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Profile: Riccardo Manzotti (IULM University (Milan))
  1. Riccardo Manzotti, Does Process Externalism.
    Yet we experience qualities. Thus qualities are an empirical fact. Even hard-core neuroscientists like Cristoph Koch have acknowledged it: “the provisional approach I take. . .is to consider first person experiences as brute facts of life and seek to explain them.” (Koch 2004: 7). But since objective knowledge of the world is independent of qualities, the world is supposed to be devoid of qualities. Qualities are supposed to emerge out of the subject – whatever the subject is.
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  2. Riccardo Manzotti & Paolo Moderato, Riccardo Manzotti, Paolo Moderato.
    The widespread use of brain imaging techniques encourages conceiving of neuroscience as the forthcoming “mindscience.” Perhaps surprisingly for many, this conclusion is still largely unwarranted. The present paper surveys various shortcomings of neuroscience as a putative “mindscience.” The analysis shows that the scope of mind (both cognitive and phenomenal) falls outside that of neuroscience. Of course, such a conclusion does not endorse any metaphysical or antiscientific stance as to the nature of the mind. Rather, it challenges a series of assumptions (...)
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  3. Riccardo Manzotti (ed.) (forthcoming). Situated Aesthetics: Art Beyond the Skin. Imprint Academic.
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  4. Riccardo Manzotti & Paolo Moderato (2014). Intentional Change, Intrinsic Motivations, and Goal Generation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (4):431-432.
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  5. Andrea Lavazza & Riccardo Manzotti (2013). An Externalist Approach to Creativity: Discovery Versus Recombination. Mind and Society 12 (1):61-72.
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  6. Riccardo Manzotti & Robert Pepperell (2013). Denying the Content–Vehicle Distinction: A Response to 'The New Mind Revisited'. AI and Society 28 (4):467-470.
  7. Riccardo Manzotti & Robert Pepperell (2013). The New Mind: Thinking Beyond the Head. [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (2):157-166.
    Throughout much of the modern period, the human mind has been regarded as a property of the brain and therefore something confined to the inside of the head—a view commonly known as ‘internalism’. But recent works in cognitive science, philosophy, and anthropology, as well as certain trends in the development of technology, suggest an emerging view of the mind as a process not confined to the brain but spread through the body and world—an outlook covered by a family of views (...)
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  8. Maria Cristina Amoretti & Riccardo Manzotti (2012). Externalisms. Rivista di Filosofia 103 (1):41-68.
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  9. Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (2012). AGI and Machine Consciousness. In Pei Wang & Ben Goertzel (eds.), Theoretical Foundations of Artificial General Intelligence. Springer. 263--282.
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  10. Riccardo Manzotti (2012). The Computational Stance is Unfit for Consciousness. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 4 (02):401-420.
  11. Riccardo Manzotti (2011). Is Consciousness Just Conscious Behavior? International Journal of Machine Consciousness 3 (02):353-360.
  12. Riccardo Manzotti (2011). The Spread Mind. Is Consciousness Situated?". Teorema 30 (2):55-78.
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  13. Riccardo Manzotti & Paolo Moderato (2010). Is Neuroscience Adequate as the Forthcoming “Mindscience”?. Behavior and Philosophy 38:1-29.
  14. Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (2009). Machine Consciousness: A Manifesto for Robotics. International Journal of Machine Consciousness 1 (01):33-51.
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  15. Riccardo Manzotti (2009). No Time, No Wholes: A Temporal and Causal-Oriented Approach to the Ontology of Wholes. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 19 (2):193-214.
    What distinguishes a whole from an arbitrary sum of elements? I suggest a temporal and causal oriented approach. I defend two connected claims. The former is that existence is, by every means, coextensive with being the cause of a causal process. The latter is that a whole is the cause of a causal process with a joint effect. Thus, a whole is something that takes place in time. The approach endorses an unambiguous version of Restricted Composition that suits most commonsensical (...)
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  16. Riccardo Manzotti (2008). 9 A Process-Oriented View of Qualia. In Edmond Wright (ed.), The Case for Qualia. The Mit Press. 175.
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  17. Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (2007). Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic.
    And why is there a subjective component to experience?). It is easy to see that the separation between Weak and Strong Artificial Consciousness mirrors the separation between the easy problems and the hard problems of consciousness.
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  18. Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (2007). Artificial Intelligence and Consciousness. In Anthony Chella & Ricardo Manzotti (eds.), Ai and Consciousness: Theoretical Foundations and Current Approaches. Aaai Press, Merlo Park, Ca.
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  19. Riccardo Manzotti (2007). From Artificial Intelligence to Artificial Consciousness. In Antonio Chella & Riccardo Manzotti (eds.), Artificial Consciousness. Imprint Academic. 174-190.
     
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  20. Riccardo Manzotti (2006). An Alternative View of Conscious Perception. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (6):45-79.
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  21. Riccardo Manzotti (2006). A Process Oriented View of Conscious Perception. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (6):7-41.
    I present a view of conscious perception that supposes a processual unity between the activity in the brain and the perceived event in the external world. I use the rainbow to provide a first example, and subsequently extend the same rationale to more complex examples such as perception of objects, faces and movements. I use a process-based approach as an explanation of ordinary perception and other variants, such as illusions, memory, dreams and mental imagery. This approach provides new insights into (...)
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  22. Riccardo Manzotti (2006). Book Review: Brentano's Immanent Realism and Beyond. [REVIEW] Mind and Matter 4 (1):115-119.
    Review of Albertazzi, L. (2006): 'ImmanentRealism.An Introduction to Brentano'. Springer, Netherlands. ISBN 1-402-04201-9 (Euro 139.-; hbk).
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  23. Riccardo Manzotti & Giulio Sandini (2002). What Does “Isomorphism Between Conscious Representations and the Structure of the World” Mean? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):346-347.
    Perruchet & Vinter's provocative article challenges a series of interesting issues, yet the concept of isomorphism is troublesome for a series of reasons: (1) isomorphism entails some sort of dualism; (2) isomorphism does not entail that a piece of the world is a representation; and (3) it is extremely difficult to provide an explanation about the nature of the relation of isomorphism.
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  24. Riccardo Manzotti & Giulio Sandini (2001). Does Functionalism Really Deal with the Phenomenal Side of Experience? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):993-994.
    Sensory motor contingencies belong to a functionalistic framework. Functionalism does not explain why and how objective functional relations produce phenomenal experience. O'Regan & Noë (O&N) as well as other functionalists do not propose a new ontology that could support the first person subjective phenomenal side of experience.
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