialogue 41 (04):715-.score: 30.0
    L'hypocrisie implique un souci de la réputation morale qui conduit à des contradictions entre les actions et les raisons d'agir qui sont ouvertement déclarées,ou entre les raisons d'agir réelles et celles qui sont ouvertement déclarées. On opposera ici les actions hypocrites aux actions velléitaires, et les personnes hypocrites aux personnes velléitaires. Les rapports entre l'intégrité et l'hypocrisie seront esquissés : ce qui distingue la personne intègre et l'hypocrite, ce sont leurs attitudes respectives à l'endroit de leurs raisons d'agir; cela ouvre (...)
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  36. Catriona McKinnon (1997). Self-Respect and the Stepford Wives. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 97 (3):325–330.score: 30.0
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  37. Rachel McKinnon & Paul Simard Smith (2013). Sure the Emperor Has No Clothes, but You Shouldn't Say That. Philosophia 41 (3):825-829.score: 30.0
    In the norms of assertion literature there has been continued focus on a wide range of odd-sounding assertions that have been collected under the umbrella of Moore’s Paradox. Our aim in these brief remarks is not to attempt to settle the question of what makes an utterance Moorean decisively, but rather to present some new data bearing on it, and to argue that this new data is best explained by a new account of Moorean absurdity.
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  38. Christine McKinnon (2006). Varieties of Insincerity. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 20 (1):23-40.score: 30.0
    Agents can be insincere in many different ways. They can utter claims they take to be false, or they can utter true claims with an intention to deceive their audiences. While both liars and virtual liars are committed truth-seekers, they are poor truth-sharers. Agents can also deceive about their reasons for holding the true beliefs that they hold: cheaters and plagiarists deceive about the justifications of their true beliefs, and they intentionally exploit our normative practices of evaluating cognitive agents. Agents (...)
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  39. Christine Mckinnon (2007). Morality, Moral Luck and Responsibility: Fortune's Web - By Nafsika Athanassoulis. Philosophical Books 48 (1):88-90.score: 30.0
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  40. Christine McKinnon (2006). Agent Reliabilism, Subjective Justification, and Epistemic Credit. Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):489-508.score: 30.0
    In this paper I examine John Greco’s agent reliabilism, in particular, his requirement of subjective justification. I argue that his requirement is too weak as it stands to disqualify as knowledge claims some true beliefs arrived at by reliable processes and that it is vulnerable to the “value problem” objection. I develop a more robust account of subjective justification that both avoids the objection that agents require beliefs about their dispositions in order to be subjectively justified and explains why knowledge (...)
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  41. Alastair McKinnon (1984). Kierkegaard's Interpretation of His 'Authorship': Some Statistical Evidence. Inquiry 27 (1-4):225 – 233.score: 30.0
    In The Point of View for my Work as an Author, Kierkegaard declares that the works discussed therein move from the aesthetic to the religious, that the Postscript represents the turning point in this movement, etc. In this brief and preliminary study we use a ?change?point? version of the chi?square test on the frequencies of selected sets of ?aesthetic? and ?religious? words to determine the degree of statistical evidence for these and other related claims. Briefly, these tests show that there (...)
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  42. Alastair McKinnon (1969). Kierkegaard's Irrationalism Revisited. International Philosophical Quarterly 9 (2):165-176.score: 30.0
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  43. Catriona McKinnon (2013). Vertical Toleration as a Liberal Idea. Social Theory and Practice 39 (1):1-18.score: 30.0
    This paper argues that the direct, vertical toleration of certain types of citizen by the Rawlsian liberal state is appropriate and required in circumstances in which these types of citizen pose a threat to the stability of the state. By countering the claim that vertical toleration is redundant given a commitment to the Rawlsian version of the liberal democratic ideal, and by articulating a version of that ideal that shows this claim to be false, the paper reaffirms the centrality of (...)
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  44. Catriona McKinnon (2011). Climate Change Justice: Getting Motivated in the Last Chance Saloon. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (2):195-213.score: 30.0
    A key reason for pessimism with respect to greenhouse gas emissions reduction relates to the ?motivation problem?, whereby those who could make the biggest difference prima facie have the least incentive to act because they are most able to adapt: how can we motivate such people (and thereby everyone else) to accept, indeed to initiate, the changes to their lifestyles that are required for effective emissions reductions? This paper offers an account inspired by Rawls of the good of membership of (...)
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  45. Catriona McKinnon (2006). Giving as Good as You Get? Res Publica 12 (2):203-212.score: 30.0
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  46. Alastair McKinnon (1963). Philosophy of Religion. By Christopher Jacob Boström. Translated with Introduction by Victor E. Beck and Robert N. Beck. New Haven, Yale University Press. Montreal, McGill University Press, 1962. Pp. Lvi, 187. $6.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 1 (04):438-439.score: 30.0
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  47. Alastair McKinnon (1973). Kierkegaard's Remarks on Philosophy. Journal of the History of Philosophy 11 (4):513-522.score: 30.0
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  48. Catriona Mckinnon (2002). Review: Virtue, Reason and Toleration. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (441):156-158.score: 30.0
  49. Gideon Calder & Catriona McKinnon (2011). Introduction: Climate Change and Liberal Priorities. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (2):91-97.score: 30.0
  50. Alastair McKinnon (1975). Computational Analysis of Kierkegaard's Samlede Værker. E. J. Brill.score: 30.0
    INTRODUCTION In the course of their excavations on Delos, the sacred island of Apollo, archaeologists discovered considerable remains of an Egyptian cult. ...
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